Interest in Apple's iPhone reaches record high among teens

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple has achieved a record 17 percent iPhone market share among teens, a new survey has found, with an additional 37 percent of respondents indicating interest in buying an iPhone in the next 6 months.



The 21st bi-annual Piper Jaffray teen survey of 4,500 high school students found that Apple continues to dominate the teen market and has driven surprisingly quick adoption of tablets by teens.



"Apple's dominance in the mobile and online music markets is going seemingly unchecked, coupled with rising interest in the iPhone and iPad," the survey concluded.



iPhone



The percentage of teens who own the iPhone jumped from 14 percent in October of last year to 17 percent this spring. The number of teens who plan on buying an iPhone in the next 6 months rose from 33 percent last fall to 37 percent this spring. According to Piper Jaffray, intent to buy has historically translated into subsequent market share gains.



"Interest among teens in purchasing an iPhone has grown steadily since Apple introduced the iPhone, and we expect this to continue," Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster noted.







iPad



The Spring 2011 survey marked the first time that Piper Jaffray included a tablet category. The percentage of teens who already own a tablet stood at a surprising 22 percent, while an additional 20 percent of teens indicated plans to purchase a tablet in the next 6 months.



Though the survey did not specifically ask students which brand of tablet they owned, Munster viewed the data as a positive for Apple "given the iPad's dominant position in the tablet market."



Last month, the IDC revealed that the iPad represented 73 percent of tablet shipments in the fourth quarter of 2010 and 83 percent of the tablet market for the entire year.



Portable Music Players



The percentage of students with a portable media player (PMP) declined from 90 percent to 80 percent over the past six months as students continued the trend of using their phones to listen to music. Spring 2011 marked the lowest percentage of MP3 player ownership among teens since fall 2007.



Despite the decrease in MP3 player, Apple continued to dominate the market. The Cupertino, Calif., iPod maker's share of the teen MP3 player market rose from 78 percent in fall 2010 to 86 percent this spring.







Online music



Apple's share of the paid music download market continued to approach saturation at 95 percent, though the majority of teens used free peer-to-peer networks to download music illegally. 65 percent of respondents admitted to using P2P to download music for free.







"With the addition of new features to iTunes software and the Ping social network we believe Apple is well-positioned to hold its lead and even extend it," said Munster, adding that the App Store may be driving music sales for Apple as teens search for free apps in the App Store and then purchase music in the iTunes Music Store.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    rokradrokrad Posts: 143member
    I hate surveys like this that poll such few sample size and generalize their results throughout the entire population...



    But hey thats how surveys work...
  • Reply 2 of 21
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 18,515member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokrad View Post


    I hate surveys like this that poll such few sample size and generalize their results throughout the entire population...



    But hey thats how surveys work...



    You really should learn some basics regarding the theory and practice of statistical sampling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_(statistics)
  • Reply 3 of 21
    cvaldes1831cvaldes1831 Posts: 1,832member
    Duh, the teens have been using iPod touches for over three years now. Steve called the iPod touch as "training wheels for the iPhone" (Apple sells two iPod touches for every three iPhones); the iPod touch has a considerably younger demographic vis-a-vis the iPhone.



    With social networking and free texting fully implemented on the iPod touch via various apps, this is a total no-brainer. The other smartphone manufacturers basically have nothing that competes with the iPod touch and thus aren't grabbing any mindshare of these younger users.
  • Reply 4 of 21
    bdkennedy1bdkennedy1 Posts: 1,459member
    Of course teens want the iPhone. It's a luxury item for a popularity contest at school. But Mommy and Daddy have to shell out the extra $30 a month to use it.



    Most teenagers don't know how to care for or appreciate an iPhone, especially made of glass. They beat everything they use up. Ever see one of their laptops after one year?
  • Reply 5 of 21
    cvaldes1831cvaldes1831 Posts: 1,832member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post


    Of course teens want the iPhone. It's a luxury item for a popularity contest at school. But Mommy and Daddy have to shell out the extra $30 a month to use it.



    Most teenagers don't know how to care for or appreciate an iPhone, especially made of glass. They beat everything they use up. Ever see one of their laptops after one year?



    The iPhone is made out of the same basic materials as the iPod touch.



    And phones shouldn't have to be coddled. If teens can handle and iPod touch, they can handle iPhones.
  • Reply 6 of 21
    seankillseankill Posts: 368member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post


    Of course teens want the iPhone. It's a luxury item for a popularity contest at school. But Mommy and Daddy have to shell out the extra $30 a month to use it.



    Most teenagers don't know how to care for or appreciate an iPhone, especially made of glass. They beat everything they use up. Ever see one of their laptops after one year?



    Hmmmm, having gone to a private school, I don't remember anyone saying they are popular or better because of an iPhone. Nor anyone in college (my freshman year). I had an iPhone myself and until a bunch of people got them, I always tried to hide it. I also paid for both of them (3G, 4). My laptop is also 4+ years old. Though granted I probably best them around more than an adult but I also probably did 10 times the amount of exercise, going places, and using these devices than you or other adults.

