FileMaker 13 launches with browser-based support via HTML5, new tools for iPhone & iPad

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
FileMaker, Inc., on Tuesday launched the next major update to its database software, with the new FileMaker 13 packing in more than 50 new features, including WebDirect, an entirely new browser-based technology for easier access.

FileMaker


FileMaker 13 is promised to make it faster and easier than ever for teams to create tailored business solutions across platforms, including iPad, iPhone, Windows, Mac, and now the Web. Available immediately, FileMaker 13 is priced at $329, while updates are available for $179. Monthly prices start at $9 for FileMaker Pro, $15 for FileMaker Pro Advanced, and $29 for FileMaker Server.

"With FileMaker 13, any team can quickly create custom solutions that streamline their business processes while minimizing design time," said Ryan Rosenberg, vice president of marketing and services for FileMaker, Inc. "The FileMaker 13 Platform gives organizations even more options for delivering powerful but easy-to-use solutions, including breakthrough web technology, along with impressive new design tools for iOS and desktops."

FileMaker


Features of the new software, according to FileMaker, include:
  • FileMaker WebDirect, an entirely new, HTML5 browser-based technology that allows teams to create and deploy desktop-style solutions in a web browser with no programming skills required.
  • Tools to create amazing iPad and iPhone solutions that support even more iOS behaviors, including slide controls, popovers and the ability to scan records using gestures. iPad and iPhone layouts can now be created in one step; and iOS solutions can include single-click capture of bar codes using on-device cameras and custom keyboards that speed data entry.
  • Major improvements to design capabilities, including support for shareable custom themes and styles, and the ability to drag and drop data fields onto design layouts.
  • More robust security, with AES 256-bit encryption that locks down data no matter where it lives - on iPad, iPhone, desktop or server. FileMaker Pro 13 Advanced is used to enable encryption.
  • Dozens of new enhancements for solution developers, from the ability to hide or display objects on a screen based on business logic to easier integration with web applications.
  • Simplified server administration, including an entirely new HTML5 administrative console in FileMaker Server 13 for managing business solutions from anywhere.
FileMaker


The official FileMaker Go app for iPhone and iPad is available for free on the iOS App Store. Server concurrent connections for FileMaker Go or FileMaker WebDirect cost $25 per 5-pack, per month, and are available from FileMaker and software resellers.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 46

    Wish Apple would just fold them into themselves.

  • Reply 2 of 46
    But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!
  • Reply 3 of 46
    adamcadamc Posts: 547member
    But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!

    It is not the latest iteration not able to open the last version but the last version to open the latest version files.

    Why not ask Adobe why their last version can't open the latest version file.

    One of the latest version features is using the camera in the iOS devices for scanning and this makes google glass usage in the enterprise DOA.
  • Reply 4 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AdamC View Post





    It is not the latest iteration not able to open the last version but the last version to open the latest version files.



    Why not ask Adobe why their last version can't open the latest version file.



    One of the latest version features is using the camera in the iOS devices for scanning and this makes google glass usage in the enterprise DOA.

     

    I'm staying away from the latest Adobe software like the plague.

  • Reply 5 of 46
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,770member

    Interesting. Hopefully the new browser feature means that someone will use Filemaker to create a great CRM product.

     

    Of course, Filemaker is probably still hobbled by its inability to play nice with OS X's Contacts and Calendar.

  • Reply 6 of 46

    FileMaker Pro 6 was released in 2002, which means almost 12 years ago.

     

    You CAN open a FileMaker 6 database in FileMaker 12, but you have to first convert to FileMaker Pro 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11. This takes no time at all; simply open the database in the newer version and FileMaker converts it for you.



    From here you can convert your database to FileMaker 12 (or now 13); version 12 added massive new features that include lots of CSS styling, which necessitated a new file structure.

     

    If you're still using FileMaker 6, are you also still using Windows XP, or God forbid, Windows Milennium? If you're on a Mac, are you still running Mac OS X 10.1, which was released in 2002? I doubt it.

