Apple preparing developers for Safari Push Notifications rollout in Mavericks

Posted:
in macOS edited February 2014
In a mass email sent out to developers on Wednesday, Apple said to "get ready" for Safari Push Notifications in OS X Mavericks, a feature set to activate when the next-generation operating system launches this fall.

Push


The email shortly summarizes the Apple Push Notifications Service, which developers can use to send notifications to website users via Safari in OS X Mavericks. A picture of the implementation, seen above, was included in Wednesday's email and also shows up on Apple's Developer webpage.

Safari's push notification service is one of the many additions Mavericks will bring to OS X. Apple notes the service will work in much the same way as app notifications, pointing out that pop-up message boxes will include a website's icon, text and webpage link. In addition, users will be able to receive messages even when Safari isn't running.

As of now, notifications in OS X are limited to apps, accessible from Mountain Lion's Notification Center. Mavericks will for the first time bring Web-based notifications to Apple's desktop OS.

Developers are asked to visit the Safari Push Notifications webpage on Apple's Developer Center portal for further information on how to start implementing the service into their websites.

Currently being seeded to developers in beta form as Developer Previews, OS X 10.9 Mavericks is slated to launch sometime this fall along with a maintenance update for Mountain Lion.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 52
    feynmanfeynman Posts: 1,087member
    Looks like they're getting closer!
  • Reply 2 of 52
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Great. One more way for web page designers to annoy us.

    I'm assuming it can be turned off. I hope that they're not allowed to make it a requirement.
  • Reply 3 of 52
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    I love 10.9 so far (truly, it is gorgeous), but this is simply a fucking annoyance. I hope nobody uses it.
  • Reply 4 of 52
    m01etym01ety Posts: 278member
    I hope it is widely used! Stop being dense, guys. You realize this is opt-in, right?

    If you want a website to let you know stuff even when the browser isn't running, you ask it to do that. It's your choice. It's a service a developer may elect to provide you, for your own damn convenience.

    Why are you making this sound like a system-level spamming service? As if that's something Apple would do.
  • Reply 5 of 52
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member
    This sounds like it will be used basically for pop-up adverts about 99% of the time.

    Visit a website? It sets a cookie that sends you "notifications" every day. It's up to you the end user to figure out what happened and how to get rid of it.
  • Reply 6 of 52
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by m01ety View Post



    I hope it is widely used! Stop being dense, guys. You realize this is opt-in, right?



    If you want a website to let you know stuff even when the browser isn't running, you ask it to do that. It's your choice. It's a service a developer may elect to provide you, for your own damn convenience.



    Why are you making this sound like a system-level spamming service? As if that's something Apple would do.

     

    Since there is as of yet no information about how it will be implemented or if it's possible to send notifications without the users consent, just saying (essentially) "trust Apple!" is not that helpful.  

  • Reply 7 of 52
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by m01ety View Post



    I hope it is widely used! Stop being dense, guys. You realize this is opt-in, right?



    If you want a website to let you know stuff even when the browser isn't running, you ask it to do that. It's your choice. It's a service a developer may elect to provide you, for your own damn convenience.

     

    Are you really that naïve?

     

    Any site will promise you "important updates" and then spam you. Then you can go to a support forum and hope somebody will tell you how to disable that crap.

     

    If I want to be updated by a site, there's RSS. No need to reinvent that.

  • Reply 8 of 52
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    m01ety wrote: »
    I hope it is widely used! Stop being dense, guys. You realize this is opt-in, right?

    If you want a website to let you know stuff even when the browser isn't running, you ask it to do that. It's your choice. It's a service a developer may elect to provide you, for your own damn convenience.

    Why are you making this sound like a system-level spamming service? As if that's something Apple would do.

    Right. Just like popups are supposed to be opt-in, but many sites won't load unless you have them active. Or cookies are supposed to be optional, but many sites don't work unless cookies are active.

    I can picture that lots of sites will require you to turn the notifications on in order to use the site.
  • Reply 9 of 52
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,195moderator
    Mavericks will for the first time bring Web-based notifications to Apple's desktop OS.

    They used to have RSS in Mail, which mostly achieves the same thing, it's just pull notifications vs push.

    This has some advantages over RSS in that breaking news can be seen when it happens without being on a site or refreshing the RSS feed but RSS comes down every few minutes.

    Good for news junkies or maybe sports fans but not for people who prefer to have as few notifications popping up as possible and they'd just turn it off.
  • Reply 10 of 52
    Wow, I'm also surprised by the comments here. You shouldn't be worrying. And it's not a matter of "trusting" Apple. These notifications will be handled by the Notifications section of System Preferences - you know, the one that already gives you a high level of fine-grained control of what can send you notifications and of what type.

    Why do you assume notifications coming from websites would be treated any different than app notifications? It's perfectly logical to assume they'll be treated the same - opt-in. And if you don't like what is getting sent to you, then simply opt-out of that website's notifications, just like you can disable app notifications now.
  • Reply 11 of 52
    Will Apple-insider use this for there updates?

    This has to have good of getting news when you want, but bad of the ads, I figure apple will have settings to rid the ads someway
  • Reply 12 of 52

    PS I don't really care about seeing most news articles as they come in - that would be too distracting. 

     

    But having all the new articles collected in Notification Center, which is literally a swipe away? That sounds absolutely killer.

