Apple adds support for new, previously-unknown iPad models in iOS 7.1

Posted:
in iPad edited March 2014
Monday's iOS 7.1 update brought a slew of documented changes and two surprise additions -- update bundles customized for iPad models that are not known to have been publicly released.

iPad Air


In addition to updates for the company's latest iPhones and iPads, Apple's download server plays host to iOS 7.1 bundles targeted at iPads with model identifiers iPad4,3 and iPad4,6. As first noted by iClarified, those identifiers have not been seen before in the wild.

The Wi-Fi model of the iPad mini with Retina display is known as iPad4,4, while its cellular data-equipped counterpart bears the designation iPad4,5. iPad Air models are identified as iPad4,1 for Wi-Fi only and iPad4,2 when a cellular radio is added.

The intermediate nature of the iPad4,3 moniker suggests that these new models could simply be evolutionary hardware updates rather than totally new devices. They may be reserved, for instance, for tablets destined for China Mobile's unique TD-LTE network which have not yet received certification.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    irelandireland Posts: 17,571member
    Still several obvious bugs in 7.1

    [QUOTE]The intermediate nature of the iPad4,3 moniker suggests that these new models could simply be evolutionary hardware updates rather than totally new devices. They may be reserved, for instance, for tablets destined for China Mobile's unique TD-LTE network which have not yet received certification.[/QUOTE]

    And.... solved.
  • Reply 2 of 34
    darklitedarklite Posts: 229member

    Interesting. I saw the title and was hoping these were signs of the hypothetical 'iPad Pro', but it does look like they're just minor updates :(

  • Reply 3 of 34
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,375member
    According to Everymac.com, the model numbers above are incorrect. The correct model numbers are:

    iPad4,1 (iPad Air, WiFi only)
    iPad4,2 (iPad Air, WiFi + cellular)
    iPad4,3 - no listing
    iPad4,4 (iPad mini Retina, WiFi only)
    iPad4,5 (iPad mini Retina, WiFi + cellular)
    iPad4,6 - no listing

    Source: http://www.everymac.com/ultimate-mac-lookup/?search_keywords=iPad4,5

    (Update: correction applied to original post.)
  • Reply 4 of 34
    smalmsmalm Posts: 656member

    Satellite communication! :D

  • Reply 5 of 34
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,283member
    Presumably it's LTE or worldwide LTE. Or some such.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    focherfocher Posts: 640member
    The iPad TV and the iPad Watch
  • Reply 7 of 34
    dcj001dcj001 Posts: 301member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    Apple adds support for new, previously-unknown iPad models in iOS 7.1


     

    Yes! I can finally update to iOS 7.1 on my 12.9" iPad Pro 4,6 prototype.

     

    I can't wait to tell Tim about my experience with this device.

  • Reply 8 of 34
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,718member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Monday's iOS 7.1 update brought a slew of documented changes and two surprise additions -- update bundles customized for iPad models that are not known to have been publicly released.



    The intermediate nature of the iPad4,3 moniker suggests that these new models could simply be evolutionary hardware updates rather than totally new devices. They may be reserved, for instance, for tablets destined for China Mobile's unique TD-LTE network which have not yet received certification.

     

    Still waiting for TouchID enabled iPads, with profiles.  :)

  • Reply 9 of 34
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by DCJ001 View Post

    12.9 iPad


    Every time I think of this glorious future.gif

  • Reply 10 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    The intermediate nature of the iPad4,3 moniker suggests that these new models could simply be evolutionary hardware updates rather than totally new devices. They may be reserved, for instance, for tablets destined for China Mobile's unique TD-LTE network which have not yet received certification.

    It could also be a completely silent, CPU change like they did with the iPad 2 with WiFI. It was originally was model 2,1 at 45nm but when they were testing the 32nm HK+MG process they updated it to 2,4 during the iPad (3)'s reign. I could see them do this again to test an LP smaller than 28nm.
  • Reply 11 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    john.b wrote: »
    Still waiting for TouchID enabled iPads, with profiles.  :)

    I wonder if profiles are even remotely feasible with today's technology.
  • Reply 12 of 34
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I wonder if profiles are even remotely feasible with today's technology.

    What do you mean?
  • Reply 13 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    clemynx wrote: »
    What do you mean?

    I don't think the performance of the HW is good enough to allow for different user accounts to be placed on a single iDevice. With a Mac or PC you log in and your account is loaded but you tend to use that device for an extended period. With an iPad I'd think the benefit would be from being able to pick it up, used TouchID (or a PIN) to unlock it and have it be ready to use. If you had to wait 1-2 minutes for the other user's account to close down and yours to open up that wouldn't be feasible.

    One solution is to simply load all accounts at start up but I don't think the HW can allow for having multiple accounts loaded at once and running in the background due to RAM and CPU requirements, but also because of what it would do to the battery life.

    Furthermore, if you have multiple user accounts you then can't simply use a PIN for each user but also then require a unique username because a PIN could be duplicated. This would still be required even if you had TouchID because there are times when you still need to input your PIN.

    For these reasons I think multiple user accounts aren't feasible.