    That said, I recently got an iPad (I paid for) and the best buy guy tried to talk me into a Xoom, wth is that about. Knowing how crappy android is, I got the iPad 2.

    Also have a die hard android fan use iTunes recently and he saw how apple crap Works, He loves Mac now and wants a Mac book pro. Thought that'd be worth mentioning
  • Reply 7 of 21
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Apple has achieved a record 17 percent iPhone market share among teens,



    Actually, Apple should have a 100% iPhone market share.



    A well-written sentence would convey that the iPhone has a 17% share of the cell phone market.
  • Reply 8 of 21
    rokradrokrad Posts: 143member
    Deleted for double post... sorry
  • Reply 9 of 21
    rokradrokrad Posts: 143member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    You really should learn some basics regarding the theory and practice of statistical sampling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_(statistics)



    Oh no I do understand but it has bothered me ever since I learned of it in my Statistics classes...



    Im just stating my opinion thats it...
  • Reply 10 of 21
    I don't see a table to represent where the teens are obtaining music. I only see a repeat of the table about which type of MP3 player these teens own. Is it just me?
  • Reply 11 of 21
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    You really should learn some basics regarding the theory and practice of statistical sampling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_(statistics)



    Exactly. Here in America the pinnacle of high school mathematics is Calculus. It should be Statistics.



    There is a lot wrong with American education, but teaching Statistics would help immensely.
  • Reply 12 of 21
    orlandoorlando Posts: 601member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "With the addition of new features to iTunes software and the Ping social network we believe Apple is well-positioned to hold its lead and even extend it," said Munster



    Ping? Really? Does anyone actually use Ping?
  • Reply 13 of 21
    mennomenno Posts: 854member
    If the survey was of Teens, then they weren't buying the devices. Their parents were. (Statistically)
  • Reply 14 of 21
    seankillseankill Posts: 368member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post


    Exactly. Here in America the pinnacle of high school mathematics is Calculus. It should be Statistics.



    There is a lot wrong with American education, but teaching Statistics would help immensely.



    Why not both? Aiming for a mech engineering degree. I regret not taking calculus in school. I would not omit it.
  • Reply 15 of 21
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    My son is in high school. I asked him.



    He has seen 3 iPhones amongst all years of the school population. Not one of them is an iP4. There are about 130 kids in his year. One has an iPhone. At least 30 have entry-level Androids. Most of the rest have feature phones.



    All depends on where you do your sampling.



    Liar; Damned liar; Statistician
  • Reply 16 of 21
    deanbardeanbar Posts: 106member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Orlando View Post


    Ping? Really? Does anyone actually use Ping?



    You beat me to it, word for word, my thoughts exactly. This must be one of the lamest Apple programs ever, quickly followed by iCal.
  • Reply 17 of 21
    kerrynkerryn Posts: 87member
    "The number of teens who plan on buying an iPhone in the next 6 months rose from 33 percent last fall to 37 percent this spring"



    Shouldn't this be that 37% of teens expect to pester their parents until mommy and daddy give in and buy an iPhone for their spawn so that they don't think their kid will be a "social outcast" among their peers. \



    Of course this depends on the part of the country you live in. I recently moved from the Chicago 'burbs where it seemed to be a competitive sport among parents to get their kids the latest and greatest. It was shocking behavior. I now live in Colorado, when the parents that I have met seem to be much more rounded individuals and are much less concerned on materialistic "over achieving". I'm glad I'm not in Illinois anymore.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    frodohfrodoh Posts: 4member
    I believe these figures reflect growing concensus that iPhones aren't only

    ♫ Perfect for kickin' it in the back seat ♫ but

    ♫ Fun, fun, fun, fun... fun ♫ to boot!
  • Reply 19 of 21
    chokochoko Posts: 1member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    You really should learn some basics regarding the theory and practice of statistical sampling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_(statistics)



    And you should learn to respond to a comment without sounding like a jerk.

    That being said, why weren't the sampling methods disclosed for this survey? They disclose the number of respondents, but not how they were selected. I call shenanigans.
  • Reply 20 of 21
    mennomenno Posts: 854member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by choko View Post


    And you should learn to respond to a comment without sounding like a jerk.

    That being said, why weren't the sampling methods disclosed for this survey? They disclose the number of respondents, but not how they were selected. I call shenanigans.



    Sampling methods for these surveys are never disclosed. What they do is they find the statistic that will generate the biggest SEO and then craft a press release with JUST enough data to back up that statistic and then they ship the press release to a few select blogs they can trust to NOT publish the full press release.



    Then, if someone (like you or I) want to read the methodology, we have to go to their website and shell out between $400-$1600 for a DIGITAL copy of the research. I have no doubt that these places are following some methodology, but what ticks me off are when websites (especially the big ones like CNN) publish the findings of these press releases without giving us at least a HINT of the methodology.
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