G-Technology to ship Thunderbolt 2 'Studio Series' RAID arrays in mid-May, up to 24TB

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2014
The latest entry in a growing selection of Thunderbolt 2 capable storage solutions, G-Technology's G-SPEED Studio and G-RAID Studio RAID arrays incorporate high-capacity 6TB HDDs and ultra-fast I/O into small chassis designs.



First announced at the National Association of Broadcasters event earlier in April, G-Technology's Studio lineup promises to deliver fast, configurable RAID solutions for digital media professionals. The company claims its products use the highest capacity hard disks available, clocking in at up to 6TB.

The top-end G-SPEED Studio models boast four-bay enclosures with a built-in RAID controller and user-selectable RAID 0, 1, 5 and 10. With a fast RAID 0 striped volume, the G-SPEED can hit transfer rates of up to 660MB/s and support daisy-chaining via dual Thunderbolt 2 ports.

With enterprise-class hard drives, the lineup can be configured in capacities of up to 24TB, meaning certain RAID configurations can hold up to 30 hours of 4K footage in ProRes 4444. In addition, the hardware supports multi-streamed 2K and 4K video to workstations for editing

On the lower end of the price spectrum is the G-RAID Studio lineup, a two-bay enclosure configurable with 7,200 RPM HDDs in capacities up to a total of 12TB. RAID options include RAID 0, RAID 1 and JBOD, while Thunderbolt 2 takes care of transfer with rates up to 360MB/s.

According to G-Technology, the G-RAID Studio series is ideal for real-time editing of large photo files or multiple streams of compressed 2K and 4K video.

While the company announced a release date sometime in May, MacMall is currently taking preorders for select configurations shipping in mid-May.

In the G-SPEED Studio series, prices start at $2,199.95 for 12TB of storage, while a 16TB version comes in at $2,699.95 and the high-capacity 24TB array is priced at $3,599.95. From the G-RAID Studio series, the 6TB model can be ordered for $699.95, while the 8TB and 12TB versions come in at $849.95 and $1,299.95, respectively.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    24TB eh? That'll be handy for backing up the album you've got on your Pono player.
  • Reply 2 of 31
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    It looks like they are going for a design that will match the new Mac Pro.
  • Reply 3 of 31
    solipsismx wrote: »
    It looks like they are going for a design that will match the new Mac Pro.

    Really? Looks a bit like a shredder to me.
  • Reply 4 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post





    Really? Looks a bit like a shredder to me.

     

    A shredder? I beg to differ...

    image 

  • Reply 5 of 31
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    It looks like they are going for a design that will match the new Mac Pro.

     

    What amuses me about that is that this looks more like a trashcan than the mac pro due to the lid. Aesthetic design doesn't influence purchasing decisions for me. It doesn't surprise me that peripheral vendors would want their complementary devices to match the base device. I just found it amusing.

  • Reply 6 of 31
    djkikromedjkikrome Posts: 189member
    Looks like a paper shredder & trash can in one. I like that. Need one of those.
  • Reply 7 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    In the G-SPEED Studio series, prices start at $2,199.95 for 12TB of storage, while a 16TB version comes in at $2,699.95 and the high-capacity 24TB array is priced at $3,599.95.

     

    This is why I settled for USB3 for my RAID. I can buy TWO 16TB USB3 LaCie units for what one of these costs.

  • Reply 8 of 31
    sennensennen Posts: 1,463member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

     

    This is why I settled for USB3 for my RAID. I can buy TWO 16TB USB3 LaCie units for what one of these costs.


     

    2x USB3 RAIDs running off the one bus on a new Mac Pro, unless you use a TB adapter, yeah? We opted for the Pegasus 2.

  • Reply 9 of 31
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,577member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

     

    This is why I settled for USB3 for my RAID. I can buy TWO 16TB USB3 LaCie units for what one of these costs.


    This is what really gets to me about A.I. today, the discussion begins about some technology relevant to the Mac or iOS and within a few posts is subverted by some stupid comment about an inferior competing platform or technology, which then becomes the focus of discussion. For this poster, go buy your two USB3 drives, we don't care less, got it. (Invoking the LaCie name is dickie too.)

  • Reply 10 of 31
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

     

    This is why I settled for USB3 for my RAID. I can buy TWO 16TB USB3 LaCie units for what one of these costs.


