Apple's 19.5 percent share of global PC & tablet sales now larger than Dell & HP combined

Posted:
in iPad edited February 2014
Market research firm Canalys reports that Apple achieved a 19.5 percent slice of global, combined PC and tablet sales in the fourth calendar quarter of 2013. That's a larger share of unit sales than Dell and HP together, and well in advance of second place Lenovo and third place Samsung.

Canalys counts tablets

Canalys is unique among market research groups (including Gartner, IDC and Strategy Analytics) in that it recognizes tablet shipments as being a key segment of the PC industry.

The firm notes that tablets now account for nearly 50 percent of PC unit sales.

Other research firms used to include tablets in their PC market share reports during the two decades where most tablets were boosting the numbers attributed to Microsoft's Windows. When Apple began selling tablets, Gartner and IDC began to exclude the iPad, counting it separately instead as a non-PC "media tablet."

That gerrymandering of the PC market didn't stop Apple's iPad from having a profound impact on the PC market, it just distracted attention away from the clear and obvious trend among consumers and the enterprise in favor of iPads at the expense of conventional PC form factors.

Apple's iPad share increasing despite cheap tablet alternatives

Canalys reported that, including tablets, the global PC market grew 17.9 percent, with tablets accounting for all of that growth. Year over year, tablet sales grew 64.2 percent to reach 76.3 million units.

Tablets accounted for 48.3 percent of all PC sales, while non-tablet PCs alone declined by 6.9 percent over the previous year, "with falls in all regions" the company stated.

Apple's iPad accounted for 26 million tablet sales, or more than a third of all tablets sold. That share increased from the 27.3 percent slice of tablets Canalys reported in the year ago quarter. Including Macs, Apple sold a total of 30.9 million computers.

Canalys also noted that Apple has an even greater 38.3 percent share of tablet sales in China, where cheap alternative devices are readily available.

"But competition is mounting and Android tablets are falling in price, which will put pressure on Apple's market share in 2014," Canalys warned.

Apple's iPhone, Mac share also increasing despite cheaper alternatives

At the same time, Apple's share of conventional PC notebooks has been increasing in unit share despite the supply of much cheaper tablets offered by every other PC maker.

Apple's iPhone market share is also increasing despite the fact that Average Selling Prices of competitors' smartphones are far lower.

According to data from IDC, the ASP of all non-iPhone devices it categorizes as a "smartphone" is now around $270. Apple's iPhone ASP is more than twice that, around $635.


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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,821member
    But Apple is doomed! Remember? Steve isn't here and Tim sucks so Apple is automatically doomed no matter what.
  • Reply 2 of 23
    That is why Apple has no growth As Apple already earned the best the most .
    No growth is a big problem for Apple .
  • Reply 3 of 23
    b9botb9bot Posts: 238member

    These great figures keep coming out and yet Anal-ists are stuck in this doom and gloom outlook. Except when Google posts a LOSS, then there shares rise $46 in one day.

    This is non-sense!

  • Reply 4 of 23
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,788member
    And all this during a continuing world-wide recession.
    Just imagine what Apple will do if/when the economy really heats up again.
  • Reply 5 of 23
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by b9bot View Post

     

    These great figures keep coming out and yet Anal-ists are stuck in this doom and gloom outlook. Except when Google posts a LOSS, then there shares rise $46 in one day.

    This is non-sense!


     

    Google posted a loss?

  • Reply 6 of 23
    sockrolid wrote: »
    And all this during a continuing world-wide recession.
    Just imagine what Apple will do if/when the economy really heats up again.

    I don't want a political debate or anything, but the recession in it's literal term ended like 4 years ago.
  • Reply 7 of 23
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,161member
    Plus a huge number of those 'PCs' cost less than an iPhone or an iPad, let alone looking the the relative profit difference.
  • Reply 8 of 23
    512ke512ke Posts: 782member

    Technology is evolving more quickly that the categories in peoples' minds.  What is a PC these days?  What if it's your watch, but also your Apple TV, a cloud server, and the processor in your toaster?  What if Apple seamlessly integrates all those devices with data spanning them?

     

    I would argue that not only is an iPad a PC, an iPhone is also a PC.

     

    The hands free in my car is becoming a PC.

     

    The watch is becoming a PC.

     

    Each of those devices is gaining far more than the capabilities that any box running a desktop OS ever had.

