Fake jailbreak targets iPad

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
While this one did no harm, it would be a good time to remind everyone that once you leave Apple's Walled Garden, iOS is not immune to stupidity. Had this been a malware package, how many iPad's could it have infected?



As the Sarge said. "Hey! . . . Be careful out there".



http://www.networkworld.com/news/201..._am_2011-04-29

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 5
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Don't worry, Android lets you download malware without having to jailbreak.
  • Reply 2 of 5
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,277member
    Obviously. Android doesn't have a Walled Garden.



    With 10% or more of iPhones jailbroken, it's appropriate to remind everyone to be much more careful if they do.
  • Reply 3 of 5
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,208moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Obviously. Android doesn't have a Walled Garden.



    With 10% or more of iPhones jailbroken, it's appropriate to remind everyone to be much more careful if they do.



    What we need are code signed jailbreaks from trusted malicious sources. In effect creating a walled garden again but the wall is short enough for your neighbours to see how much greener the grass is on your side yet still high enough to keep their weeds out.



    I think Apple could do more to stop jailbreaking by reducing the reasons for people to jailbreak. The only thing that Apple needs to protect on the phone is the security of 3rd-party developers' applications from being stolen. This should not prevent them from running software that requires a VM. It shouldn't prevent UI customisation. It shouldn't prevent you using a terminal or running an ssh or web server or whatever you want to run really. If they have a feature that allows people to demo apps for a period of time like Amazon, there's hardly any reasons left to even go through the pain of jailbreaking and risking messing up your baseband.
  • Reply 4 of 5
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    While this one did no harm, it would be a good time to remind everyone that once you leave Apple's Walled Garden, iOS is not immune to stupidity. Had this been a malware package, how many iPad's could it have infected?



    As the Sarge said. "Hey! . . . Be careful out there".



    http://www.networkworld.com/news/201..._am_2011-04-29



    Actually your logic here is flawed. The scam was offering fake jailbreak software. Not software you install after you jailbreak and are only then "leaving the walled garden".



    The scam is like anything else for any system. "Hay guys durr go to this website and install this software you can download all the movies you want for free".



    I don't see the relevance of what appears to be a thread to inflict doubt in people's minds about iOS, which does not reveal a flaw in iOS itself (not that I'm saying there aren't any).



    Jailbreakers should always only use Dev Team tools, follow their Twitter appropriately and do SHA checks on software they download.



    Just like anyone should only download software they trust, for any system, any platform, any situation.
  • Reply 5 of 5
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,277member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


    Actually your logic here is flawed. The scam was offering fake jailbreak software. Not software you install after you jailbreak and are only then "leaving the walled garden".



    The scam is like anything else for any system. "Hay guys durr go to this website and install this software you can download all the movies you want for free".



    I don't see the relevance of what appears to be a thread to inflict doubt in people's minds about iOS, which does not reveal a flaw in iOS itself (not that I'm saying there aren't any).



    Jailbreakers should always only use Dev Team tools, follow their Twitter appropriately and do SHA checks on software they download.



    Just like anyone should only download software they trust, for any system, any platform, any situation.



    You're reading something in my post that I didn't say nor even hint. If you attempt to jailbreak your iOS device, know what software you're allowing to run. Just because it's called a jailbreak tool doesn't mean it is.



    Yes, you're absolutely correct to mention that you're just as exposed as Android users if you aren't careful about the source of applications or software you chose to load after jailbreaking. iOS is no more inherently secure than Android if you leave the garden and don't take proper precautions.



    I didn't mention any of that that since the Network World article was warning about the potential for nefarious uses of fake jailbreak software, not applications in general.
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