Third-gen iPad reportedly shows inaccurate battery level while charging

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014


A report alleges that the third-generation iPad continues to draw a significant amount of wattage after displaying a "100%" battery level, and claims that the device actually finishes the charging cycle some two hours after "prematurely reporting" a full charge.



The finding comes from a follow-up test by DisplayMate President Dr. Raymond Soneira, who conducted an in-depth analysis of the new iPad's Retina Display earlier this week, and claims in an e-mail to AppleInsider that a mathematical charge rate model may be the cause of false on-screen battery indicator readings.



Soneira's findings have not been corroborated and thus may not reflect all third-generation iPads, though it seems that the problem is not hardware related and instead has to do with the device's programmed charge rate.



In his investigation, Soneira found that the iPad continued to draw 10 watts of electricity for two hours after indicating 100% charge, then began to reduce power for an additional ten minutes until a precipitous decline in power draw signaled the termination of the charging cycle.



Soneira offers this explanation:

Quote:

The charge indicator on all mobile devices is based on a mathematical model of the charge rates, discharge rates, and recent discharge history of the battery. It uses this information to estimate how much running time is left. It's actually rather difficult to do because most batteries degrade slowly as they discharge and then tend to surprise with a precipitous decline near the end.



He goes on to say that there may be a fault in the battery charge mathematical model in the new iPad as the indicator should not read 100% until it's power draw switches from 10 watts to a trickle charge of about 1 watt.





Apple claims the Wi-Fi version (left) can browse the web for 10 hours, while the 4G model (right) can get 9 hours on a cell network. | Source: Apple







It is unclear whether the iPad's battery level indicator shows an inaccurate level throughout the entire charging process or if the issue is limited to the final stages directly before the power management chip initiates a trickle charge.



While Apple boasts that in spite of its power hungry components like the high-resolution Retina Display and A5X processor, the third-generation iPad's battery life is similar to that of the iPad 2. These claims are no doubt based on a fully charged unit, and the newly-discovered indicator issue could confuse some customers into thinking their device is not performing up to advertised standards.



Apple launched the latest iPad on March 16 and announced on Monday that unit sales had reached the 3 million in less than four days. The company continued its fastest international iPad rollout ever on Friday as the tablet went on sale in an additional 25 countries and territories.



[ View article on AppleInsider ]

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,166member
    Ooooooo.... Charge-Gate!
  • Reply 2 of 64
    OMFG



    I am calling my lawyer (who prefers to be called an attorney for some dumbshit reason) right now.
  • Reply 3 of 64
    asciiascii Posts: 5,774member
    I don't know why there can't be some sort of hardware gadget that reports how charged the battery is, why does the OS need to build a mathematical model and work off that? We all know how well that works for the weather.
  • Reply 4 of 64
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,326member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post


    I am calling my lawyer (who prefers to be called an attorney for some dumbshit reason) right now.



    The laugh you got out of me from that actually devolved into a cackle. I just really like the idea of some poor uninformed person saying that.
  • Reply 5 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post


    OMFG



    I am calling my lawyer (who prefers to be called an attorney for some dumbshit reason) right now.



    You should. I hear Apple is made of money. By the time the class action suit is settled some 3 years from now, you'll get $15 for your trouble, and your lawyer (or attorney for some dumbshit reason) will get a new 35ft. boat and a Porsche Cayenne Turbo to tow it.
  • Reply 6 of 64
    campercamper Posts: 30member
    Apple really needs to do a better job with their initial hardware designs . It is obvious to me that the Apple fans really love whatever Apple releases but I, for one, have purchased a first-gen Apple hardware design, and I will never do it again. There are too many, ummm, quirks, present.



    Apple apparently releases beta-level hardware as production-level releases.



    Didn't Microsoft have the same reputation for their OS release?
  • Reply 7 of 64
    rokradrokrad Posts: 143member
    I read somewhere that someone said the reason for this is because you will never have 100% unless its currently plugged in. So the second it is removed the battery is then 99% or 98% so they compensate the top 10% battery reading so it stays high I believe.



    Supposedly.... just something I read.



    Oh and it also applies to all technology batteries not just the iPad.
  • Reply 8 of 64
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post


    OMFG



    I am calling my lawyer (who prefers to be called an attorney for some dumbshit reason) right now.



    Lawyers have a number of naming conventions that they rotate through as each gets a horrific reputation with the general public and clients.



    Everybody knows that 'lawyers' are greedy pricks, so they now prefer to be called attorneys. After that will be solicitors. Then legal representatives, etc, etc... You get the picture.



    Eventually, they'll rotate back to being lawyers once the social stigma has worn off.



    Naturally, it's business as usual with no change in actual behavior at any point.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,178member
    so what exactly makes this guy a 'display expert' and how exactly did he do this analysis. I sure hope it wasn't the same technique as Consumer Reports, which is to 'test' one unit and assume that that is identical to the millions of others.
  • Reply 10 of 64
    Today was the first time I drained the battery all the way to shutdown.

    I plugged the iPad into the 10W charger.

