Display expert says iPad 2 LCD nearly as good as iPhone 4

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
An in-depth scientific analysis of the iPad 2 display reveals that Apple's latest tablet, despite having significantly lower pixel density, delivers "almost identical" performance to the iPhone 4.



Dr. Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies, conducted the tests in a "shoot-out" between the iPad 2 and the iPhone 4.



According to Soneira, the iPad 2 "has excellent LCD display hardware," but could benefit from a software update to improve anti-aliasing and automatic brightness controls. Soneira's overall assessment concludes that "other than PPI resolution the iPad 2 display delivers similar performance to the iPhone 4 Retina Display."



The report suggests that anti-aliasing enhancements to iOS would compensate for the iPad 2's lower pixel density. The iPad 2 maintains the same density, 132 pixels per inch (ppi), as the original iPad, while the iPhone 4 boasts a Retina Display with 326 ppi. Soneira sees the iPhone 4's high pixel density "as something of an overkill (and primarily there for App compatibility)" because anti-aliasing methods can reduce pixelation at lower resolutions and ppi.



Soneira also notes that a "bug" in Apple's automatic brightness controls locks brightness based on "the brightest ambient light sensor value that has been measured at any point starting from the time unit was awakened," even after a substantial decrease in ambient light. This issue, however, occurs across all iOS devices, and could be a simple software fix.







According to the report, Apple will likely upgrade the resolution of the iPad in the next-generation version. AppleInsider reported last month that cost and manufacturing restraints had led Apple to push back a Retina Display upgrade to the iPad 3.



It had previously been suggested that Apple planned to double the resolution of the iPad to 2048 x 1536 on the second generation of the tablet.



Though rumors have surfaced(1, 2) that the Cupertino, Calif., iPad maker had planned a tablet upgrade for later this year, Apple CEO Steve Jobs seemed to quash speculation when he declared 2011 the "Year of iPad 2" at a media event unveiling the device earlier this month.



The iPad 2 is set to have a blowout launch after drawing record lines last Friday. Checks by analysts revealed on Tuesday that new shipments of the device have sold out immediately, prompting speculation that Apple could delay the planned March 25 international launch of the iPad 2, as it did with the original iPad last year.



Shipping times for online orders of the iPad 2 have slipped to 4-5 weeks from launch day estimates of 2-3 weeks.
«1345

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 82
    nobodyynobodyy Posts: 377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Soneira also notes that a "bug" in Apple's automatic brightness controls locks brightness based on "the brightest ambient light sensor value that has been measured at any point starting from the time unit was awakened," even after a substantial decrease in ambient light. This issue, however, occurs across all iOS devices, and could be a simple software fix.



    This is not a bug and is the intended usage of the automatic brightness controls.

    I think in the original iPhone Keynote, from back in 2007, Steve Jobs said something about it being weird for your phone's display to constantly go in and out, so it only changes in high brightness to remain readable.
  • Reply 2 of 82
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,215member
    I suspect it is like the difference between 720P and 1080p on most 40" - 50" TVs, many people can't tell the difference. We all know NTSC sucked but above a certain level of pixel density it simply comes down to marginal improvements visually. The difference will be greater for dealing with fine lines and precision curser placement in apps that require that but these are probably few and far between as of yet.
  • Reply 3 of 82
    boogabooga Posts: 1,077member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Soneira sees the iPhone 4's high pixel density "as something of an overkill (and primarily there for App compatibility)" because anti-aliasing methods can reduce pixelation at lower resolutions and ppi.



    He couldn't be more wrong about this. The iPhone 4's pixel density is probably one of its best qualities and what really sets it apart from everything else on the market. Anti-aliasing can make things a little better, but it can also wash out detail. I don't think the iPhone 4 would be nearly as usable at 132ppi.
  • Reply 4 of 82
    deletedelete Posts: 46member
    Looking at an iPad 2 the other night it still suffers from some awkward font renderings on web pages. The anti aliasing method he mentions must only work on some sites.
  • Reply 5 of 82
    stokessdstokessd Posts: 103member
    If you are half blind or only using the iPad at arms length, then maybe he is right. But the ability to move the pad closer to your face like the phone would make the display differences immediately obvious.



    The macbook Pro and Macbook Air have similar pixel densities to the iPad, and when held side by side with the iPhone 4, the differences are immediate and obvious.



    I am not buying a pad until there is a retina display on it.



    Sheldon
  • Reply 6 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Booga View Post


    He couldn't be more wrong about this. The iPhone 4's pixel density is probably one of its best qualities and what really sets it apart from everything else on the market. Anti-aliasing can make things a little better, but it can also wash out detail. I don't think the iPhone 4 would be nearly as usable at 132ppi.



