Apple opens up replacement program for first-gen iPod nano

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Apple has initiated a replacement program for the first-generation iPod nano due to issues with the device's battery overheating.



The Cupertino, Calif.-based iPod maker first acknowledged the issue in 2008, offering replacements to customers who experienced overheating. The defect prompted investigations from several international government agencies, including South Korea, Japan and Europe.



In 2010, the trade ministry in Japan ordered Apple to publicize the replacement offer on its Japanese website.



MacRumors reports that Apple began sending out emails to purchasers of the first-generation iPod nano on Friday, notifying them of the replacement program.



"Apple has determined that, in very rare cases, the battery in the iPod nano (1st generation) may overheat and pose a safety risk. Affected iPod nanos were sold between September 2005 and December 2006," the company wrote. "This issue has been traced to a single battery supplier that produced batteries with a manufacturing defect. While the possibility of an incident is rare, the likelihood increases as the battery ages."



The company now recommends that users stop using their first-generation iPod nanos and order a replacement. Customers can bring their iPod nanos an Apple Retail Store or an Apple Authorized Service Provider for help securing a replacement. They can also order a new unit via the web. Replacements will take approximately six weeks to arrive.



An American's iPod nano after a fire. | Image credits: The Consumerist.



The fact that the likelihood of overheating increases over time explains why Apple chose to publicize the program now, more than six years after the first affected devices hit the market. iPod-related fire incidents have been reported since as early as 2005, though the Consumer Product Safety Commission ruled several years ago the the incidences weren't common enough to warrant a full recall.



Apple had previously said that less than 0.001 percent of first-generation iPod nanos experienced the overheating issue, but it has yet to indicate how much that percentage has increased over time.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 60
    Wonder if I can trade mine in for store credit...
  • Reply 2 of 60
    I use mine daily with my iHone 1H9 for bedtime podcasts. dropped it last year and the screen doesn't work. I don't want a newer one for the sole reason that at the end of each podcast, it continues onto the next one. With the 1g after a podcast finishes you have to manually select the next podcast.
  • Reply 3 of 60
    Wow, a replacement program for a 6-year-old iPod model. Sweet.
  • Reply 4 of 60
    I just filled out the form to get my iPod replacement. It said they will send me a shipping box, but no other information on what iPod I will get as a replacement. Does anyone know?
  • Reply 5 of 60
    Every 1st gen and what they replacing with? Maybe it's worth to get one on eBay.
  • Reply 6 of 60
    Im guessing that you'll get an identical model to the one you sent in.



    They will probably be refurbished stock with a new battery.



    I dug out my old one and ill let people know when I'm done with the whole exchange process.
  • Reply 7 of 60
    All they have to do is get in the first batch and start fixing them then use those as replacements for the others that are coming in.
  • Reply 8 of 60
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    @ Mac Write,



    Regarding your quote, was that part of the King short story or part of the screenplay adapted from the short story?
  • Reply 9 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by emulator View Post


    Every 1st gen and what they replacing with? Maybe it's worth to get one on eBay.





    I thought the same thing till I check on eBay...$35+ no thanks...



    Too bad my nano is long gone...got the email from apple about it like 2 hours ago too..
  • Reply 10 of 60
    ikolikol Posts: 369member
    I wish I could get Apple to give me replacements for my second and fourth generation iPods with their busted hard drives that were built with obsolescence that seemed to be planned.
  • Reply 11 of 60
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    Do they replace it with a 6th gen?



    They can't have 1st gens just Laying around
  • Reply 12 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Andysol View Post


    They can't have 1st gens just Laying around



    Of course they can. The same way they can fix hardware problems seven years after release.
  • Reply 13 of 60
    ikolikol Posts: 369member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Of course they can. The same way they can fix hardware problems seven years after release.



    And yet my 5 year old iMac can't run Lion. I now have to buy a new iMac if I want my music in the cloud.
  • Reply 14 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iKol View Post


    And yet my 5 year old iMac can't run Lion. I now have to buy a new iMac if I want my music in the cloud.



    Yes, that's what happens when architectures change. Apple's dispassionately weeding out old code. Eventually even 32-bit chipsets will be unsupported.
  • Reply 15 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mafoo View Post


    Im guessing that you'll get an identical model to the one you sent in.



    They will probably be refurbished stock with a new battery.



    Actually it's more likely that it's a new unit with a new battery custom made just for this replacement. Which is why it is going to take six weeks for it to arrive.



    There are a handful of states that require that you have the ability to service electronic items for as long as 7 years even at customer cost so due to that they would still have the parts around but they likely haven't bothered to do the assembly
  • Reply 16 of 60
    ikolikol Posts: 369member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Yes, that's what happens when architectures change. Apple's dispassionately weeding out old code. Eventually even 32-bit chipsets will be unsupported.



    Where's the trade up program needed?
  • Reply 17 of 60
    Why all this angst and conjecture over this replacement program. Be happy that you can get a FREE replacement for an 'ancient' product by electronics standards. It's not like you have options and you'll get the details soon enough when Apple provides more details or starts shipping the replacements.
  • Reply 18 of 60
    tipootipoo Posts: 843member
    Anyone know if they are fixing them, or replacing them with new Nano's? Seems unlikey that they have a stockpile of first gen Nanos left, and there is a warning for anyone with a custom engraving, so I'm guessing you get a brand spanking new Nano...Now time to find mine in some deep closet
  • Reply 19 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tipoo View Post


    Anyone know if they are fixing them, or replacing them with new Nano's?



    Does Toyota give you a free 2012 model if your 2005 model has a bad battery? We won't be getting free brand new iPod nanos.



    Quote:

    Seems unlikey that they have a stockpile of first gen Nanos left



    Apple keeps in reserve parts for devices up to seven years old (nine in California) for fixes. Rest assured, they'll have plenty.



    Quote:

    and there is a warning for anyone with a custom engraving



    Probably because the back just can't be replaced after it's opened.
  • Reply 20 of 60
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    We won't be getting free brand new iPod nanos.



    But it would be much faster and easier for everyone.
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