Apple updates Final Cut Pro X with requested features, offers free trial

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Apple on Tuesday issued a major update for its recently refreshed Final Cut Pro X video editing software, adding features like Xsan and Rich XML support after users expressed dissatisfaction with the newly rebuilt software.



The free update to version 10.0.1 was revealed by Apple in a special page devoted to it its official website. The page highlights new features in the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, including media stems export, Rich XML support, and projects and events on Xsan.



Commenting on the update with Jim Dalrymple of The Loop on Tuesday, Richard Townhill, senior director of applications marketing at Apple, said the features were added after the company received feedback from its users.



"We listened to the pros and have taken their top feature requests and put them in this update," Townhill said.



The full list of features of the new update, which is available free to those who have already purchased Final Cut Pro X, are described by Apple:



Media Stems Export: Traditional, track-based editing systems require you to constantly rearrange and disable tracks to export audio and video stems. With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, flexible metadata removes the burden of track management. Use the new Roles tag to label clips — dialogue, effects, music, and more — then export a single multitrack file or separate stems based on your tags. You can even apply Roles to video clips and graphics for a powerful new way to deliver separate files for versioning and localization.



Rich XML Support: Now you can import and export Final Cut Pro X project and Event information via a rich XML format. XML interchange enables a wide range of third-party workflows, including high-end visual effects, color grading, and media asset management. Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve, Square Box System’s CatDV, and many other third-party applications will offer XML-based workflows with Final Cut Pro X.



Projects and Events on Xsan: Create and edit your Final Cut Pro X projects and Events on Xsan. Ideal for multi-user workflows, you can import media through Final Cut Pro X and place it directly on the SAN. Multiple users can access the same source media, and each editor can create separate projects and Events on the SAN. Users can then edit from any system attached to the SAN, making it easy to move between computers and continue working.



Custom Starting Timecode: Set the start time of your project to a custom timecode value to accommodate color bars and tone, or to meet broadcast delivery specifications.



Full-screen view in Lion: Use every inch of your display when working in Final Cut Pro X. And easily navigate to other applications with a swipe.



One-step Transitions on Connected Clips: Add a transition to a connected clip or between multiple connected clips without manually creating a secondary storyline.



GPU-accelerated export: Harness the power of the GPU on your graphics card to speed up foreground export.



New Theme: Tribute: Access the new Tribute theme, with four animated titles and a matching transition.



Camera Import SDK: Camera manufacturers can use the Camera Import SDK to write plug-ins for importing media from a wide range of cameras. For example, Sony is updating their XDCAM EX plug-in to support native import directly into Final Cut Pro X.

Apple has also promised two new features coming in "early 2012:" multicam editing and broadcast-quality video monitoring. No additional details on those features were provided.



In addition, a new free trial of the software is now available from the official Final Cut Pro X site. Users must enter their name and e-mail address and to be allowed to try the software for 30 days.







Apple also issued an update for Compressor on Tuesday, addressing the following:

Updates the bitrates in Cellular settings for HTTP Live Streaming.

Fixes an issue with accessing QuickTime Export Component settings in Final Cut Pro X.

Fixes an issue in which This Computer cluster does not appear when system is configured in Chinese.

Resolves stability issues when launching Soundtrack Pro after Compressor 4 is installed.

Apple's updates come after the company faced user backlash over the new Final Cut Pro X, released in June. The software was quickly met with condemnation from a group of outspoken professionals who believe the new product is vastly inferior to its predecessor.



Apple made a quick transition to Final Cut Pro X, declaring Final Cut Studio, Express and Server -- which included Final Cut Pro 7 -- as "end of life" products once the latest version was released. AppleInsider first reported in May of 2010 that Apple planned to widen the appeal of Final Cut Pro with features geared toward "prosumers" and more advanced home users.



Faced with growing complaints, Apple resumed sales of the previous, $999 version of Final Cut Studio earlier this month. Orders have only been taken over the phone, and Apple has said it has a "limited quantity" of the end-of-life product. The company has also provided refunds to some dissatisfied customers.



User discontent over Final Cut Pro X proved to be a gain for rival Adobe and its own video editing software for Mac OS X. The company revealed earlier this month that sales of its Mac video editing products saw a 45 percent boost following the release of Final Cut Pro X.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 114
    Quote:

    Apple has also promised two new features coming in "early 2012:" multicam editing and broadcast-quality video monitoring. No additional details on those features were provided.



    Wow. Apple almost NEVER pre-announces upcoming features like this (WWDC announcements notwithstanding). They're definitely getting out of their comfort zone trying to win over some of the Final Cut Pro users they've riled up over the .0 release.
  • Reply 2 of 114
    But Apple NEVER releases a product until it is as perfect as then possible. Look at cut and paste. They could have released a half-assed version on the first iPhone. But it took them YEARS to figure out how to do it, so they refused to release anything for several years.



    Now they release a product which is lacking?



