IBM began mass adoption of iOS prior to its exclusive partnership with Apple, Inc.

Posted:
in iPad edited August 2014
When Apple and IBM announced plans to codevelop new iOS apps and jointly sell and support iPhones and iPad to enterprise customers, the news was greeted as if it were a new experiment. However, the deal is actually an extension of IBM's mobile strategy that has included massive deployments of iOS devices and native apps.



In a 2012 presentation on the company's "mobile transformation," IBM described its global organization as involving more than 425,000 employees and detailed that it managed 500,000 PCs, most of which were Lenovo (formerly IBM) PCs running Windows.

The company also detailed 100,000 "corporate liable" mobile phones (including 30,000 BlackBerry devices and 29,000 other smartphones and tablets) in addition to 50,000 employees who were reimbursed for their personal wireless expenses.

IBM's mobile push

At the time, IBM described an internal project (MESA) aimed at creating a "framework of reusable web-services that can be leveraged by mobile applications," and detailed over 40 internal IBM web apps targeting at mobile devices. The company also made prominent mention of Android, and detailed mobile device requirements that restricted some corporate data to BlackBerry devices.

However, last November IBM acquired Fiberlink, obtaining its MaaS360 cloud-based Mobile Device Management service and integrating into its product portfolio.

IBM isn't just selling MaaS360 as an alternative to other MDM offerings (including Good Technology, Microsoft's Enterprise Mobile Suite and BlackBerry Enterprise Server); it also began aggressively deploying the product internally, starting with IBM's CIO Office.

In March, IBM issued a white paper outlining that its "CIO Office manages about one hundred-thousand IBM employees' smartphones and tablets," and had initiated plans to migrate 90 percent of these devices to MaaS360 "within one month."

Bill Tworek, IBM's executive IT architect for CIO Office, noted that his group began "on-boarding devices on MaaS360 five days after the close of acquisition--15,000 on the first day and over 30,000 in the first week," adding that "it took us less than 3 days to integrate MaaS360 into the IBM architecture and by moving from an on-premises model to a cloud model we'll save US $500,000."

Given that the majority of mobile device at IBM had been BlackBerry phones, that suggests a rapid migration from BES, an "on-premises" MDM that is not inexpensive to license and operate. That also underscores why BlackBerry's stock took such a hit when IBM and Apple announced their partnership.

Enterprise apps going native with iOS

However, there are two other platform shifts IBM's rapid migration and "MobileFirst" strategy highlight. First is that IBM is no longer targeting web apps as the way to approach mobile development.

Echoing the observations of FaceBook's chief executive Mark Zuckerberg, who in late 2012 stated that "the biggest mistake we made as a company was betting too much on HTML5 instead of native [platform development]," IBM's new partnership with Apple focuses on native apps.

"Right now, engineers, designers, and developers from both organizations are working on more than 100 end-to-end mobile solutions, including a new category of mobile apps, that are ready for the enterprise," the company states. "Each will address a specific industry need and is being designed from the ground up with cloud software services for analytics, data security, and device management native to iOS."

Building native apps for iOS that are designed to sell iPhone and iPad as part of a compete, managed solution is a primary blow to BlackBerry's enterprise-centric strategy aimed at resuscitating its sales. But it's also a blow to Android, which lacks critical enterprise support in software and introduces hardware fragmentation issues.

It's also more bad news for Microsoft's struggling Windows Phone, which is currently selling primarily to low end consumer markets. Additionally, it's also a bad for Windows PCs, hybrid devices and tablets that are struggling to fend off sales erosion due to the increasing adoption of iPads among mobile workers.

New push in Enterprise adoption of Macs

Outside of iOS, there's also another significant new benefactor to IBM's partnership with Apple: Mac sales. That's because native iOS app development requires Apple's Xcode, which remains exclusive to OS X.

Roman Foeckl, the chief executive of CoSoSys, an enterprise security firm that sells PC security and Mobile Device Management tools, noted in an email that "Apple has learned a lot from its huge deployment of iOS devices in the enterprise. With iOS devices gaining popularity amongst traditionally Windows agnostic users, the tide has started to shift dramatically." "with IBM's added expertise about enterprise needs, we could finally start to see a significant shift in the balance over control of the enterprise IT" - Roman Foeckl, CEO CoSoSys

Foeckl added, "This trend is confirmed by yesterday's Apple quarterly announcement of a 17.6% increase in Mac sales (Q3 2013 vs. Q3 2014) with a total of 4.41m Macs sold. Many of them are being sold to enterprise customers and the partnership announcement with IBM will continue fueling this trend. IBM knows the enterprise needs.

"The IBM - Apple partnership announced last week was seen as unexpected, but in reality IBM has been one of the biggest users of iOS and Mac products for several years now. What was surprising, however, is that this announcement happened the same week as the news that Microsoft was reducing their workforce by 18,000 (even though mainly effecting Nokia).

