RIM, Nokia, and Apple provides Indian government with backdoor to their OSes?

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
a relatively new post; neither (re)confirmed nor denied by other sources, yet

https://twitter.com/#!/csoghoian/sta...24871009468416



person who wrote the tweet http://www.dubfire.net/

ZDNet picked up the story two days ago http://www.zdnet.com/blog/india/have...lular-comm/838

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 2
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,299member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post


    a relatively new post; neither (re)confirmed nor denied by other sources, yet

    https://twitter.com/#!/csoghoian/sta...24871009468416



    person who wrote the tweet http://www.dubfire.net/

    ZDNet picked up the story two days ago http://www.zdnet.com/blog/india/have...lular-comm/838



    It wouldn't be a huge surprise if true. There's been numerous issues around the world when mobile companies have attempted to close their users communications to governments. BB in particular has had to cave to some authorities in the Mideast, and perhaps India too, tho I can''t remember for certain.



    Anyone who thinks their mobile activities, emails, texts and phone calls can't be monitored by some government agency with cooperation from the providers like Apple, RIM, Nokia, telcos, etc, isn't facing reality



    EDIT: Yes, India is one of those that insists it's intelligence agency has access to communications of mobile devices sold in the country.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-0...ification.html
  • Reply 2 of 2
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    I think we need to remember what a back door is. It is secret access hidden from the world. These are governments saying give us explicit access to the network stream content. It is very front door, and just illustrates the differences in what amount of privacy a government allows its citizens.



    This is about explicitly allowing "wiretaps" to be able to access unencrypted or decryption of network streams. Seeing as more apps/functionality are implementing encryption for privacy, that becomes a problem for governments that don't believe that encryption privacy a legal right. So rather than a back door, this will ensure there is some way for the government to access decryption keys.



    Unfortunately, as soon as that is allowed in software for those privacy-adverse governments, basic security can potentially break to make that same capability available to other governments and malicious criminals.
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