  • Reply 13 of 52

    The first time I get a Safari notification will be the last time I use Safari.

  • Reply 14 of 52

    another useless feature for the 3 people who still use it, safari is such a fail on desktop that it is now in the "other" section in market share. Apple just needs to let this die.

  • Reply 15 of 52
    akacakac Posts: 510member

    Speaking as someone who uses Mavericks:

     

    1) Its a great feature. Of course some websites will try to spam, but you can just turn them off. Super simple too.

    Examples: Gmail, Weather, etc.. It removes the need for native apps whose sole purpose is to poll a website and provide a notification.

    2) Its completely opt-in per website. 

    3) You can turn it off wholesale in Safari, or per website.

     

    So those of you who say stuff like "first time I get one, I'll stop using Safari" - get real - you'll never ever get one because you'll simply say "No" if asked, or won't click the "Signup for notification" button on the website.

     

    Its NOT automatic.

  • Reply 16 of 52

    I don't think there is any problem with saying, "Trust Apple" on this point.  If you upgrade at all, or for that matter, if you use any operating system by Apple at all, you had better trust them to a certain degree.  The OS has access to all your data, all your passwords, your location, your face, all the sounds you're making and every single keystroke at every moment you make it.  We trust them this far, and yet this isn't even the "trust" that is being suggested that we should give Apple.  At the end of the day, Apple wants you to have a good experience using their computers.  You should "trust" that they aren't going to do something like shove ads in your face in order to get money from advertisers, because their income comes from you, not advertisers (iRadio notwithstanding), and if they piss you off, you'll use something else.

    I can't wait to try Safari's notifications.  I'm not worried in the slightest that I'm going to be bombarded by website notifications I don't want.  Because I know that would be stupid, and annoying, and I also know that Apple makes products that they themselves want to love and enjoy using.

    I find Apple refreshing because their business model is just so simple and traditional.  Make something great, sell it to people for profit because people want to have it.  End of story.

  • Reply 17 of 52
    dreyfus2 wrote: »
    m01ety wrote: »
    I hope it is widely used! Stop being dense, guys. You realize this is opt-in, right?


    If you want a website to let you know stuff even when the browser isn't running, you ask it to do that. It's your choice. It's a service a developer may elect to provide you, for your own damn convenience.

    Are you really that naïve?

    Any site will promise you "important updates" and then spam you. Then you can go to a support forum and hope somebody will tell you how to disable that crap.

    If I want to be updated by a site, there's RSS. No need to reinvent that.

    Pretty sure you will use it for apple insider so you can concern troll new posts first.

    Also pretty sure you will be able to revoke these in notification center. You can bet if someone abuses it, apple is going to shut them off as they run the service. They also know to expect people to try and work to prevent it.
  • Reply 18 of 52
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

     

     

    Since there is as of yet no information about how it will be implemented or if it's possible to send notifications without the users consent, just saying (essentially) "trust Apple!" is not that helpful.  


     

    There's quite a lot of information about how it's implemented in the documentation the notification of the feature links to.

     

    It is not possible to send notifications without the user's explicit consent, they can revoke that consent at any time and they will stop getting them, you also get told if a user has opted-out and are required to stop sending them. The notifications are subject to the same push notification guidelines as other notifications, you need to register with Apple and receive a certificate in order to send them at all and that certificate will be revoked if you violate any of the terms. 

     

    So you can't spam everyone, if they didn't opt-in, or opted out, they aren't going to see the notifications and also Apple, who's servers they go through, will very rapidly see that you're sending notifications to people who asked not to receive them and there goes your certificate. 

     

    This just builds on the Local Notifications which were in 10.8, don't remember anyone complaining they were a spamfest. 

     

    Not sure I see a lot of websites using this, and those that do will have to be very judicious about what they send in order to stop people just opting out as soon as they are blitzed. Those websites which use it sensibly and responsibly will hopefully give some benefit to the people who sign up. 

  • Reply 19 of 52
    Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

    another useless feature for the 3 people who still use it, safari is such a fail on desktop that it is now in the "other" section in market share. Apple just needs to let this die.

     

    Please be quiet now. Why you haven't done something about the sickness that compels you to post here is beyond me.

     

    It's understandable that people are either too stupid or uninformed to use what is best. The best vehicles, for example, comprise a small percentage of vehicles. The best of many product categories is the smallest percentage.

  • Reply 20 of 52
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post





    Pretty sure you will use it for apple insider so you can concern troll new posts first.



    Also pretty sure you will be able to revoke these in notification center. You can bet if someone abuses it, apple is going to shut them off as they run the service. They also know to expect people to try and work to prevent it.

     

    No idea what the first sentence is supposed to mean.

     

    It is not about what I can "revoke", or what Apple does to control it (I prefer to be in control of my computer myself, even if this means that I screw up something). It is about wether it serves a purpose.

     

    I can subscribe to a site using RSS (Apple chose to leave that to third parties, which is fine), and if I really want to follow something, they can provide an app with or without notifications. I do use e.g. Apple Insider's app and did allow it to send notifications.

     

    I do use the browser (Safari in this case) to go to random sites and expect this to be a painless experience. I do not want to be prompted for notification approvals. And I especially do not want my mother to be prompted for this crap. Every time a dialogue she did not expect comes up on her screen, she calls me. Why 10.9 should increase these calls by several 100 percent, for nothing, is simply beyond me. There is nothing this does make better.

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