"Apple products have been gaining serious market share in the enterprise over the past few years, and now with IBM's added expertise about enterprise needs, we could finally start to see a significant shift in the balance over control of the enterprise IT."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 40
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,623member
    Encircle, then suffocate.
    Isolate, then overwhelm.
    Isolate, suffocate, eradicate.
    I'm running out of catch phrases.

    Up until now, I've always thought that Windows will always remain a fixture in enterprise computing no matter how successful iOS is. But IBM and Apple in partnership, they probably have enough pieces to offer a migration path for erstwhile Windows shops. It won't happen overnight but consider the possibilities.

    Would be quite karmic, the two companies that Gates sort of treacherously pulled the rug from under come back 30 years later to bury Microsoft. It's so Shakespearean. Or Sophoclean.
  • Reply 2 of 40
    It will be AWESOME when Apple takes over IBM and FORCES people to use OSX at work.

    FREEDOM, becuase AMERICA
  • Reply 3 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Torrid Foster View Post



    It will be AWESOME when Apple takes over IBM and FORCES people to use OSX at work.



    FREEDOM, becuase AMERICA

    At least we'll have a choice between OS X and Windows at work. OS X is nicer to stare at during the day. :D

  • Reply 4 of 40
    formosaformosa Posts: 261member

    The MaasS360 website already touts increased security and control with iOS7 using their cloud MDM.

     

    My takeaway from this article is that HTML5 isn't as efficient as expected, and a "closed wall" solution (iOS) is more optimal, even if you throw all your eggs in one basket.

  • Reply 5 of 40
    dugbugdugbug Posts: 283member
    Maybe this will drive a Mac mini update
  • Reply 6 of 40

    Sounds like IBM needs something to "Sell!"

     

    Best.

  • Reply 7 of 40
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,367member
    tundraboy wrote: »
    Encircle, then suffocate.
    Isolate, then overwhelm.
    Isolate, suffocate, eradicate.
    I'm running out of catch phrases.

    Up until now, I've always thought that Windows will always remain a fixture in enterprise computing no matter how successful iOS is. But IBM and Apple in partnership, they probably have enough pieces to offer a migration path for erstwhile Windows shops. It won't happen overnight but consider the possibilities.

    Would be quite karmic, the two companies that Gates sort of treacherously pulled the rug from under come back 30 years later to bury Microsoft. It's so Shakespearean. Or Sophoclean.


    ..... a dish best served cold .... :smokey:

    Next, add Google to the menu ...
  • Reply 8 of 40
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,396member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    ..... a dish best served cold .... image



    Next, add Google to the menu ...

     

    I hear the agonized screams of Android trolls in my nightmares...

  • Reply 9 of 40
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post



    Encircle, then suffocate.

    Isolate, then overwhelm.

    Isolate, suffocate, eradicate.

     

     

    Reminds me Microsoft's old M.O. when it came to standards ... Embrace, Extend, Extinguish

     

    Karma's a bitch!

  • Reply 10 of 40
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Does anybody else hear Steve Job's voice saying 'International Bozo Machines' whenever they read 'IBM'?
  • Reply 11 of 40
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,306member

    I painfully remember the old days of ‘embrace and extend’ which usually ended with Macs being frozen out of business and online commerce. I remember the ‘this site only works with IE’ popups. I remember the disdain and denigration of Apple users (well, that’s still going on via the Android sycophant crowd). This seems to be karma coming back in spades to Microsoft.

  • Reply 12 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post



    Would be quite karmic, the two companies that Gates sort of treacherously pulled the rug from under come back 30 years later to bury Microsoft. It's so Shakespearean. Or Sophoclean.

     

    It's also a bit irrelevant to the bulk of buyers who today don't even remember the events you refer to, because of forgetfulness of age, or inexperience of youth. But Bill Gates built a giant company, took his money and got out, with enough time left in life to enjoy the spoils of his business victories.  The Microsoft of today is a different company.  Different people, different products, different goals and different MO.  Just as Apple is a very different company than it was 30 years ago--it is no longer the underdog, it no longer has its founders running the show.  Unfortunately, Mr. Jobs didn't get the same opportunity to enjoy his spoils that Gates did. But that's life and the risk we take.  IBM is different too.  As is HP.  I'm not saying that the companies are any worse now, or better, just that they're different.  They endure beyond their people, as is the nature of a corporation, unless they get bought up. The sands of time will continue to shift.  

     

    The application of ancient philosophies to describe the situation is just... well out of place, to my thinking.

  • Reply 13 of 40
    formosa wrote: »
    The MaasS360 website already touts increased security and control with iOS7 using their cloud MDM.