     

     

    FileMaker has gone to great pains to make sure that users of antiquated versions aren't orphaned... and yes, FM 6 is an antique.

  • Reply 7 of 46
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by longterm View Post

     

    FileMaker Pro 6 was released in 2002, which means almost 12 years ago.

     

    You CAN open a FileMaker 6 database in FileMaker 12, but you have to first convert to FileMaker Pro 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11. This takes no time at all; simply open the database in the newer version and FileMaker converts it for you.



    From here you can convert your database to FileMaker 12 (or now 13); version 12 added massive new features that include lots of CSS styling, which necessitated a new file structure.

     

    If you're still using FileMaker 6, are you also still using Windows XP, or God forbid, Windows Milennium? If you're on a Mac, are you still running Mac OS X 10.1, which was released in 2002? I doubt it.

     

     

    FileMaker has gone to great pains to make sure that users of antiquated versions aren't orphaned... and yes, FM 6 is an antique.


     

    And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".

  • Reply 8 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!

    As opposed to Microsoft who breaks EVERY version of Access with each new release?

     

    FM Pro can open FM7 files. FM6 hasn't been supported in god nows when and you're complaining about an ancient file format that no one uses anymore?

  • Reply 9 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

     

    And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".


    You say "FM7 ruins FM6 databases;" that's totally not true. Explain how it "ruins" older databases.

     

    I'm a certified developer in the last 4 versions, started using FileMaker in version 2. I can say with authority that it doesn't "ruin" older versions.

     

    Some older commands were changed to fit with current structure, but there is NOTHING about converting that "ruins" an older database. I suspect that your database is poorly-written and you are afraid that conversion will force you to clean up some of the mess, but that's not FileMaker's problem, that's the problem with using a poorly-written solution.

     

    There are about a thousand reasons why you should've moved into a newer version of FileMaker; here are a few off the top of my head:

     

    It's tons faster--FM 12 is super-fast;

    Over a hundred new functions were added since FileMaker 6, functions that make it easier to write great solutions that do more, faster;

    Script triggers--scripts can be triggered when a field is entered, exited, a layout is entered, exited, and tons more; this one feature alone is worth upgrading;

    CSS-based layouts--they simply look fantastic, and it's really easy to create new layouts that look professional, even when done by a novice;

    FM 13 brings even more--great new interface tools like popovers and other tools;

    Server tools make it easy to do incremental backups all day long (my biggest client, who has a bunch of 12GB files, backs up every 3 minutes);

    and on and on and on...

     

    Tell me what problems you think conversion introduces and I bet I can solve it in about 30 seconds.

  • Reply 10 of 46
    people did some crazy things in FileMaker 6 to implement script parameters, updating value lists and a whole swag of other stuff that used to be "difficult"
    the database is not ruined, it may need some of those hacks brought into the 21st century. the performance, the data viewer and the debugger make this a cinch if you have half a brain
  • Reply 11 of 46

    core2crm? zulu? lmgtfu!

  • Reply 12 of 46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JBFromOZ View Post



    people did some crazy things in FileMaker 6 to implement script parameters, updating value lists and a whole swag of other stuff that used to be "difficult"

    the database is not ruined, it may need some of those hacks brought into the 21st century. the performance, the data viewer and the debugger make this a cinch if you have half a brain

    Well said; I see databases all the time that were badly-designed and hacked together, and clients don't want to lose their valuable work... </sarcasm>

     

    A poor craftsman blames his tools.

     

    Even if some dodgy methods were used for things like script parameters, a lot of them can probably be made to still work once converting; it wouldn't take long for an experienced FileMaker developer to find and fix any of these issues. It sounds, from what I read in this guy's posts, that he just doesn't want to spend the time.

