Samsung smartphone shipments estimated at 52M, doubling Apple's iPhone

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A new estimate pegs Samsung's smartphone shipments for the second quarter of calendar 2012 at 52.1 million, which would be twice the 26 million iPhones Apple sold during the same period.

Samsung has not publicly disclosed its smartphone shipments for the quarter, but U.K.-based Juniper Research announced on Thursday that its data suggests Samsung shipped more than 52 million smartphones during the three-month span. Its research suggests Samsung has taken a "sizable lead in the smartphone market in terms of unit shipments."

The report cited Samsung's new flagship Galaxy S III as having played a "key role" in Samsung's success, with estimated shipments of 10 million during the second quarter.

Apple announced in its quarterly earnings report on Tuesday that it sold 26 million iPhones in the June quarter, representing 28 percent unit growth year over year. Investors expected Apple would have sold closer to 28 million iPhones during the quarter, and viewed the result as a disappointment.

A slowdown in iPhone growth has been largely attributed to anticipation of Apple's next-generation handset, which is expected to arrive this fall. Apple executives acknowledged this week that rumors of upcoming products likely affected sales during the June quarter.

Galaxy


Following the launch of the iPhone 4S late last year, Apple took the crown of the world's largest smartphone vendor, besting Samsung with sales of 37 million iPhones during the holiday quarter of 2011. But Samsung was estimated to have retaken the top spot, in terms of total smartphone shipments, in the March quarter of this year.

Juniper Research said Thursday that Apple "will undoubtedly narrow the gap" with Samsung later this year, when its next-generation iPhone is expected to arrive.

The sales figures demonstrate once again how the smartphone market has increasingly become a two-horse race between Apple and Samsung. Juniper Research estimates that Research in Motion shipped 7.4 million smartphones in the second quarter, while HTC is pegged at 11.6 million and Nokia at 10.2 million.

A total of 132.9 million smartphones are estimated to have been shipped in the second quarter of calendar 2012. That's up from 105.2 million in the same period a year ago.

While Samsung is estimated to have taken the lead in smartphone shipments, Apple still remains undisputed in terms of profitability. In the June quarter, Apple saw its third-quarter profits reach $8.8 billion, driven largely by the iPhone, while Samsung saw company-wide profits of $5.9 billion during the same period.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 204
    phalanxphalanx Posts: 109member


    Nothing better than some healthy competition!!!!   

  • Reply 2 of 204
    woodlinkwoodlink Posts: 198member


    Of course, this headline will be meaningless when the iPhone 5 is released.

  • Reply 3 of 204
    markbyrnmarkbyrn Posts: 586member


    Err AI, shipments versus sold?  Apples to Oranges?  At any rate, other than seeing tech pundits like Leo Laporte shilling for the Galaxy S III, I've only seen one in the wild.  Where's the hordes of crowds who bought and carry it around?  

  • Reply 4 of 204
    markbyrnmarkbyrn Posts: 586member


    BTW AI, have you thought about doing some investigative journalism on these fantastical claims by Samsung/Google?  I work at a major airport in Florida and when running a simple network scan on the free Wi-Fi service, it invariably shows about 90% connections from Apple devices vice anything else.  Where are all these Android phones hiding?

  • Reply 5 of 204


    This seems like a fun game people are playing. Samsung sold double the number of phones than the iPhone. Never mind the actual disparity in the number of models (3 iPhones vs. a s**t-load of Samsung phones).


     


    What other comparisons are they going to do next? The number of hatchbacks have outsold the number of Rolls Royces this quarter?


     


    Dozens of models of smart phones outselling 3 phones is not newsworthy. 2 tablets outselling dozens of other tablet models is.

  • Reply 6 of 204
    tawilsontawilson Posts: 484member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post


    This seems like a fun game people are playing. Samsung sold double the number of phones than the iPhone. Never mind the actual disparity in the number of models (3 iPhones vs. a s**t-load of Samsung phones).


     


    What other comparisons are they going to do next? The number of hatchbacks have outsold the number of Rolls Royces this quarter?


     


    Dozens of models of smart phones outselling 3 phones is not newsworthy. 2 tablets outselling dozens of other tablet models is.



     


    This seems like a fun game people are playing. Samsung shipped double the number of phones than the iPhone.


     


    There, fixed it for you.

  • Reply 7 of 204
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 42,836member




    Originally Posted by phalanx View Post

    Nothing better than some healthy competition!!!!   


     


    Let us know when competition exists.


     



    Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

    Of course, this headline will be meaningless when the iPhone 5 is released.


     


    But it's already out.

  • Reply 8 of 204
    jmgregory1jmgregory1 Posts: 448member


    What does this really matter?  Is it really a game that has a winner or loser?  So if Samsung sold 52 million phones spread between what, 10 models, 5 models - whatever the number, it's still meaningless.  They push these things out as if it's a sign of doom for either company and that's just total crap.


     


    And I just don't buy the argument that competition forces innovation - at least I am not convinced that is the case with Apple.  Do you really think the Apple designers and engineers are just waiting for this news, before they think, "well maybe I should actually do something innovative today"?  I would guess the same is true for Samsung or Google or whoever.