    Is this a new strategy? Release an incomplete beta and add stuff if, as and when customers scream?



    Isn't that a very Google-like way of going about things?
  • Reply 3 of 114
    Yeah, but Apple didn't make it perfect and exactly like FCP 7, so it's time for the bitchers to start bit chin'.
  • Reply 4 of 114
    But Apple NEVER releases a product until it is as perfect as then possible. Look at cut and paste. They could have released a half-assed version on the first iPhone. But it took them YEARS to figure out how to do it, so they refused to release anything for several years.



    Now they release a product which is lacking?



    Is this a new strategy? Release an incomplete beta and add stuff if, as and when customers scream?



    Isn't that a very Google-like way of going about things?
  • Reply 5 of 114
    Hopefully Apple has learned something from this experience. They have to listen more and they have to be less rash with professional products. Consumers may want a 'faster horse', but professionals know their industries. I applaud Apple shaking off the cobwebs of legacy from NLE but they had to do it more sensitively.



    A free trial of Final Cut Pro X at launch would have taken much of the sting out of what happened. Telling everyone prior to launch that there was a lot missing, it was coming, and that professionals would be better off sticking with Final Cut Pro 7 for the time being and treating Final Cut Pro X as a training tool for future projects would have taken almost all the sting out.



    That, of course, required not declaring the industry standard NLE suite end of life.



    Apple's Achilles heal is a lack of listening. It's what makes them great sometimes, they go their own way, but when taken too far it gets them into sticky situations like this.



    That said, the reaction to FCPX was absurd and hopefully adding in some of this functionality will help recover some of the software's reputation.
  • Reply 6 of 114
    [Deletion of double post. Can't see a way to delete the duplicate. Apologies]
  • Reply 7 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Is this a new strategy? Release an incomplete beta and add stuff if, as and when customers scream?



    Wow, good call, couldn't have said it better myself.



    Call me crazy but they could have released a beta or the free trial at launch and got this kind of feedback before forcing customers to pay $300.
  • Reply 8 of 114
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Wow that was pretty fast. Somebody got their feet held to the fire. A FREE 30 day trial to boot. It looks like the multi-cam might be a bit harder to implement but I bet we will see it shortly.
  • Reply 9 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    But Apple NEVER releases a product until it is as perfect as then possible. Look at cut and paste. They could have released a half-assed version on the first iPhone. But it took them YEARS to figure out how to do it, so they refused to release anything for several years.



    Now they release a product which is lacking?



    Is this a new strategy? Release an incomplete beta and add stuff if, as and when customers scream?



    Isn't that a very Google-like way of going about things?



    You start with a good point, and then ignore your own observation...



    Google would have put XML exchange, multi-cam editing, etc. in the lab section and let users deal with the errors. And just as with the iPhone (and also the first version of the revamped iMovie back then), Apple left features out which were not ready. Same thing, and not Google-like at all.



    FCP X is not lacking, it is a complete re-write, and they left stuff out that was not ready. Nothing wrong with that. As many times before, they simply failed at communication. They told editors about all the great new stuff (which is definitely there, and definitely amazing - the time we save with X must be measured in days, not hours). But we rarely need multi-cam editing, we do not use Pro Tools, and we do not exchange data with other NLEs - of course there are editors who do need that. And to them, a detailed list of initially unavailable features should have been made available before they buy.



    I know that there were some miffed professionals, but the majority would have understood the deal, if Apple would have explained it properly. It is one thing to sell consumers a phone without MMS or copy/paste (I have barely used either since iOS has it), but selling pros an update that does less requires a big fat advanced notice.
  • Reply 10 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gmcalpin View Post


    Wow. Apple almost NEVER pre-announces upcoming features like this (WWDC announcements notwithstanding). They're definitely getting out of their comfort zone trying to win over some of the Final Cut Pro users they've riled up over the .0 release.



    They basically announced these features would be added back weeks ago. All they are doing here is a 'no we didn't forget'



    And that they turned this around rather quickly makes me wonder if the 'based on feedback' was just PR spin and this was always the plan and the timetable. The issue may have been legal and not tech on the two missing items which is why they are still missing.



    Note that despite supposedly vast feedback, they have done nothing about the importing of previous FCP projects. If they really are caving to feedback that should have been first on the list



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jonamac View Post


    . . . and that professionals would be better off sticking with Final Cut Pro 7 for the time being and treating Final Cut Pro X as a training tool for future projects would have taken almost all the sting out.



    True professionals don't need to be told this. It is their SOP.



    If we could look at the numbers we could find that they tell a much different story that the bitching and moaning suggests. There may have been more folks downloading this new version having done their homework and understanding the score than those that expected FCP7 just off the MAS and bitching all over the place that they didn't get it. It could turn out that most of the folks bitching about this or that missing feature don't even need it. They just want it in the name of getting their money's worth etc. Who knows. apple rarely releases numbers and if they did after the bitching folks would accuse them of PR spin and/or flat lying
  • Reply 11 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Look at cut and paste. They could have released a half-assed version on the first iPhone. But it took them YEARS to figure out how to do it, so they refused to release anything for several years.



