10,000 rpm IDE???

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Is there ever going to be higher speed IDE hard drives so that IDE can get to >100 mb/s. Or I guess I don't know what the limiting factor is for disk access. Sure would like faster read and writes for 500mb AI files.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    [quote]Originally posted by Bigc:

    <strong>Is there ever going to be higher speed IDE hard drives so that IDE can get to &gt;100 mb/s. Or I guess I don't know what the limiting factor is for disk access. Sure would like faster read and writes for 500mb AI files.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    The speed of an HD depends on :

    - the number of rpm : note that the outside of the HD is faster than the inside

    - the number of head per plate

    - the density of the plate : the more density the faster.



    Some tricks accelerate the benchmarks of HD either like the disk cache; the lattest of the ide drive have 8 mB of cache. (average hd is 2 MB).



    10 000 and 15 000 rpm HD are noisy, 7200 are fine. The main progress concerning HD are based upon the density of information. In one or two years there will be very big hd reaching 300 to 500 GB with an incredible density on each plate : they will able to go beyond the 100 MB/Sec limit.
  • Reply 2 of 8
    spartspart Posts: 2,060member
    10,000 RPM? I like the silence of my iMac. Hopefully they can increase the speed without making it noisier...



    Just as a side note, I saw a 160GB IDE drive listed in ClubMac this morning...seems we are half way to 300GB. 275 bucks...5400RPM.
  • Reply 3 of 8
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    IDE drives popularity are predicated on Low Cost Storage I think it's possible but unlikely that they will attempt it because of pricing concerns.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    bigcbigc Posts: 1,224member
    Well if this is the case, ATA 100 and above are only going to be good for larger drives (you can partion larger drives and use them now). So ATA &gt;100 is a moot point??



    So this also means that the larger drives are just more platters and not higher density. Are higher bit-densities not possible in the near future???
  • Reply 5 of 8
    wmfwmf Posts: 1,164member
    Bit density is always getting higher so that drive makers can use fewer platters. These days I think they get 40GB/platter.



    Serial ATA is 150MB/s IIRC and it will be released later this year (who knows when Apple will support it, though).
  • Reply 6 of 8
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    [quote]Originally posted by wmf:

    <strong>Bit density is always getting higher so that drive makers can use fewer platters. These days I think they get 40GB/platter.



    Serial ATA is 150MB/s IIRC and it will be released later this year (who knows when Apple will support it, though).</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Never... If the iBook whiners of the world have their way They've been b-i-t-c-h-i-n-g ever since they heard the words Quarts Exterme can you imagine what they would sound like if Apple were to advance something else in the product line... <img src="graemlins/oyvey.gif" border="0" alt="[No]" />



    If Apple were to announce a G5 I think their heads would explode!



    Dave



    [ 05-24-2002: Message edited by: DaveGee ]</p>
  • Reply 7 of 8
    junkyard dawgjunkyard dawg Posts: 2,801member
    I think Apple has been slow to update their ATA 66 controller because ATA 100 doesn't provide much of a performance increase over ATA 66. The bottleneck is not the interface, but the drive itself. If an ATA 66 interface isn't saturated, then why update it?



    Apple's failure to implement DDR RAM is clearly due to Motorola's incompetence and not Apple's. Hell Apple even had to use a hack to put DDR on the XServe, because the G4 STILL doesn't support a DDR frontside bus!





    In contrast, things that Apple has complete control over, like Gigabit ethernet, are used long before other computer makers implement it.



    I think that we can expect some amazing improvements to the Powermacs within the next year or so.
  • Reply 8 of 8
    cdhostagecdhostage Posts: 1,038member
    Dude. fprget hard drives!



    I'm talking MRAM, baby! 100 gigs of nonvolatile storage that stores and retrieves information almost as fast as RAM!



    Then again, it's not quite ready yet. There's a 256MB (or is it Mb?) chip that cost millions to produce...

    Oh well. Maybe MRAM will appear in cell phones or other places that need nonvolatile memory soon. PDAs!
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