     


    A company I used to work for made the argument that the design team shouldn't shop competitors products or care at all about what is going on in the marketplace, because that just taints their own vision of what they should be doing creatively.  Of course that was back when the company was run by the creative founder who recognized that chasing after the competition made you a follower, not a leader.  Since the company sold, they're now spending more time trying to design for the customer based upon what's already in the market, following the sage words of the new ceo who's background is being a financial analyst and consultant.

  • Reply 9 of 204
    cvaldes1831cvaldes1831 Posts: 1,832member
    markbyrn wrote: »
    BTW AI, have you thought about doing some investigative journalism on these fantastical claims by Samsung/Google?  I work at a major airport in Florida and when running a simple network scan on the free Wi-Fi service, it invariably shows about 90% connections from Apple devices vice anything else.  Where are all these Android phones hiding?
    Android phones are adopted by a younger demographic and are typically the first smartphones when users switch from feature phones. That usually means the 18-25 year old crowd. Also, a huge number of Android handsets are cheapo touch screens sold in southeast Asia, that largely function as touch screen feature phones since there is little app purchasing and activity from that region.

    You'll find a lot more Android handsets at schools.

    Air travelers are a pretty different demographic for the majority of the year. A big percentage of normal air travelers fall into that prime consumer demographic: 30-59, college educated professional, excellent amount of disposable income, especially outside of the seasonal holiday travel.
  • Reply 10 of 204
    It looks like they have learned from the lefties play book. Tell a lie often enough and long enough it becomes their truth.
  • Reply 11 of 204
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 698member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post





     Also, a huge number of Android handsets are cheapo touch screens sold in southeast Asia, that largely function as touch screen feature phones since there is little app purchasing and activity from that region.

     


    So how are these smartphones that should be compared to the iPhone?

    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }

     


    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }

     


    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }

     


    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }

     
  • Reply 12 of 204
    woodlinkwoodlink Posts: 198member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Let us know when competition exists.


     


     


    But it's already out.



     


     


    What's "already out"?

  • Reply 13 of 204
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 42,836member


    Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

    What's "already out"?


     


    The 5th iPhone.

  • Reply 14 of 204
    chudqchudq Posts: 43member


    Remember Apple has never been aimed at whatever #1 in PC or mobile phone. What Apple wnats is to design the best products for users they love. If they love, they will be buy, if not , they would not. That's so simple! The reality is that Apple is a developer and others just copy and follow the trend to make money. That's not health competition!

  • Reply 15 of 204
    freshmakerfreshmaker Posts: 506member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    The 5th iPhone.



    Which isn't the iPhone 5.

  • Reply 16 of 204
    sleepy3sleepy3 Posts: 244member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post


     


     


    And I just don't buy the argument that competition forces innovation - at least I am not convinced that is the case with Apple.  Do you really think the Apple designers and engineers are just waiting for this news, before they think, "well maybe I should actually do something innovative today"?  I would guess the same is true for Samsung or Google or whoever.


     


    A company I used to work for made the argument that the design team shouldn't shop competitors products or care at all about what is going on in the marketplace, because that just taints their own vision of what they should be doing creatively.  Of course that was back when the company was run by the creative founder who recognized that chasing after the competition made you a follower, not a leader.  Since the company sold, they're now spending more time trying to design for the customer based upon what's already in the market, following the sage words of the new ceo who's background is being a financial analyst and consultant.



     


    You are missing something though.


     


    Apple does not operate in a vacuum. They very much do see what competitors have. And they very much do take ideas from competitors and put into their own products along with the original stuff that they come up with themselves.


     


    Any company that operates in a bubble without keeping an eye on what the competition is doing will soon be dead. 


     


    Matter of fact, Apple even regularly sends employees to events like CES where they have no booth even, just to see what the competition is up to. 

  • Reply 17 of 204


    Let's not forget what happened to the last largest mobile phone producer, Nokia. You can make, ship, or sell the most phones in the world, but if you don't make money from it, what's the point? Also, how is Samsung spending about half what Apple is on CPUs, yet producing more smartphones than Apple's entire lineup of products? Something's fishy.

  • Reply 18 of 204
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 42,836member


    Originally Posted by Freshmaker View Post

    Which isn't the iPhone 5.


     


    Of course it is. It is by definition. The next iPhone isn't the iPhone 5, also by definition.

  • Reply 19 of 204
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,163member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post


    BTW AI, have you thought about doing some investigative journalism on these fantastical claims by Samsung/Google?  I work at a major airport in Florida and when running a simple network scan on the free Wi-Fi service, it invariably shows about 90% connections from Apple devices vice anything else.  Where are all these Android phones hiding?



    Yeah but you have to remember, people who visit airports generally have money. Android users can't afford to fly, they take the Greyhound ;)


     


    Off topic: Man, I'm just loving this Mountain Lion!!! Best upgrade ever.

  • Reply 20 of 204


    They say 10 million of these Samsungs are Galaxy S3s. I'm curious how many of the remaining 42 million are low end models that end up being free or close to free when subsidized by the carriers. 

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