    Stop exagerating things. Apple have their priorities to implement that time like iOS SDK, App store, etc. I'm actually amaze that they prioritize those first. It's so ambitious like it was never done SO RIGHT before and look how it went so well and how the apps are maturing today? Imagine if they release the sdk and app store LATER? also, Apple is not the type of hiring bunch of not-so-talented people to work with.
  • Reply 12 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    Note that despite supposedly vast feedback, they have done nothing about the importing of previous FCP projects. If they really are caving to feedback that should have been first on the list





    That probably won't and shouldn't happen. If you have legacy projects, it means you should own a legacy copy of FCP7 to open and edit them with. If you are that desperate to continue a project in FCPX, the new XML import/export features will help with that transition to the extent that is necessary.
  • Reply 13 of 114
    rob55rob55 Posts: 1,255member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    Note that despite supposedly vast feedback, they have done nothing about the importing of previous FCP projects. If they really are caving to feedback that should have been first on the list



    But didn't they say that was one thing that most likely wouldn't happen (or am I recalling incorrectly)?



    BTW, it's a 1.44 GB update.
  • Reply 14 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by theguycalledtom View Post


    That probably won't and shouldn't happen. If you have legacy projects, it means you should own a legacy copy of FCP7 to open and edit them with. If you are that desperate to continue a project in FCPX, the new XML import/export features will help with that transition to the extent that is necessary.



    Yes but it was THE biggest stink of the naysaying. Which is rather my point. If this was all about feedback as various blogs are implying, this issue would have been the first addressed. And not via using third party software as this XML export/import requires
  • Reply 15 of 114
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post


    But we rarely need multi-cam editing, we do not use Pro Tools, and we do not exchange data with other NLEs - of course there are editors who do need that. And to them, a detailed list of initially unavailable features should have been made available before they buy.



    The biggest complaint which still goes unaddressed is the inability to open previous projects. That is something that every professional needed.
  • Reply 16 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post


    You start with a good point, and then ignore your own observation...



    Google would have put XML exchange, multi-cam editing, etc. in the lab section and let users deal with the errors. And just as with the iPhone (and also the first version of the revamped iMovie back then), Apple left features out which were not ready. Same thing, and not Google-like at all.



    FCP X is not lacking, it is a complete re-write, and they left stuff out that was not ready. Nothing wrong with that. As many times before, they simply failed at communication. They told editors about all the great new stuff (which is definitely there, and definitely amazing - the time we save with X must be measured in days, not hours). But we rarely need multi-cam editing, we do not use Pro Tools, and we do not exchange data with other NLEs - of course there are editors who do need that. And to them, a detailed list of initially unavailable features should have been made available before they buy.



    I know that there were some miffed professionals, but the majority would have understood the deal, if Apple would have explained it properly. It is one thing to sell consumers a phone without MMS or copy/paste (I have barely used either since iOS has it), but selling pros an update that does less requires a big fat advanced notice.



    @dryfus2



    Exactly, a voice of reason. I agree completely. Apple's strength is in making great decisions that advance the state of the art without getting bogged down in lowest common denominator focus groups. Their weakness is in communicating, they are lousy communicators. I am an Apple fan, but the truth is the truth.



    Now if only I could get them to hear me like they heard the FCP users and make iPhoto libraries and iTunes libraries universal on my iMac so that my whole family has managed access to the libraries and I don't have to have multiple copies of the same song or photo on my iMac's hard drive and the photos and songs are usable by all family members. Sometimes I think there aren't very many family people working at Apple or they are all rich enough to give each family member their own computer connected to a central Mac server in their house.



    Probably the latter, especially with Apple's success.
  • Reply 17 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


    Yes but it was THE biggest stink of the naysaying. Which is rather my point.



    True, you can usually distinguish the irrational complaints against FCPX when this is their number one pet peeve.
  • Reply 18 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    But Apple NEVER releases a product until it is as perfect as then possible. Look at cut and paste. They could have released a half-assed version on the first iPhone. But it took them YEARS to figure out how to do it, so they refused to release anything for several years.



    Now they release a product which is lacking?



    Is this a new strategy?





    Apple doesn't release half-finished features, they leave them out. Like cut and paste. And like the missing features of Final Cut Pro X.
  • Reply 19 of 114
    So, no one's going to mention that the ability to open a FCP 7 file requires a $400 plugin?
  • Reply 20 of 114
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RegurgitatedCoprolite View Post


    Yeah, but Apple didn't make it perfect and exactly like FCP 7, so it's time for the bitchers to start bit chin'.



    Wow, you have absolutely no idea of what is going on with this, do you? There are serious issues with the first release of FCPX that make it impossible to work with. So yes, that is not exactly like FCP7. And if we complain, you call us "bitchers". Pathetic!
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