    I agree. I heard much the same song and dance when HDTVs arrived but resolution did make a difference to consumers. --Even in the much debated 720p - 1080p comparisons. Higher res always won the day.
  • Reply 7 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stokessd View Post


    If you are half blind or only using the iPad at arms length, then maybe he is right. But the ability to move the pad closer to your face like the phone would make the display differences immediately obvious.



    The macbook Pro and Macbook Air have similar pixel densities to the iPad, and when held side by side with the iPhone 4, the differences are immediate and obvious.



    I am not buying a pad until there is a retina display on it.



    Sheldon



    I own the original iPad and plan to pick up another one but am waiting for the Retina display. I was disappointed that the iPad2 did not have this. I was hoping to buy one this Spring but will have to wait a bit longer now.
  • Reply 8 of 82
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,300member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Booga View Post


    He couldn't be more wrong about this. The iPhone 4's pixel density is probably one of its best qualities and what really sets it apart from everything else on the market. Anti-aliasing can make things a little better, but it can also wash out detail. I don't think the iPhone 4 would be nearly as usable at 132ppi.



    Exactly right. I'm reading this on my iPhone4 now, and the pixel density of the Retna display is simply amazing. Text that would be unreadable on previous iPhones or the iPad is crisp and clear.



    Anti-aliasing is good for pictures, but it can't create detail for vector or line art like text where the detail simply isn't diaplayable. Luckily with the larger screen of the iPad I don't have to have small text as I do on the iPhone because of the physical display size of the iPhone, but I do hope one day they do offer a high resolution display because even for it's small size the iPhone 4 display is increadibly easy on the eyes.
  • Reply 9 of 82
    bryanlbryanl Posts: 67member
    Amazing!
  • Reply 10 of 82
    "despite having significantly lower pixel density, delivers "almost identical" performance to the iPhone 4."



    That statement makes as much sense as stating that a Honda Civic has "almost identical" performance to a Maybach because they both have wheels



    I'm not in a hurry (READ: not sucked up into Apple's hype vortex) and can wait until the display is a bit higher quality. F.Y.I.W., I've been purchasing and using Apple products since the IIe; don't want to be accused of being a Troll And Booga's right about the iPhone 4 Retina Display; I can read easier and see better on it than either the iPad 1 or 2.
  • Reply 11 of 82
    kotatsukotatsu Posts: 1,010member
    I'm waiting for iPad 3 before any upgrade. The current DPI is just brutal. I struggle to do any reading on an iPad as text looks truly dreadful unless blown up to jumbo sizes.



    Hopefully by next year GPUs will have improved enough to allow a doubling of the DPI while retaining the same or better performance.
  • Reply 12 of 82
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,300member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Apple 1984 View Post


    I agree. I heard much the same song and dance when HDTVs arrived but resolution did make a difference to consumers. --Even in the much debated 720p - 1080p comparisons. Higher res always won the day.



    HDTV is a bad comparison since you are typically 6 or more feet away from them - the further away you are, the less relevant resolution is. Also, you don't tend to read lot's of small point text on a TV.



    High resolution on HDTV "won" more due to hype and the checklist feature spec-oriented mentality than any actual real advantage.



    It's the opposite with devices like the iPhone and iPad that are typically a foot or less from your eyes - differences in resolution are readily apparent and appreciatable.
  • Reply 13 of 82
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Soneira is quite simply an idiot, and I'm ashamed of AI for wasting space with this no-talent hack's sputtering garbage.



    iPhone 4 overkill? Lol no



    iPad almost as good? Lol No



    Anti aliasing? Wtf? What an idiot
  • Reply 14 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    An in-depth scientific analysis of the iPad 2 display reveals that Apple's latest tablet, despite having significantly lower pixel density, delivers "almost identical" performance to the iPhone 4.



    Dr. Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies, conducted the tests in a "shoot-out" between the iPad 2 and the iPhone 4.



    According to Soneira, the iPad 2 "has excellent LCD display hardware," but could benefit from a software update to improve anti-aliasing and automatic brightness controls. Soneira's overall assessment concludes that "other than PPI resolution the iPad 2 display delivers similar performance to the iPhone 4 Retina Display."



    The report suggests that anti-aliasing enhancements to iOS would compensate for the iPad 2's lower pixel density. The iPad 2 maintains the same density, 132 pixels per inch (ppi), as the original iPad, while the iPhone 4 boasts a Retina Display with 326 ppi. Soneira sees the iPhone 4's high pixel density "as something of an overkill (and primarily there for App compatibility)" because anti-aliasing methods can reduce pixelation at lower resolutions and ppi.



