Phil Schiller says Apple does with its Macs what PC makers are 'afraid' to do

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Apple's aggressive strategy of abandoning legacy hardware like spinning disc drives and hard drives helps set it apart from competitors who are "afraid" to streamline their products, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller believes.

Schiller sat down with Harry McCracken of Time after unveiling his company's new Mac lineup this week. He spoke about the streamlining of Apple's Mac lineup that has gone on for years, most notably the transition to flash-based memory and the abandoning of optical disc drives.

"These old technologies are holding us back," Schiller said. "They're anchors on where we want to go."

While Apple feels features like disc drives have "outlived their useful purpose," he said Windows-based PC competitors are "afraid to remove them."

"We try to find better solutions," Schiller said. "Our customers have given us a lot of trust."

Schiller


McCracken noted that many pundits once assumed Apple would eventually add Blu-ray drives to its computers, though few would still make that case today with high-definition content available through iTunes. The same could be said of those who believed Apple would start making cheaper Macs ??Apple instead released the iPad, which has been eating away at traditional PC sales.

Schiller also reminisced about when some industry watchers thought low-priced netbooks were "the future" of the industry, but Apple rejected them as substandard products.

"Even if the market was going there, we weren't going to chase everybody downhill," he said.

Apple's feelings about netbooks of yesteryear were largely echoed this week about cheap 7-inch tablets like the Google Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HD. This week the company unveiled the iPad mini, with a 7.9-inch display and $329 entry price.

Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook said on Thursday that he views the 7-inch tablets on the market as poor products. He said Apple would "never" make such a cheap product, but instead strives to create devices that people will love for months and years after they purchase it.

"We didn't set out to build a small, cheap tablet," Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer added. "We set out to build a smaller iPad that has the full iPad experience."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 247


    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    "These old technologies are holding us back," Schiller said. "They're anchors on where we want to go."


     


    Good, Phil. Good. This tells us that the new Mac Pro will probably be universally hated by its established market but also will be the best device for the future for those who still buy it.

  • Reply 2 of 247
    Anyone can say what Apple executives say. But their actions show their conviction and the results show they can execute. So yes, they have this customer's trust.
  • Reply 3 of 247


    100% correct.


     


    And the consumer satisfaction numbers, year after year after year, to support it. 

  • Reply 4 of 247


    "Even if the market was going there, we weren't going to chase everybody downhill,"


     


    That attitude keeps them at the top of all technology companies in the world.

  • Reply 5 of 247
    gary54gary54 Posts: 169member


    Now that the mini isn't crippled like it was and now a decently competitive desktop computer, they really need an aggressive marketing campaign to grab those sub-1000 PC buyers who are going to balk at Windoze 8.

  • Reply 6 of 247


    I have to disagree with him on one front. Although I do not use it all the time I love my blu-ray drive (I use the old PS3 more). Watching movies in HD while I am working is sweet (I prefer blu-ray because they normally have better quality, and are cheaper and trade-able). I do like to burn dvds for my grandmother with my niece and nephew. For some many disc drive is two important to trade away like the millions who live in areas with crappy internet connections.

  • Reply 7 of 247
    Never thought Apple would be so straightforward about what they are all about. Don't think the PC makers will change their stance as removing an ODD won't make the box enticingly cheaper, but they might surprise me. Just like people buying Blue-Ray DVD's.

    [IMG ALT=""]http://forums.appleinsider.com/content/type/61/id/15169/width/500/height/1000[/IMG]
  • Reply 8 of 247


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post


    I have to disagree with him on one front. Although I do not use it all the time I love my blu-ray drive (I use the old PS3 more). Watching movies in HD while I am working is sweet (I prefer blu-ray because they normally have better quality, and are cheaper and trade-able). I do like to burn dvds for my grandmother with my niece and nephew. For some many disc drive is two important to trade away like the millions who live in areas with crappy internet connections.


     




     


    Perhaps Schiller should have added the word "generally" to his statement that "disc drives have 'outlived their useful purpose'." It applies to a lot more technologies than just disc drives.


     


    Of course, many customers have special needs and desires. It would be a mistake to attempt to cater to all of them. The ideal is to not preclude them. As usual, in your case Apple doesn't. It isn't difficult to find a Mac-compatible Blu-ray burner.