    PS: I'm wondering now if [@]John.B[/@] meant profiles, like how BB10 offers personal and work profiles. If so, then my apologizes.
  • Reply 14 of 34

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  • Reply 15 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    I don't think the performance of the HW is good enough to allow for different user accounts to be placed on a single iDevice. With a Mac or PC you log in and your account is loaded but you tend to use that device for an extended period. With an iPad I'd think the benefit would be from being able to pick it up, used TouchID (or a PIN) to unlock it and have it be ready to use. If you had to wait 1-2 minutes for the other user's account to close down and yours to open up that wouldn't be feasible.



    One solution is to simply load all accounts at start up but I don't think the HW can allow for having multiple accounts loaded at once and running in the background due to RAM and CPU requirements, but also because of what it would do to the battery life.



    Furthermore, if you have multiple user accounts you then can't simply use a PIN for each user but also then require a unique username because a PIN could be duplicated. This would still be required even if you had TouchID because there are times when you still need to input your PIN.



    For these reasons I think multiple user accounts aren't feasible.





    PS: I'm wondering now if @John.B meant profiles, like how BB10 offers personal and work profiles. If so, then my apologizes.

     

    Piling on in agreement.

     

    If the former, I think the key aspect is the base security architecture.  Right now, there appear to be a lot of linkages about one AppleID per Device, while nothing I've read about the TouchID, and the Secure Enclave says it can't, I'm having a hard time seeing 2 or more distinct individuals (appleIDs) sharing the same device in the TouchID enabled case.  And, in (maybe my imagined) theory, I would assume everything would have to be duplicated locally (minimally, all the data spaces for each app... no locally shared music, videos, for example... possibly even each app would have to be duplicated, assuming different AppleIDs are in play).  To your point, the Security enclave itself would have multiple separate storages for PINs and fingerprint hashes, and they would have to search both to find which is which... and some security things would have to be common settings (number of failures to remote wipe.... who's phone is it really in FindMyiPhone), which then requires an 'admin' level user... The problem doesn't scale in the 'end to end' security model.

     

    The path appears that the Apple model is one person per device (and multiple devices per person).  Data in the cloud can be shared, but no local data.  And I do think the Security enclave will be base hardware on all 2015 released devices.

     

     

    If the latter, even that may be less than doable, given a general purpose (non BES only) requirement of being managed by any of the commercial MDMs on the 'work' side, primarily from the Device/User Security union, in particular apps like Safari, Mail, Phone... If I can't separate browsing my corporate HR database in one Safari window, from other browser windows, where a simple (or poorly placed) paste could expose $Ms of breachable records.

  • Reply 16 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Piling on in agreement.

    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">If the former, I think the key aspect is the base security architecture.  Right now, there appear to be a lot of linkages about one AppleID per Device, while nothing I've read about the TouchID, and the Secure Enclave says it can't, I'm having a hard time seeing 2 or more distinct individuals (appleIDs) sharing the same device in the TouchID enabled case.  And, in (maybe my imagined) theory, I would assume everything would have to be duplicated locally (minimally, all the data spaces for each app... no locally shared music, videos, for example... possibly even each app would have to be duplicated, assuming different AppleIDs are in play).  To your point, the Security enclave itself would have multiple separate storages for PINs and fingerprint hashes, and they would have to search both to find which is which... and some security things would have to be common settings (number of failures to remote wipe.... who's phone is it really in FindMyiPhone), which then requires an 'admin' level user... The problem doesn't scale in the 'end to end' security model.</span>


    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">The path appears that the Apple model is one person per device (and multiple devices per person).  </span>
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Data in the cloud can be shared, but no local data.  And I do think the Security enclave will be base hardware on all 2015 released devices.</span>



    If the latter, even that may be less than doable, given a general purpose (non BES only) requirement of being managed by any of the commercial MDMs on the 'work' side, primarily from the Device/User Security union, in particular apps like Safari, Mail, Phone... If I can't separate browsing my corporate HR database in one Safari window, from other browser windows, where a simple (or poorly placed) paste could expose $Ms of breachable records.

    I wasn't going to go down that rabbit hole but since we're there… you're correct.

    I think Apple could use it's Mac OS experience to make an application repository that looks like each installed app is not each Home Screen if the user wants it. This would mean that a user could go to the App Store and download, say, Threes!* at 36MiB but it would appear instantly if another user on the device already had it installed.

    I think. like on the Mac, they could use a segregated PLIST files and storage, but that would take a change to the app setup as it currently stands. I think all the Mac App Store apps that use iCloud for storage don't have an issue with this. The problem I see is getting all developers to update their apps or for Apple to create an intermediary layer where the app is stored in a clean state and then your data is "side loaded" each time by the system and then removed and saved again before it quits. Both of these seem like a problem to me.

    I think the secure enclave could be grown substanitally to accommodate more prints without affecting TouchID performance so I'd say this would be the easiest of the options**. I also think Find My iPhone could simply work with multiple accounts on a single device but I wonder if multiple accounts for a single phone number is reasonable.

    Bottom line, it's a nice wish but I'd be surprised if ever actually happens without a lot of changes across the board.



