RIM recalls 1,000 PlayBooks, Nvidia CEO explains slow Android tablet sales

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
Research in Motion has recalled about 1,000 defective units of its new PlayBook tablet, though most had not yet been sold to users. And in an interview, Nvidia's CEO provided a number of reasons why Android-based tablets aren't selling well yet.



RIM recalls about 1,000 PlayBooks



Research in Motion has issued a recall for about 1,000 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks that were available at Staples retail stores, as first reported by Engadget. The affected devices were said to have a defective build of the touchscreen tablet's operating system.



The site has a complete list of affected serial numbers, so any owners can check to see if their device is part of the problem batch. But RIM also commented on the issue and said most of the devices were in the retail channel and were not sold to end users.



Staples stores were issued a copy of the recall last week, and employees were instructed to pull any inventory with the affected serial numbers. The issue caused users to be unable to set up their new PlayBook.



The PlayBook debuted in April to lukewarm reviews, which indicated that the device seemed to be released to the public without quite being finished. One review suggested the 7-inch device, which RIM hopes will compete with Apple's iPad, seemed "rushed to market."







Nvidia CEO talks Android tablet struggles



Nvidia's chief executive, Jen-Hsun Huang, spoke last week with Cnet (via Hardmac) about slow sales of the first tablets running Android 3.0 Honeycomb. Nvidia makes the Tegra 2 graphics processor found in devices like the Motorola Xoom.



Huang gave a number of reasons why the first Honeycomb-powered tablets haven't had a strong start. Specifically with regard to the Xoom, he said the initial model introduced should not have included 3G, and should have been a Wi-Fi-only option.



"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."



Huang also went on to offer a more positive outlook regarding upcoming products. He noted that the initial struggles are just the first batch of Android 3.0 tablets, and improvements will be made.



"Those problems are all getting solved," he said. "The rate at which these Honeycomb Tegra 2 tablets are being improved is really stunning. I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."







Various reports have indicated that sales of the Motorola Xoom were lower than expected, and projections have been slashed to 100,000, though actual sales figures have not been announced. Future tablets running Honeycomb are said to have been delayed to address issues with the fledgling tablet-only operating system and assess the market, as Apple continues to dominate the market with its iPad.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 181
    msuberlymsuberly Posts: 226member
    Give it up RIM. It's just not going to work out.
  • Reply 2 of 181
    Quote:

    "It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."



    So, you're saying: No one can find them to buy, no one knows how to sell them, no one wants to advertise them, they cost too much and have nothing useful you can do with them. OK I understand now.
  • Reply 3 of 181
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,280member
    The number of missteps taken by Android tablet manufactures so far is amazing. Greedy pricing, failure to recognize the limited market for 3G/4G models, ineffective marketing plans. Couple that with with an OS that looks like it was released before it was fully-cooked just to satisfy a few who wanted to push out tablet models before the launch of Apple's iPad2.



    I agree with NVidia's chief that some of these guys may finally be seeing how their tablets should be marketed, what features are important and what price-points are most effective. Acer's Iconia and especially Asus' Transformer may see some success. I haven't seen any mention whether Honeycomb 3.1 has addressed most of the earlier OS complaints, so I won't comment on that. I have seen some press reports of various Android tablet optimized apps noted, but again don't know how many there are now or even if tablet-specific versions are needed in most cases. No idea.



    But the early entries were certainly less than they could and should have been.
  • Reply 4 of 181
    magicjmagicj Posts: 406member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    But RIM also commented on the issue and said most of the devices were in the retail channel and were not sold to end users.



    Not a surprise since no one is buying them.
  • Reply 5 of 181
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,505member
    ...The Good News is that the majority of the 1.000 units are Still In The Channel and have Not Been Sold To End Users!
  • Reply 6 of 181
    magicjmagicj Posts: 406member
    What's really amazing about all of this is the tablet market existed for 10 years before Apple got into it. No one could do it right and they still can't do it right even after Apple has had a shipping product for a year now.
  • Reply 7 of 181
    All together now, folks:



    1. Point

    2. Laugh



  • Reply 8 of 181
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    "It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."