    My takeaway from this article is that HTML5 isn't as efficient as expected, and a "closed wall" solution (iOS) is more optimal, even if you throw all your eggs in one basket.

    And when corporations begin to assess iOS8 / OSX Yosemite and test out the potential benefits of Continuity innovations like Handoff, AirDrop & Notifications (working with 3rd party and web apps), the beachhead will have been cleared for MacBooks, iMacs and Mac Pros to invade the Enterprise in the wake of iPad & iPhone - GERONIMO!
  • Reply 14 of 40
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post



    Encircle, then suffocate.

    Isolate, then overwhelm.

    Isolate, suffocate, eradicate.

    I'm running out of catch phrases.



    Up until now, I've always thought that Windows will always remain a fixture in enterprise computing no matter how successful iOS is. But IBM and Apple in partnership, they probably have enough pieces to offer a migration path for erstwhile Windows shops. It won't happen overnight but consider the possibilities.



    Would be quite karmic, the two companies that Gates sort of treacherously pulled the rug from under come back 30 years later to bury Microsoft. It's so Shakespearean. Or Sophoclean.

    "Hold your friends close, but your enemies closer"

     

    IBM will be a fixture in the corporation until someone can virtualize a VM/MVS/zOS into a VMware partition that is as fast as the fastest current mainframe for less money.

     

    IBM has reinvented itself into a business consulting company that takes everything it custom builds, and makes a product out of it, because if IBM or one it's customer's has the problem, another 20 are out there looking for the same solution... especially if IBM consultants have the run of the CTO suite.

  • Reply 15 of 40
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by airmanchairman View Post





    And when corporations begin to assess iOS8 / OSX Yosemite and test out the potential benefits of Continuity innovations like Handoff, AirDrop & Notifications (working with 3rd party and web apps), the beachhead will have been cleared for MacBooks, iMacs and Mac Pros to invade the Enterprise in the wake of iPad & iPhone - GERONIMO!

    as stated in other threads... the numbers of devices sold will be amazingly small given the huge consumer market Apple has achieved (and the BYOD that can be exploited).   However, the cost for Dell/HP/Lenovo to remain in the WinTel device business will increase dramatically, as that's where their only  profits are.

  • Reply 16 of 40
    island hermitisland hermit Posts: 6,217member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

     

    I hear the agonized screams of Android trolls in my nightmares...


     

    Nightmares?

     

    I thought that would be some of your favorite dreams.

  • Reply 17 of 40
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    I painfully remember the old days of ‘embrace and extend’ which usually ended with Macs being frozen out of business and online commerce. I remember the ‘this site only works with IE’ popups. I remember the disdain and denigration of Apple users (well, that’s still going on via the Android sycophant crowd). This seems to be karma coming back in spades to Microsoft.


    In the web world...  this was the control feature... in the App world, frameworks will still only live at the interface veneer, and it will be some obvious architectural choices made to generalize features or have dual logic stacks to the same end for different platforms.  

     

    My guess is that Android and WinMobile Apps will continued to be developed against the same backend (non corporation wants to be single sourced), but the 1st choice will be iOS, for obvious reasons.  The worst scenarios being the 'code builder' development kits that drive interfaces down to the lowest common denominator (C++,Java, Dalvik, C#, Swift all out of the same metacode with 'interface frameworks' on the client and server side to convert back and forth)

  • Reply 18 of 40
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dugbug View Post



    Maybe this will drive a Mac mini update

    agreed.   although all those ugly black 1900x1200 screens and black keyboards and 3 button mice with rollers... YUCK!

  • Reply 19 of 40
    ..... a dish best served cold .... :smokey:


    Next, add Google to the menu ...

    I hear the agonized screams of Android trolls in my nightmares...

    No, no, for me the screams are music to my ears.
  • Reply 20 of 40
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,623member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

     

     

    It's also a bit irrelevant to the bulk of buyers who today don't even remember the events you refer to, because of forgetfulness of age, or inexperience of youth. But Bill Gates built a giant company, took his money and got out, with enough time left in life to enjoy the spoils of his business victories.  The Microsoft of today is a different company.  Different people, different products, different goals and different MO.  Just as Apple is a very different company than it was 30 years ago--it is no longer the underdog, it no longer has its founders running the show.  Unfortunately, Mr. Jobs didn't get the same opportunity to enjoy his spoils that Gates did. But that's life and the risk we take.  IBM is different too.  As is HP.  I'm not saying that the companies are any worse now, or better, just that they're different.  They endure beyond their people, as is the nature of a corporation, unless they get bought up. The sands of time will continue to shift.  

     

    The application of ancient philosophies to describe the situation is just... well out of place, to my thinking.


     

    Before you object to me anthropomorphizing corporations, be advised that no less than the Supreme Court of the United States has declared that . . .  corporations are people, my friend.  :-)

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