Email scam targets MobileMe users with iCloud upgrade bait

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Scammers are trying to trick Apple's existing MobileMe subscribers into providing credit card information, purportedly to migrate to the new iCloud service, in a new spam campaign that echoes previous attempts.



The email asks MobileMe members to "Please sign up for iCloud and click the submit botton [sic], you'll be able to keep your old email address and move your mail, contacts, calendars, and bookmarks to the new service.



"Your subscription will be automatically extended through July 31, 2012, at no additional charge.

After that date, MobileMe will no longer be available."







The email provides a link inviting users to "click here to update iCLOUD," but the link actually directs to "flowerpotss.biz," where a phony page asks users to supply their credit card information rather than perform a "no charge" sign up.







Apple has indicated that existing MobileMe users will be able to upgrade, once the service becomes publicly available, after simply logging into their existing account. Users should never supply their account information or credit card details in response to an email.



It's always safer to navigate to online services directly or using a bookmark. Apple never requests users to click a link to enter or "verify" their credit card information.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    I got this one and sent an immediate warning e-mail to family-friends...



    It has a legitimate look to it... But of course wants credit card info to convert to iCloud... yeah right...



    ken
  • Reply 2 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,040member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kenliles View Post


    I got this one and made and e-mailed an immediate warning to family-friends about it



    It has a legitimate look to it... But of course wants credit card info to convert to iCloud... yeah right...



    ken



    I don't think some Apple users will find the need to supply credit card info at all suspicious since one is requested when you first activate your account. It's such a simple scam, but it's probably going to make a lot of money in a very short time.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    Did they really think they would fool people with the "Apple store" thing? They could have at least capitalized the word "store." Or spelled "button" correctly.
  • Reply 4 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by autism10 View Post


    Did they really think they would fool people with the "Apple store" thing? They could have at least capitalized the word "store." Or spelled "button" correctly.



    Apple now is targeting very unsophisticated users. My guess is that lots of Apple customers will fall for it. Mom and pop are not tech savvy, but they have credit cards with large limits.
  • Reply 5 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,040member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by autism10 View Post


    Did they really think they would fool people with the "Apple store" thing? They could have at least capitalized the word "store." Or spelled "button" correctly.



    You do read posts here, correct? You really think spelling is a strong point for some

    users? A good percentage may not notice the errors so apparent to some others.
  • Reply 6 of 25
    Cant even spell Nane right!... Has Scam written al over it but still will fool A LOT of people
  • Reply 7 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,040member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by T1gger View Post


    Cant even spell Nane right!... Has Scam written al over it but still will fool A LOT of people



    That was on purpose, right?
  • Reply 8 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by T1gger View Post


    Cant even spell Nane right!... Has Scam written al over it but still will fool A LOT of people



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    That was on purpose, right?



    Right.
  • Reply 9 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Scammers are trying to trick Apple's existing MobileMe subscribers into providing credit card information, purportedly to migrate to the new iCloud service, in a new spam campaign that echoes previous attempts....



    The easiest way to tell it's a scam is to hover over the link, but then iOS doesn't let one hover.



    Could be a problem.
  • Reply 10 of 25
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    The easiest way to tell it's a scam is to hover over the link, but then iOS doesn't let one hover.



    Could be a problem.



    You have to be pretty naive to not know to look for the secure icon or the https:// before giving up your credit card. Don't kids teach their parents that still?
  • Reply 11 of 25
    Frankly, anyone stupid enough to fall for this deserves what they get.
  • Reply 12 of 25
    whois

    Quote:

    Domain Name: FLOWERPOTSS.BIZ

    Domain ID: D46230628-BIZ

    Sponsoring Registrar: CSL COMPUTER SERVICE (D.B.A. JOKER.COM)

    Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 113

    Registrar URL (registration services): whois.joker.com

    Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited

    Registrant ID: CNEU-210417

    Registrant Name: Stephanie

    Registrant Address1: 5158 Dry Creek Drive

    Registrant City: Dublin

    Registrant State/Province: Ohio

    Registrant Postal Code: 43016

    Registrant Country: United States

    Registrant Country Code: US

    Registrant Phone Number: +44.6143145107

    Registrant Email: ehijie2002@live.com

    Administrative Contact ID: CNEU-9305

    Administrative Contact Name: GET FREE DOMAINS www.uk2.net

    Administrative Contact Organization: UK-2 Ltd

    Administrative Contact Address1: One Canada Square

    Administrative Contact Address2: Canary Wharf

    Administrative Contact City: London

    Administrative Contact State/Province: --

    Administrative Contact Postal Code: E14 5DY

    Administrative Contact Country: UNITED KINGDOM

    Administrative Contact Country Code: GB

    Administrative Contact Phone Number: +20.79871200

    Administrative Contact Email: hostmaster@uk2.net

    Name Server: ULTRA103.UK2.NET

    Domain Registration Date: Tue Aug 02 08:09:38 GMT 2011



    Registrant City: Dublin

    Registrant State/Province: Ohio

    Registrant Phone Number: +44.6143145107

    Not even a legit US phone number. (If, somehow, area code was 446, it's Colorado, plus the first digit won't be 1 assuming 07 is an extension)

    Why the F are domain registrars allowed to accept this blatantly dishonest crap?
  • Reply 13 of 25
    plovellplovell Posts: 781member
    The "+44" is an internationally-accepted way to specify a phone number in Britain.



    I'm not saying that the number itself is valid, but that *is* the standard way to represent a U.K. phone number in settings such as this. Just so you know.



    The "+20" later on is bogus, to be sure. It also should have the "44" to be valid.
  • Reply 14 of 25
    Do'h! I apologize for being a drooling idiot.

    Well, it's is a cell phone in Columbus OH at least. But someone should have had to confirm a real "Stephanie".



    Frankly, if domain registrars were held legally responsible for doing due diligence in preventing phony personas, scams would get a bit harder.
  • Reply 15 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slang4Art View Post


    Frankly, anyone stupid enough to fall for this deserves what they get.



    Dickhead.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Stourque View Post


    Last post.



    Honestly, what? What in the world makes you think that kind of response is an acceptable reply to what he said?



    Or maybe you fell for it and are lashing out.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member
    Apple already has my credit card details, so why would I supply them again?



    It's like an email from a bank asking for a password, they already have it why would they need it again.



    Sometimes all it needs is a little common sense.
  • Reply 18 of 25
    I'm really sick of hearing about these spammers. I guess if every country in the world sets up a death penalty for spamming will the problem alleviated.
  • Reply 19 of 25
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,113member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OccamsAftershave View Post


    Domain Name: FLOWERPOTSS.BIZ

    Domain ID: D46230628-BIZ

    Sponsoring Registrar: CSL COMPUTER SERVICE (D.B.A. JOKER.COM)

    Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 113

    Registrar URL (registration services): whois.joker.com

    Domain Status: clientTransferProhibited

    Registrant ID: CNEU-210417

    Registrant Name: Stephanie

    Registrant Address1: 5158 Dry Creek Drive

    Registrant City: Dublin

    Registrant State/Province: Ohio

    Registrant Postal Code: 43016

    Registrant Country: United States

    Registrant Country Code: US

    Registrant Phone Number: +44.6143145107

    Registrant Email: ehijie2002@live.com

    Administrative Contact ID: CNEU-9305

    Administrative Contact Name: GET FREE DOMAINS www.uk2.net

    Administrative Contact Organization: UK-2 Ltd

    Administrative Contact Address1: One Canada Square

    Administrative Contact Address2: Canary Wharf

    Administrative Contact City: London

    Administrative Contact State/Province: --

    Administrative Contact Postal Code: E14 5DY

    Administrative Contact Country: UNITED KINGDOM

    Administrative Contact Country Code: GB

    Administrative Contact Phone Number: +20.79871200

    Administrative Contact Email: hostmaster@uk2.net

    Name Server: ULTRA103.UK2.NET

    Domain Registration Date: Tue Aug 02 08:09:38 GMT 2011



    Nice little house you have there, "Stephanie". Could that knock at your front door be the FBI?
  • Reply 20 of 25
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Honestly, what? What in the world makes you think that kind of response is an acceptable reply to what he said?



    Or maybe you fell for it and are lashing out.



    Stourque is right. What the previous poster Slang4Art said is akin to "if she got raped it's her problem she was too skimpily dressed". So I second his harsh words.



    Naivity should not be responded to with "too bad her problem" but education and security features. If I did not know you for your usual intelligent posts, I'd think you scam for a living
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