  • Reply 9 of 247
    gary54gary54 Posts: 169member


    Count how many times in a year when you actually use the ODD. Unless you are in the habit of burning video to disk, it's more become one of those "when you need it, you really need it" deals. The promise of the optical disk is that its a more or less permanent archive of data not subject to the vulnerabilities of hard disk storage. But that is not really the case or the reality. Optical disks get scratched and become unreadable even in ordinary use. I have even had disks stored in hard plastic cases, set on the shelf untouched and somehow in the mean time they became unreadable. If someone really wants a ODD, external units including BR burners are out there.

  • Reply 10 of 247
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,400member


    I agree removing the ODD out of the macs to move forward with technology was a wise move. This is coming from a HD maniac. 


     


    I have a hack with a blu-ray drive in it. I converted all of my blu-rays that I purchased to high quality MKVs so audio and video quality wasn't compromised. I stream that to my Mac Mini with XBMC and Plex. It's so much more convenient than carrying media around. Changing it out, etc.


     


    IMO, for iTunes media to ever be a viable alternative to blu-ray, they need to bump up the quality big time. For that to happen, they're going to average 10-15gb per movie. Sure Comcast will love that!

  • Reply 11 of 247
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,400member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gary54 View Post


    Count how many times in a year when you actually use the ODD. Unless you are in the habit of burning video to disk, it's more become one of those "when you need it, you really need it" deals. The promise of the optical disk is that its a more or less permanent archive of data not subject to the vulnerabilities of hard disk storage. But that is not really the case or the reality. Optical disks get scratched and become unreadable even in ordinary use. I have even had disks stored in hard plastic cases, set on the shelf untouched and somehow in the mean time they became unreadable. If someone really wants a ODD, external units including BR burners are out there.



    I completely agree Gary. In my 2011 MBP, I took out my ODD and replaced it with another hard drive so I could have a dedicated internal time machine back up and bootcamp partition. I use those much more than I ever did the ODD.

  • Reply 12 of 247
    ash471ash471 Posts: 705member
    I think many "blog pundits" misread the purpose behind the iPad mini. They thought it was being released to lower the price point to compete. The real reason was that there are a large number of people that want a much lighter device that is more suitable for reading. Apple delivered a device that weighs slightly less than the Kindle and Nexus 7, while delivering more screen real estate. That's where the value is.
  • Reply 13 of 247


    Sure, why put a spinning disc in a computer when we can charge you more for an external one?

  • Reply 14 of 247
    If by "years after they purchase it" he means 2 years, yes I can believe that considering developers are barely supporting the original iPad anymore.
  • Reply 15 of 247


    Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

    Sure, why put a spinning disc in a computer when we can charge you more for an external one?


     


    Why use a spinning disc when you can use something that won't fail due to the motion required to use it?

  • Reply 16 of 247
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post


    Sure, why put a spinning disc in a computer when we can charge you more for an external one?



    You are putting a bad spin on this. A cheap shot just to be contrary. There are plenty options for Mac users that absolutely need an OD in their laptops. It not really a problem. I'd call it a shrug.

  • Reply 17 of 247
    <span style="font-size:small;line-height:16px;">I have to disagree with him on one front. Although I do not use it all the time I love my blu-ray drive (I use the old PS3 more). Watching movies in HD while I am working is sweet (I prefer blu-ray because they normally have better quality, and are cheaper and trade-able). I do like to burn dvds for my grandmother with my </span>
    <span style="font-size:small;line-height:16px;">niece</span>
    <span style="font-size:small;line-height:16px;"> and nephew. For some many disc drive is two important to trade away like the millions who live in areas with crappy internet connections.</span>
    Agreed. I love my PS3 for Blu-ray and 3-D movies for family night. so for me drives will never go away. I still burn DVDs and CDs for backup and play. And yes I love Apple, In my family we have three iPhones two iPads one AppleTV one iPod touch and 2011 MacBook Pro.
  • Reply 18 of 247

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Why use a spinning disc when you can use something that won't fail due to the motion required to use it?



    Because that's what I have.

  • Reply 19 of 247


    Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

    Because that's what I have.


     


    Then have this, too!

  • Reply 20 of 247


    I have to give Apple points for the Retina Display... nice move... except for web developers who complain that designing visual assets is a complete PIA on Retina screens - because the other 99% of the world isn't run on 200+ dpi/ppi screens.



     



     


     




     


     




     


     




     


     




     


     




     


     


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