    5 hours later, it was showing 48%.

    I am never letting it drain again



    Other than the charge time, I love the new iPad!

    I am constantly showing off the screen.

    The speed with LTE is awesome!
  • Reply 11 of 64
    So you didn't buy the iPad or iPad 2? You realize every single device Apple releases is a new hardware design. It may not appear externally but the engineering inside is much more complex. Also, this is software, if it's even a real issue, not hardware.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camper View Post


    Apple really needs to do a better job with their initial hardware designs . It is obvious to me that the Apple fans really love whatever Apple releases but I, for one, have purchased a first-gen Apple hardware design, and I will never do it again. There are too many, ummm, quirks, present.



    Apple apparently releases beta-level hardware as production-level releases.



    Didn't Microsoft have the same reputation for their OS release?



  • Reply 12 of 64
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,558member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Applecation View Post


    Today was the first time I drained the battery all the way to shutdown.

    I plugged the iPad into the 10W charger.

    5 hours later, it was showing 48%.

    I am never letting it drain again



    Other than the charge time, I love the new iPad!

    I am constantly showing off the screen.

    The speed with LTE is awesome!



    I know there are practical limits... But I miss the fast charging from my first gen iPad. Love the screen though!!
  • Reply 13 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokrad View Post


    I read somewhere that someone said the reason for this is because you will never have 100% unless its currently plugged in. So the second it is removed the battery is then 99% or 98% so they compensate the top 10% battery reading so it stays high I believe.



    Supposedly.... just something I read.



    Oh and it also applies to all technology batteries not just the iPad.



    Exactly. If you take an iPhone off its charger, does it not say 100% for a while after? Obviously if you're using battery power, it can't really be at 100%. This issue is nothing new. Apple has said in the past that even iPhones continue to trickle-charge after it says it has reached 100%.
  • Reply 14 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camper View Post


    Apple really needs to do a better job with their initial hardware designs . It is obvious to me that the Apple fans really love whatever Apple releases but I, for one, have purchased a first-gen Apple hardware design, and I will never do it again. There are too many, ummm, quirks, present.



    Apple apparently releases beta-level hardware as production-level releases.



    Didn't Microsoft have the same reputation for their OS release?



    What makes more sense? That millions of Apple customers don't have issues or that millions of people have problems, but choose to ignore the problems because they are Apple fans and YOU are the lone voice of reason?



    You have to get over yourself, friend. The devices work. In two weeks, each of these items will fade away strangely with no action from Apple because they are non-issues. I mean, iPad 4G maxes data plans when watching video?
  • Reply 15 of 64
    hobbithobbit Posts: 532member
    Isn't the battery still being conditioned during the first few charge cycles?

    Aren't the on-board electronics and charge software still adapting to the battery and vice versa?



    I think it takes a couple of charge cyles untill the % figures become reasonably accurate.
  • Reply 16 of 64
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hobBIT View Post


    Isn't the battery still being conditioned during the first few charge cycles?

    Aren't the on-board electronics and charge software still adapting to the battery and vice versa?



    I think it takes a couple of charge cyles untill the % figures become reasonably accurate.



    I'm familiar with conditioning LiIon batteries but I thought this was done at the factory with the first charge being 100%.



    I guess that isn't always the case:
    Quote:

    Step 1: Initial Charge



    Fully charge the battery overnight using your computer's AC adapter. We highly recommend allowing the initial charge to be at least 12 hours, no matter what the percentage of charge is displayed in the Battery menu. This will extend the life of the battery to its maximum. You may use the computer during this time, but DO NOT interrupt the charge cycle by unplugging the AC adapter.





    Ps: Eternal Emperor doesn't post enough.
  • Reply 17 of 64
    kent909kent909 Posts: 691member
    At the end of the day, 99% of the time, my new iPad is somewhere between 20 and 80% battery life left. I plug it into the charger and the next morning it is at 100%. Just like my first iPad always was. I am sure glad I don't have his problem. Then again I am not looking as hard as he is to find something wrong.
  • Reply 18 of 64
    I have a really bummed out new iPad. It doesn't seem to heat up all that much, wifi connections have had no issues at all, and the darn thing seems to charge (and discharge) no differently than my iPad 1 or iPad 2.



    In fact, other than for an amazingly better screen and substantially higher speed, it is no different.



    Maybe I should return mine -- something is clearly wrong.
  • Reply 19 of 64
    adamcadamc Posts: 547member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camper View Post


    Apple really needs to do a better job with their initial hardware designs . It is obvious to me that the Apple fans really love whatever Apple releases but I, for one, have purchased a first-gen Apple hardware design, and I will never do it again. There are too many, ummm, quirks, present.



    Apple apparently releases beta-level hardware as production-level releases.



    Didn't Microsoft have the same reputation for their OS release?



    Get off the high horse.



    Btw Apple don't need your support they have tons of money and MS may need you to support them sooner than later so don't let the door hit you on the way out.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    Yeah, the gas gauge in my car also reports it is full when I can still add another gallon or two AND shows empty when I can drive another 100 miles ...
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