     

    There is also the option of Areca if you don't mind doing your own drive installation. It's not difficult to set up a raid. Just don't match inappropriate drives with anything that relies on parity to rebuild. My own results with support from some of the external drive oems hasn't been that great, so I mostly avoid them.

  • Reply 11 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

     
    This is what really gets to me about A.I. today, the discussion begins about some technology relevant to the Mac or iOS and within a few posts is subverted by some stupid comment about an inferior competing platform or technology, which then becomes the focus of discussion. For this poster, go buy your two USB3 drives, we don't care less, got it. (Invoking the LaCie name is dickie too.)


     

    Well, Great Arbiter of all that is Discussable, the point was perfectly relevant to the article. The new G-Tech units are expensive. Perhaps inappropriately expensive. This is demonstrated by a comparison to "inferior" but comparable-for-task alternatives, as in "Is there enough value in TB2 to justify a doubling of cost?"

     

    There was no reason for you to get bent out shape, and certainly no justification for you insulting me. I'm just gonna assume you were having a bad day.

  • Reply 12 of 31
    Late to the game. I just purchased an Areca 32TB thunderbolt Raid, its insanely fast. Not sure why G-Tech is only going for 24th
  • Reply 13 of 31
    frankiefrankie Posts: 369member
    Can you add SSD drives?

    What's the price without any drives?

    Their website doesn't work properly or I'd have these answers already.
  • Reply 14 of 31
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by frankie View Post



    Can you add SSD drives?



    What's the price without any drives?



    Their website doesn't work properly or I'd have these answers already.

     

    You can add SSD drives to anything that can fit 2.5" form factors, but it would be giant waste of money. I guess the one exception would be if they used proprietary firmware of some kind. Raids allow you to use multiple drives to increase bandwidth. It still hasn't caught up to the point where SSDs make sense there, and you still need a backup (SSDs can still die or suffer corruption). I don't know if they have any issues with certain raid types. For example I don't know how their error recovery works. I'm also fairly certain G-raids have never been supplied driveless.

  • Reply 15 of 31
    frankiefrankie Posts: 369member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hmm View Post

     

     

    You can add SSD drives to anything that can fit 2.5" form factors, but it would be giant waste of money. I guess the one exception would be if they used proprietary firmware of some kind. Raids allow you to use multiple drives to increase bandwidth. It still hasn't caught up to the point where SSDs make sense there, and you still need a backup (SSDs can still die or suffer corruption). I don't know if they have any issues with certain raid types. For example I don't know how their error recovery works. I'm also fairly certain G-raids have never been supplied driveless.


    Thanks for your reply.  I guess I was thinking of just using this as a simple drive with duplicate backup copy. (Raid 1 I guess)  

     

    Right now I have 12 4TB OWC drives with a drive and backup copy of it for all my video work but I need to go to something better.  I suppose I need to research more...Thanks for any info!

  • Reply 16 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by hmm View Post

     
    You can add SSD drives to anything that can fit 2.5" form factors, but it would be giant waste of money.


     

    I don't understand. Why would it be a waste?

  • Reply 17 of 31
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

     

    I don't understand. Why would it be a waste?


     

    A large raid can max out on bandwidth via the use of HDDs for less money. SSDs aren't a great improvement in reliability, but even fo the people who say they are, if you're going with a redundant Raid type, you gain some amount of fault tolerance for drive failure. It's just a dump of extra funds for lower overall capacity.

  • Reply 18 of 31
    christophbchristophb Posts: 1,422member
    This is why I settled for USB3 for my RAID. I can buy TWO 16TB USB3 LaCie units for what one of these costs.


    While you can compare stand alone or even the LaCie BigDisks software RAIDs, it's not A to A as these as well as the Promise has an integrated RAID controller. Needs may not justify the cost difference to the average-joe but offloading cache, striping and rebuild is important to many. This seems like a marked improvement over G's previous RAID offerings.

    If i did buy this, I would put it on the floor next to my paper shredder.
  • Reply 19 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ChristophB View Post



    these as well as the Promise has an integrated RAID controller. Needs may not justify the cost difference to the average-joe but offloading cache, striping and rebuild is important to many

     

    I don't understand your point. Which of the features you list is missing from the much less expensive LaCie 4Big?

  • Reply 20 of 31
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

     

     

    I don't understand your point. Which of the features you list is missing from the much less expensive LaCie 4Big?




    To start off, are you familiar with the difference between software and hardware based raid systems? There are further differences in that some controllers are far more robust than others.

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