     

    To that I would respond: how much is your business worth? Do you want to stay in 12-year-old technology forever? Sure, Windows XP *works* but why would you want to use it? For that matter, old flip phones work just fine, but who wants to look at a screen that shows a maximum of about 30 characters? 

     

    To which he might respond: yeah, but it WORKS.

     

    Sure. So does a car that runs on 5 of its 6 cylinders. 



    The security benefits in newer versions of FileMaker are enormous; encryption is now built into FileMaker 13. The server uses encryption to communicate with clients across the LAN (has done so for quite a while now); you can have multiple windows. You can have multiple tables in a single database file; I have solutions with over 100 tables in a single file, which makes scripting easier, relationships much easier to deal with...

     

    Or he can use 2002 technology. Let's see, in 2002 we had:

     

    OS X 10.1

    Flip phones

    Palm Pilots

    Cable modems were the only thing resembling broadband, and they were slooooooow...

  • Reply 13 of 46
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,387member
    frank777 wrote: »
    Of course, Filemaker is probably still hobbled by its inability to play nice with OS X's Contacts and Calendar.

    I can't find it on their website if they did. But they still have 30 day trials, so check it out.

    One thing they still didn't get right:

    1000

    It's 2013 for crying out loud; I shouldn't have to deal with hooking up to iTunes, copy pasting stuff in order for it to be on my iPhone. This is Microsoft-stupidity. I want my data synched across all devices, OTA, with iCloud. In the spirit of Jeremy Clarkson: "How hard can it be?"

    Bento synced, but you needed to be connected to the same WiFi network and have the app open on both devices.

    edit: typo. And this:

    "Upload solutions created with FileMaker Pro to FileMaker Server or email to your iPad and iPhone for use in FileMaker Go." That is so 1995
  • Reply 14 of 46
    zabazaba Posts: 226member
    It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.
  • Reply 15 of 46
    Definitely come a long way from FM4 and using CDML to get stuff online. My first database-driven site for work used that back in 1998. Those were the days :)
  • Reply 16 of 46
    It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.

    they have a developer app and a client / runtime app generator: http://www.filemaker.com/help/html/fmpa_tools.24.12.html

    it's been around since before the MacPlus. You don't have a clue what you're talking about.

    the company that originally developed it also developed the app that became PowerPoint (OK nobody's perfect)

    "Don't criticize what you cannot understand"... Robert Zimmerman
  • Reply 17 of 46
    As a long- time user of FileMaker Pro and Bento, when the company left my extensive Bento database workflows high an dry by canceling Bento, why would I ever trust this company again? A database is not like an RTF file. I can obviously not count on future support from this company.
  • Reply 18 of 46
    emrulemrul Posts: 26member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

     

    And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".


     

    Very typical 'clueless user' mentality. No clue what's actually going on so just stay in the ice age, blame newer versions of the product and resist change because its inconvenient.  Stick with your antique, a few years from now you'll have no way to upgrade and you'll probably resort to hiring some cheap labour to create a new solution that'll probably have just as many forward compatibility traps.
  • Reply 19 of 46
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,289member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by longterm View Post

     

     I suspect that your database is poorly-written and you are afraid that conversion will force you to clean up some of the mess, but that's not FileMaker's problem, that's the problem with using a poorly-written solution.


     

    I work for a technology company that implements enterprise solutions and we frequently have to integrate FileMaker databases.   The biggest problem we see is that so many of these FileMaker databases were written by  amateurs who had no idea how to design a database and they're a total mess (not technically, but intellectually).    FileMaker is easy to use, but it doesn't force one to use standard database design principles.     I usually refer to these databases as "ransom notes".     They're frequently so poorly designed and the cost to convert them is so high that we wind up recommending that the client re-key the data into our database.  

  • Reply 20 of 46
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,289member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zaba View Post



    It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.

    While  I agree that they should have a developer app and client app with different pricing, the cost is a "rounding error" compared to what enterprise solutions like Oracle charge.     

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