    Soneira also notes that a "bug" in Apple's automatic brightness controls locks brightness based on "the brightest ambient light sensor value that has been measured at any point starting from the time unit was awakened," even after a substantial decrease in ambient light. This issue, however, occurs across all iOS devices, and could be a simple software fix.



    According to the report, Apple will likely upgrade the resolution of the iPad in the next-generation version. AppleInsider reported last month that cost and manufacturing restraints had led Apple to push back a Retina Display upgrade to the iPad 3.



    It had previously been suggested that Apple planned to double the resolution of the iPad to 2048 x 1536 on the second generation of the tablet.



    Though rumors have surfaced(1, 2) that the Cupertino, Calif., iPad maker had planned a tablet upgrade for later this year, Apple CEO Steve Jobs seemed to quash speculation when he declared 2011 the "Year of iPad 2" at a media event unveiling the device earlier this month.



    The iPad 2 is set to have a blowout launch after drawing record lines last Friday. Checks by analysts revealed on Tuesday that new shipments of the device have sold out immediately, prompting speculation that Apple could delay the planned March 25 international launch of the iPad 2, as it did with the original iPad last year.



    Shipping times for online orders of the iPad 2 have slipped to 4-5 weeks from launch day estimates of 2-3 weeks.





    'Tis truly amazing how many posts are just copy, paste ... over and over ... doesn't make sense, the iPAD display as noted above is gorgeous. Read over anandtech.com review of the GPU ... read all the comments ... super technical ... then give up repeating the iPAD is getting Retina . It is not practical, nor cost effective and will degrade overall performance. That is not the Apple Plan. Maybe the plan of the fanbois. but they live in a dream world anyway.
  • Reply 15 of 82
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stokessd View Post


    I am not buying a pad until there is a retina display on it.



    Same here, but even then I may not buy one. Why can't I attach files to an email from Apple's default email program? Let's take pictures for example. I can't reply and attach something to an email chain. No, I have to open the photo app first, browse for the pic and then choose share, which creates a whole new email. Dumb. Granted this is an iOS limitation and not an iPad limitation, but it's still basic functionality.



    I guess I am one of those who has no need for a tablet. I'll stick to my trusty 17" MacBook Pro.
  • Reply 16 of 82
    hattighattig Posts: 830member
    132dpi isn't bad at arm's length, but you can see the individual pixels and you lose detail - especially on scaled-down images with text in them, and smaller font sizes.



    Personally I'd like it if some desktop monitors were given 132dpi, never mind 260+.



    I don't know if it's a major reason to not get an iPad 2 unless you will be doing a lot of reading on it - the extra crispness will make a difference here, and possibly reduce eye strain (pixellated text can cause eye strain as the eye has to do more work to interpret what it is seeing).



    It's a shame that the iPad doesn't support 1.5x scaling - a 1536x1152 display would be a good compromise, and probably be more manufacturable.
  • Reply 17 of 82
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    Same here, but even then I may not buy one. Why can't I attach files to an email from Apple's default email program? Let's take pictures for example. I can't reply and attach something to an email chain. No, I have to open the photo app first, browse for the pic and then choose share, which creates a whole new email. Dumb. Granted this is an iOS limitation and not an iPad limitation, but it's still basic functionality.



    I guess I am one of those who has no need for a tablet. I'll stick to my trusty 17" MacBook Pro.



    Well you could hit reply, then using the multitasking ability, go into your photos, long press on the photo you want, hit copy and then switch back to mail and paste into the reply. It's not perfect but it does work.
  • Reply 18 of 82
    sennensennen Posts: 1,465member
    Soniera was the guy who said the "retina display" was false marketing. I don't hold much stock in what he says.
  • Reply 19 of 82
    sennensennen Posts: 1,465member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post


    I'm waiting for iPad 3 before any upgrade. The current DPI is just brutal. I struggle to do any reading on an iPad as text looks truly dreadful unless blown up to jumbo sizes.



    Hopefully by next year GPUs will have improved enough to allow a doubling of the DPI while retaining the same or better performance.



    lol. You'll find another excuse not to buy next year.
  • Reply 20 of 82
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,772member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madhatter61 View Post






    'Tis truly amazing how many posts are just copy, paste ... over and over ... doesn't make sense, the iPAD display as noted above is gorgeous. Read over anandtech.com review of the GPU ... read all the comments ... super technical ... then give up repeating the iPAD is getting Retina . It is not practical, nor cost effective and will degrade overall performance. That is not the Apple Plan. Maybe the plan of the fanbois. but they live in a dream world anyway.



    They wouldn't get the Ipad2 even if it did have retina display. That crap about "I'm waiting for retina display" is a crock. What they really mean is "I don't want the Ipad2 and nothing is going to change that".
Sign In or Register to comment.