    * Threes! is my number one game for going number two.
    ** Is TouchID's 1 in 50,000 reference to each finger so having 5 fingers is 1 in in 10,000, like a 4-digit PIN? If so, then having 5 user accounts with 5 fingers each puts TouchID at 1 in 2,000 chance of a random finger working.
  • Reply 17 of 34

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  • Reply 18 of 34
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I don't think the performance of the HW is good enough to allow for different user accounts to be placed on a single iDevice. With a Mac or PC you log in and your account is loaded but you tend to use that device for an extended period. With an iPad I'd think the benefit would be from being able to pick it up, used TouchID (or a PIN) to unlock it and have it be ready to use. If you had to wait 1-2 minutes for the other user's account to close down and yours to open up that wouldn't be feasible.

    One solution is to simply load all accounts at start up but I don't think the HW can allow for having multiple accounts loaded at once and running in the background due to RAM and CPU requirements, but also because of what it would do to the battery life.

    Furthermore, if you have multiple user accounts you then can't simply use a PIN for each user but also then require a unique username because a PIN could be duplicated. This would still be required even if you had TouchID because there are times when you still need to input your PIN.

    For these reasons I think multiple user accounts aren't feasible.


    PS: I'm wondering now if [@]John.B[/@] meant profiles, like how BB10 offers personal and work profiles. If so, then my apologizes.

    You don't need to change much between accounts. Have iOS connect to two different icloud accounts at once for mail, pictures and everything that is synced. Display the necessary content for each account. Mail can already display several accounts at once. Just hide those that are not necessary in that session. Do the same for pictures and favorites and some other stuff to begin with. I don't think it would use more resources than now.
  • Reply 19 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    clemynx wrote: »
    You don't need to change much between accounts. Have iOS connect to two different icloud accounts at once for mail, pictures and everything that is synced. Display the necessary content for each account. Mail can already display several accounts at once. Just hide those that are not necessary in that session. Do the same for pictures and favorites and some other stuff to begin with. I don't think it would use more resources than now.

    You're talking about the network resources, but what about the accounts themselves. Have you tried running multiple accounts on a Mac or WinPC? How long does it take to load that desktop. Have you simply switched (not logged out) to another account and not noticed it was slower simply from having additional resources utilized?

    Consider what's happening for the network to keep being polled for additional mail accounts, for additional iMessage accounts, for additional Find My Friend, accounts, and on and on and on… These have to be running in some form. Now I do think Apple could create a separate "sys admin" account that could run these services as one account and then move data to the proper locations efficiently, but we're still talking additional resources to do this.

    But all that is beside the point when you consider how the Home Screens and apps currently work. How would they implement this? Would Infinity Blade III need to be in each account or only installed once? At 1.8GiB it's already a beast. If only once then how is the data for the game accessed when for 6 years of the App Store it's been saved in the game? You either need Apple to create some complex service that can place and pull user app specific data in each game when needed or you need Apple to change the way the SDK works and what they expect from developers. Neither of these seem like a simple task to me.
  • Reply 20 of 34
    d4njvrzfd4njvrzf Posts: 797member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    You're talking about the network resources, but what about the accounts themselves. Have you tried running multiple accounts on a Mac or WinPC? How long does it take to load that desktop. Have you simply switched (not logged out) to another account and not noticed it was slower simply from having additional resources utilized?



    Consider what's happening for the network to keep being polled for additional mail accounts, for additional iMessage accounts, for additional Find My Friend, accounts, and on and on and on… These have to be running in some form. Now I do think Apple could create a separate "sys admin" account that could run these services as one account and then move data to the proper locations efficiently, but we're still talking additional resources to do this.

     

     

    There's an important distinction between the implementation of multiple accounts on the Mac vs multiple accounts on tablets like the Nexus 7. Whereas desktop operating systems allow multiple applications to run truly concurrently, most applications for Android or iOS only run when visible. When you go to the home screen, lock the screen, or switch to another application, the current application saves its state, pauses, and ceases to consume CPU cycles; at this point, the application is ready to be killed at any time by the OS to free up memory. Therefore, the overhead of multiple user profiles on a tablet should be quite low. As you can see here (), switching users is pretty quick on a Nexus 7, and should be even faster on the beefier hardware of the iPad. A multiuser implementation for iOS might be simpler than Android's current implementation since iOS does not have to deal with third-party background services. 

     

    With regard to your example regarding network services, keep in mind that many of those services use push notifications, not active polling.

    Quote:

     I think Apple could use it's Mac OS experience to make an application repository that looks like each installed app is not each Home Screen if the user wants it. This would mean that a user could go to the App Store and download, say, Threes!* at 36MiB but it would appear instantly if another user on the device already had it installed


     

    I think this is basically how Android's implementation works.  "Luckily, apps that have been downloaded for one user don't take up extra storage space when downloaded by a second user. According to Google's documentation, the tablet simulates downloading and installing the app, but doesn't actually keep a second copy of the APK file." (http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/11/hands-on-multiple-users-lock-screen-widgets-round-out-android-4-2/)

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