     

    So.... why are will still categorizing these things based on their physical shapes?  Who cares if it's shaped into a desktop box, an oval, a watch, a car handsfree, a pocket gizmo, or an etherial cloud?  

     

    The categorizations should evolve more quickly along with the technology that's causing everything to blur.

  • Reply 9 of 23
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by b9bot View Post

     

    These great figures keep coming out and yet Anal-ists are stuck in this doom and gloom outlook. Except when Google posts a LOSS, then there shares rise $46 in one day.

    This is non-sense!


     

    When did Google post a loss? Sorry, a LOSS?

  • Reply 10 of 23
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post



    And all this during a continuing world-wide recession.

    Just imagine what Apple will do if/when the economy really heats up again.

     

    What does market share have to do with a recession?

  • Reply 11 of 23
    mknoppmknopp Posts: 257member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 512ke View Post

     

    Technology is evolving more quickly that the categories in peoples' minds.  What is a PC these days?  What if it's your watch, but also your Apple TV, a cloud server, and the processor in your toaster?  What if Apple seamlessly integrates all those devices with data spanning them?

     

    I would argue that not only is an iPad a PC, an iPhone is also a PC.

     

    The hands free in my car is becoming a PC.

     

    The watch is becoming a PC.

     

    Each of those devices is gaining far more than the capabilities that any box running a desktop OS ever had.

     

    So.... why are will still categorizing these things based on their physical shapes?  Who cares if it's shaped into a desktop box, an oval, a watch, a car handsfree, a pocket gizmo, or an etherial cloud?  

     

    The categorizations should evolve more quickly along with the technology that's causing everything to blur.


     

    The answer to that is easy. They become a PC or a smartphone or a tablet or an Android device when the companies reporting them decide that labeling them as such hurts Apple's numbers in the report. Keep in mind that most if not all of these companies compiling numbers are being paid by people to provide them with data that helps them. Thus, if Apple isn't the customer then it is their job to make sure that Apple looks bad compared to the people paying their wage.

     

    The PC market is like the horse buggy market around the time the automobile came out.

  • Reply 12 of 23

    What happened to market share of that "other" class? You know, the so-called white-box vendors? Weren't they something like 60%?

  • Reply 13 of 23
    Originally Posted by justp1ayin View Post

    I don't want a political debate or anything, but the recession in it's literal term ended like 4 years ago.

     

    Explains why we still have 35% unemployment, then.

     

    Originally Posted by marubeni View Post

    What does market share have to do with a recession?


     

    What does Apple marketshare increasing have to do with people having less disposable income across the board? Really?

  • Reply 14 of 23
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    Explains why we still have 35% unemployment, then.

    You're all for people losing their jobs, remember?
  • Reply 15 of 23
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

    You're all for people losing their jobs, remember?

     

    You've already reported this item. Thanks for helping to make our community better.

  • Reply 16 of 23
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    You've already reported this item. Thanks for helping to make our community better.

    Good luck with that.
  • Reply 17 of 23
    Explains why we still have 35% unemployment, then

    Yes yes the hidden numbers, the ones someone reported because an analyst said so and we all know they are always right... If I line up 10 random friends, do only 6 have jobs...?

    Anyways unemployment rate and recession are not the same thing. Recession is contracted spending like we saw in 2008, but people are spending now more than ever so like i said, by the literal meaning, the recession has been over
  • Reply 18 of 23
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,979member
    justp1ayin wrote: »
    Yes yes the hidden numbers, the ones someone reported because an analyst said so and we all know they are always right... If I line up 10 random friends, do only 6 have jobs...?

    Anyways unemployment rate and recession are not the same thing. Recession is contracted spending like we saw in 2008, but people are spending now more than ever so like i said, by the literal meaning, the recession has been over

    They're spending more because everything costs more.
  • Reply 19 of 23
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    They're spending more because everything costs more.

    Exactly. It's all related. That's inflation. Now during a recession you might even see deflation (falling prices) which is bad for the economy.

    Although you are wrong as to the amount and the level of inflation. I worked retail during 2008-2010 so yeah we saw losses of 25% during 2008 but before I left in 2010, we were at sales we had never seen before... And nothing really got more expensive.
  • Reply 20 of 23
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,799member
    My toothbrush has a faster CPU than many cheap tablets; I'm not sure that's a reliable metric.
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