Apple to post all WWDC 2013 session videos online for registered developers

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
With a limited number of tickets available to its annual Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple has suggested it will reach the rest of its developer community by posting videos of all sessions while the conference is still underway.

Tracks


Apple made note of the WWDC 2013 presentation videos on the conference's official website, which launched on Wednesday. The company notes that registered Apple developers who can't make it to WWDC will still be able to view all of the sessions "during the conference."

The language used by Apple suggests to Erica Sadun of TUAW that Apple plans to post videos for developers more quickly than it has done in years past. Previously, WWDC sessions videos were posted later in the month, weeks after the conference had ended.

"If so, what this does is ensure that devs, no matter what time zone and budget they're working with, will have quick access to the same conference material as attendees," she said.

In another change for this year's conference, Apple pre-announced the registration time for WWDC 2013, letting prospective attendees know when tickets will become available. Passes for the annual conference typically sell out in a matter of minutes.

Developers hoping to attend WWDC 2013 at San Francisco's Moscone West from June 10 through 14 will be able to purchase tickets worldwide on Thursday at 10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Eastern. The company has promised to get new versions of both iOS and OS X into developers' hands at this year's conference.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Crap.

    I never should have made that decision recently to be underdeveloped.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Note: Registered developers, not necessarily paid developers.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,198member
    If they were really good they would set up a remote system where you could watch the sessions live. Maybe charge a small fee for them. Use something like the Cisco app. Even if you couldn't ask questions etc it might be worth $200/300 to some folks to watch. And then those that either can't or don't want to pay the money could settle for a few days later.
  • Reply 4 of 12
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    charlituna wrote: »
    If they were really good they would set up a remote system where you could watch the sessions live. Maybe charge a small fee for them. Use something like the Cisco app. Even if you couldn't ask questions etc it might be worth $200/300 to some folks to watch. And then those that either can't or don't want to pay the money could settle for a few days later.

    I'm sure they've considered it. But I worry if they can do it for x number of live streams at once when they haven't been able to live streaming from one source all that well in the past. In their defense they do get the sessions up in HD pretty damn quick.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    I'm sure they've considered it. But I worry if they can do it for x number of live streams at once when they haven't been able to live streaming from one source all that well in the past. In their defense they do get the sessions up in HD pretty damn quick.


    I think having thousands of people watching the same live stream is probably much more resource intensive than having several different streams with fewer clients watching each one, even if the total number of clients is the same. Think how many iTunes movies are simultaneously streaming every night.


     


    The main problem I see is that with live or even slightly delayed event streams is that you don't have the opportunity to do any editing. When you are at the conference, the seminars have a fair amount of chit chat, throat clearing, coughing, wise cracking, etc. which is only experienced by the small number of people in attendance and most of that gets edited out for the archive versions. For example I was not that impressed with the quality of the original iTunes U Stanford iOS courses in terms of video editing, although the educational content was excellent.  It will be interesting to see how quickly they can put up finished archive quality videos of the seminars.

  • Reply 6 of 12
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    mstone wrote: »
    I think having thousands of people watching the same live stream is probably much more resource intensive than having several different streams with fewer clients watching each one, even if the total number of clients is the same. Think how many iTunes movies are simultaneously streaming every night.

    The main problem I see is that with live or even slightly delayed event streams is that you don't have the opportunity to do any editing. When you are at the conference, the seminars have a fair amount of chit chat, throat clearing, coughing, wise cracking, etc. which is only experienced by the small number of people in attendance and most of that gets edited out for the archive versions. For example I was not that impressed with the quality of the original iTunes U Stanford iOS courses in terms of video editing, although the educational content was excellent.  It will be interesting to see how quickly they can put up finished archive quality videos of the seminars.

    I would imagine that quality of the live stream without editing was a concern. They certainly have hundreds of videos to make an assessment of the quality without being able to edit.

    I don't agree that doing multiple live streams from the same location could happen while ensuring relative success. iTunes is quite different than a live stream because 1) the content DLed to a point before you can play it, and 2) the content is stored in more than one location so the entire world isn't all trying to access a single location for all the feeds. I doubt Moscone is setup the same way as the Dolby Center.

    How many sessions are running concurrently?
  • Reply 7 of 12
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    I would imagine that quality of the live stream without editing was a concern. They certainly have hundreds of videos to make an assessment of the quality without being able to edit.



    I don't agree that doing multiple live streams from the same location could happen while ensuring relative success. iTunes is quite different than a live stream because 1) the content DLed to a point before you can play it, and 2) the content is stored in more than one location so the entire world isn't all trying to access a single location for all the feeds. I doubt Moscone is setup the same way as the Dolby Center.



    How many sessions are running concurrently?


    I doubt it would be "Live" live, but rather delayed some number of minutes, perhaps long enough to buffer to Akamai. It has to be on demand anyway so people can join in at the beginning of the session regardless of when they want to start watching.

  • Reply 8 of 12
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    mstone wrote: »
    I doubt it would be "Live" live, but rather delayed some number of minutes, perhaps long enough to buffer to Akamai. It has to be on demand anyway so people can join in at the beginning of the session regardless of when they want to start watching.

    In that case I say, "why bother?". They seems to get them up in HD in under a week and it's not like the OSes will be released immediately anyway. I really don't think the delay over the few thousand that got to hear them in person will make a break a developer.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    ktappektappe Posts: 759member

    Quote:

    "If so, what this does is ensure that devs, no matter what time zone and budget they're working with, will have quick access to the same conference material as attendees," she said.


     


    Which is what they should have done years ago. The only reason to restrict the videos would theoretically be to ensure full conference attendance. But it's been sold out for years. And the whole point of the conference is to increase the willingness & ability of developers to enhance the OS X and iOS platforms. So the videos always should have been readily available. 


     


    My best guess is that this harkens back to the Steve Jobs "exclusivity" compulsion. I loved the guy but this was one of his biggest hangups--that of trying to make Apple a clique.

  • Reply 10 of 12
    "Passes for the annual conference typically sell out in a matter of minutes."

    Nope.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by JulieJCO View Post

    Nope.


     


    You don't consider <120 minutes a "matter"?

  • Reply 12 of 12
    pdq2pdq2 Posts: 270member


    On a related topic, I've recently discovered the free CS courses from Stanford on iTunes U. I wish I would have found them earlier. I've tried to teach myself programming from books before, but always struggled - in contrast, these lectures are really good!


     


    I know I'm late to this party, but if you have an interest like I do and haven't checked these (lectures on iTunes U) out yet, I really encourage you to do so.

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