    Oh dear.
  • Reply 9 of 181
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,331member
    I saw this in action when I stopped by a Staples the one day. I decided to check out the Playbook and give it a fair shake. When I walked up to the display, it was completely disheveled. The device was lopsided on the stand and the screen was half filled and stretched. Complete unusable. Next to the device as a sign printed on a piece of regular paper that said you need to download an update and it takes 30 minutes on a broadband connection.



    Why on EARTH would you buy this load of crap?
  • Reply 10 of 181
    "I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."



    So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?
  • Reply 11 of 181
    carmissimocarmissimo Posts: 837member
    Bottom line is that Apple brings out new products that are well thought out. The iPad was brought to market when it was ready to offer consumers lots of useful, polished applications.



    What is underestimated, though, is the most important aspect of the iPad at launch. Price.



    No one thought a decent tablet could be brought to market, at that time, for such a reasonable price and by taking away probably the only card the competition would have had to play, Apple ended this war before it even started.



    Software is incredibly cheap and so easy to acquire and install, so any whining about Apple using a closed system matters very little to the end user. Industrial design is something Apple has always done better. Apple has a decided advantage now and with significant annual updates, how likely is it that the competition will ever catch up, let alone surpass Apple's efforts.



    If Apple was working on the iPad for years, why is it that the competition is only now struggling to respond. And what does it matter that a year from now competing tablets will become about as polished and capable as the iPad 2 for a competitive price when a year from now Apple will be selling the iPad 3.



    To turn this into a legitimate competition, a competitor has to leapfrog what Apple has accomplished and considering all of them seem to be stumbling around trying to catch up, with that catch-up months away (around the time when Apple will raise the bar with the next iPad), it's not hard to figure out where this is headed.



    So by my calculations, you have to figure out what the iPad 3 is likely to be and offer something similar months before the likely January/February 2012 introduction. We are likely to see a lighter device with more power, more memory, a higher-resolution screen, better cameras, and OS enhancements with no change in price. Are we going to see a competitor bring to market a device able to take on such an iPad 3, only be available to consumers in time for this coming Christmas? Possible but not likely.



    So there it is. That's the challenge. If what we have in time for Christmas are tablets that are at least competitive with the iPad 2, too little, too late.
  • Reply 12 of 181
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by msuberly View Post


    Give it up RIM. It's just not going to work out.



    I actually hope they figure it out and do well. More competition is better for the market. It will push innovation at a faster pace. Yes, even as good as Apple's products are, I believe they could do even better if they had some competition nipping at their heels.
  • Reply 13 of 181
    neilmneilm Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Research in Motion has recalled about 1,000 defective units of its new PlayBook tablet.



    So they've recalled all of them then.
  • Reply 14 of 181
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,280member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post


    "I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."



    So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?



    Apparently a lot.\
  • Reply 15 of 181
    nicolbolasnicolbolas Posts: 254member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post


    "I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."



    So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?



    why do you think the playbook doesn't have email? they spent the time alloted for it to think about if they should make it work when it arrives
  • Reply 16 of 181
    davemcm76davemcm76 Posts: 265member
    Quote:

    "It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."



    That is an awfully long list of pretty fundamental problems, and so far I don't see any clear solutions...
  • Reply 17 of 181
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post


    To turn this into a legitimate competition, a competitor has to leapfrog what Apple has accomplished...



    Not really. They just need to be good enough to offer a viable alternative. Android phones fumbled around for awhile at first, but now are giving Apple some competition. They didn't "leapfrog" the iPhone. They offered good options as an alternative.



    Believe it or not, not everyone drinks the Apple Kool-Aid. Some people want choices which Apple refuse to offer. And I know a growing number of people who are anti-Apple because of that lack of choice and the "my way or the highway" attitude. Sure, Apple has the best option right now, but that doesn't mean it fits everyone's needs.
  • Reply 18 of 181
    j1h15233j1h15233 Posts: 274member
    The problem for Android tablets is iPad. No need to get any fancier than that CEO's of America haha
  • Reply 19 of 181
    danielchowdanielchow Posts: 119member
    "It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."



    or Huang could've just said in three words: "it's a mess."
  • Reply 20 of 181
    eyensteinnoeyensteinno Posts: 148member
    I didn't know there were other notebooks on the market, only the iPad.
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