Rumor: LG hopes to catch up to Apple with fingerprint sensor in next-gen Android phone

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
LG Electronics is reportedly testing a prototype version of the next generation of its flagship G-series smartphones that will allegedly include a swipe-based fingerprint sensor, countering the Touch ID capability of Apple's iPhone 5s.

Touch ID


The so-called "G3" from LG is said to currently be in testing, according to a report published this week by The Korea Herald. The next-generation Android handset is reportedly expected to debut at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, scheduled for February of 2014.

However, unlike Apple's Touch ID fingerprint sensor embedded in the iPhone 5s home button, which allows a user to simply place their finger on the scanner, LG's method "would likely come as a swipe fingerprint sensor," the report said. That would suggest that LG has been unable to replicate the patented, unique fingerprint scanning technology Apple acquired in its purchase of security firm AuthenTec.

The Times report also cited an unnamed source who indicated that Apple plans to bring Touch ID to a "broader range of its products, including smartphones and tablet PCs." Touch ID debuted on the iPhone 5s in September, but was not added to Apple's late 2013 iPad lineup, leaving the feature exclusive to the company's flagship smartphone for the time being.

Touch ID


LG's rumored "G3" smartphone is also reportedly expected to include Google's Android 4.4 Kitkat operating system, as well as a "Quad HD" display and a 2.2-gigahertz octa-core processor. The report also said that LG is developing a wearable smart watch and health and fitness wrist band that will sync to the "G3," and those devices are also rumored to debut at the Mobile World Congress event.

LG is not to be confused with LG Display, an independent company that is also a key supplier for Apple, providing high-resolution panels for the iPhone and iPad. In October, one rumor claimed that LG Display will provide OLED screens for Apple's rumored wrist-worn "iWatch" accessory.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 113

    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

  • Reply 2 of 113

    It won't be as good. All these "rushed" to market copies of Apple's tech are inferior. Mainly b/c they are "rushed!"

     

    Best

  • Reply 3 of 113
    [I]There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
    [/I]
  • Reply 4 of 113
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
    Have you re-scanned your fingers? imore.com had a piece up a while back with some tips on what you can do if touch ID isn't always working properly.
  • Reply 5 of 113
    Mine works great! I love the feature%u2026 easy Apple/iTunes store paying too. I now get so annoyed having to type in anything for security. Just saying.
  • Reply 6 of 113
    Yeah my sensor works like 99% of the time... I'm anxious to see these other guys mess things up
  • Reply 7 of 113
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    philboogie wrote: »
    There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
    So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. :rolleyes:
  • Reply 8 of 113
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,147member
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

    If my wife can do it anyone can. :D. She has not had any problems whatsoever. My guess is your initial set up wasn't done quite right.
  • Reply 9 of 113
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,147member
    rogifan wrote: »
    So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. :rolleyes:

    Lead and they. Shall follow.

    I'm surprises Scamsung didn't say they make a 128-bit chip :no:
  • Reply 10 of 113
    wovelwovel Posts: 956member
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

    Mine works abou 99% of the time. The only issue I had was one I messed up the tips on the 3 fingers I had scanned in. I rescanned one as a 4th print and it worked fine until they healed up. Now they all 3 work great again. It is actually one of those things I still think is pretty impressive after a few months of use.
  • Reply 11 of 113
    rogifan wrote: »
    philboogie wrote: »
    There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
    So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. :rolleyes:

    Sad, isn't it. All this putting down of Apple inventions, or new uses of earlier implementations of some technology, but when the competition also implements an earlier tech, or shamelessly copy the idea/design/tech from Apple it is somehow considered 'obvious'. Take a peek down history lane:

    Apple moves laptop keyboard to the back, near the screen, creating an armrest while typing. All laptops therefrom adopt the same design and trolls tell us this is only logical evolution,
    Apple integrates the battery in their iPods. Competitors music players start to do the same. Same thing happened after Apple's new laptop design, same thing with the iPhone. And now tablets,
    "A virtual keyboard on a touchscreen? No way that'll work!" But when they see their market share drop and think "well, we might need to do this as well as Apple is taking away all our customers who used to be so loyal to us".
    Next thing we'll see is them removing the ODD, soldered RAM/GPU and trolls will...

    Ah, what's the use. They will simply never get it. Apple does. Perhaps all Wall St. blue-suit-red-tie wannabes are also trolls working for Apple competitors to write such nonsense. I think Jess3 illustrated it best in The Zen of Steve Jobs:

    700
  • Reply 12 of 113
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

    Almost never fails for me.
    Try retraining.
  • Reply 13 of 113
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,509member
    Let them catch! It took them years to catch the screen detection of the touchscreen (when not hindered by bad software that makes it slow anyway). I don't think they'll catch with touchID soon. I'm still amazed at how fast it is. I keep on forgetting it is there.
  • Reply 14 of 113
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,288member
    A lot of ideas are said to be simple gimmicks. . .
    until the ones saying so decide to use the idea themselves. Larger-display smartphones are "gimmicks" too. Once upon a time smaller iPads would have been considered "gimmicky". If something is desired by the marketplace there will be plenty of companies vying to fill it whether it's a gimmick or not.
  • Reply 15 of 113
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

    Mine works really well for the most part, although sometimes the sensor just won't activate it seems. It pulls up the dial pad, and won't attempt to read my thumb print. I can punch in the code and then try it again, and it works fine (and this isn't just after a reboot - I know you have to punch in the code after that). Any new tech is going to have its growing pains. Mine works most of the time, so the times that it doesn't aren't annoying.
  • Reply 16 of 113
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,509member
    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
    I'm not blaming you, some people are having issues. Might be due to the shape of your prints or the way your skin changes during the day, or something else. I have no problem myself. I have scanned 4 fingers, and haven't changed the prints for more than a month. It works almost all the time, I'd say more than 90% and close to 95% of the time. And if it doesn't work on the first try, it always does on the second.
  • Reply 17 of 113
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    I wish them luck but there are several parts to this that I don't think are easily tackled. Are they going to create their own SoC or at least create their own secure chip to store the encrypted hashes? Will they use sapphire crystal? Are they acquiring any companies to make this happen? And where is Samsung in all of this? I would have thought they would be first out of the gate with SSecure or something.

    PS: I wonder if TouchID requires the increased security features of AArch64.

    How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

    I haven't had any issues. I wonder if people are scanning in their prints in the manner that is shown on the graphic. Meaning, vertical and straight down in an unnatural position. I did mine on an angle in the position I would most likely try to do a scan when holding it with one hand.
  • Reply 18 of 113
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    Adding touch id to Android is like improving the lock on your door when all the windows are open. A waste of time, in other words.

  • Reply 19 of 113
    "Where is Samsung in all of this?"

    The rumor chatter is Samsung is developing a retina scanner to top Touch ID.
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