Apple Watch is first device category developed under Tim Cook, took years to complete

Posted:
in General Discussion edited September 2014
In a pair of interviews with ABC News following Tuesday's big hardware debut, Apple CEO Tim Cook and SVP of Design Jony Ive discussed the trials and tribulations of designing the company's first wearable device.




Speaking with ABC News' David Muir, Cook said Apple Watch came about after the death of company cofounder Steve Jobs, meaning the wearable is the first product category to be developed under Cook's watch.

When asked what Jobs would think of the iPhone 6 and Apple Watch, Cook made it a point to mention the tech guru's influence is being felt even now, nearly three years after his passing.

"I think he would be smiling today," Cook said. "I think he would be so proud that he left a company that continued after him where he could clearly see his DNA at the foundation of it. You can see Steve written all over the products we did today."

Cook also handled questions related to Apple Watch security, a valid concern given the wearable will have access to sensitive information that, in some cases, could include payment information. Along with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, Apple Watch has NFC built in to conduct touch-less Apple Pay payments.

The Apple chief said the wearable is the most secure solution on the market, noting credit card information is translated into a Device Account Number that is used in conjunction with a dynamically generated security transaction code. Apple Pay technology was first discovered in an Apple patent filing from 2012.


Source: ABC News


A final question from Muir asked about Apple's "Made in America" initiative, to which Cook said parts, services and machinery from 22 states are being used in the production of Apple Watch and the latest iPhone product lines.

As for Ive, Apple's design chief said his team took years to get the Apple Watch right. One of the hardest issues to address was making a very personal device attractive to a wide swath of consumers.

"We've always tried to make products that people don't begrudgingly use, but that they want to use," Ive said. "I think that the bar for that is very high when it's something that you wear. And it's something that you're going to wear all day, every day."


Source: ABC News


Apple Watch is expected to go on sale in early 2015 at a starting price of $349.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.
  • Reply 2 of 53
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.
    Charles Arthur, technology writer for the Guardian tweeted that the watch looks bulky in photos but it's not. He also tweeted that people who have used the Moto Almost 360 say it is way bigger and clunkier. I wonder how much the average persons opinion will change once they see it in person and try it on.
  • Reply 3 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.



    I wonder if the watch will have annual incremental updates like all other products.. 

    Apple Watch 2 - "Thinner Lighter Faster with Larger screen"

  • Reply 4 of 53
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.

     

    While thickness is relevant, I'd imagine that weight is a much larger factor.  A few grams doesn't really make a huge difference for a iPhone, iPhablet, or iPad, but it certainly will for an iWatch.

  • Reply 5 of 53
    rogifan wrote: »
    I wonder how much the average persons opinion will change once they see it in person and try it on.

    For Apple's sake I hope it's a lot, and Apple does have an excellent track record of getting people to change their first impressions after they use their products.

    I would be sold if I could have my Mac auto-unlock when I'm within x-feet of it, my iPhone lock when the BT connection is too far, and notify me when that happens which could indicate I left it somewhere.
  • Reply 6 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by simtub View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.



    I wonder if the watch will have annual incremental updates like all other products.. 

    Apple Watch 2 - "Thinner Lighter Faster with Larger screen"


     

    Bet on it.

  • Reply 7 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    I wonder how much the average persons opinion will change once they see it in person and try it on.




    For Apple's sake I hope it's a lot, and Apple does have an excellent track record of getting people to change their first impressions after they use their products.



    I would be sold if I could have my Mac auto-unlock when I'm within x-feet of it, my iPhone lock when the BT connection is too far, and notify me when that happens which could indicate I left it somewhere.

     

    Easy… I'm sure there will be a ton of Apps doing things like that.

  • Reply 8 of 53
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,509member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    For Apple's sake I hope it's a lot, and Apple does have an excellent track record of getting people to change their first impressions after they use their products.

    I would be sold if I could have my Mac auto-unlock when I'm within x-feet of it, my iPhone lock when the BT connection is too far, and notify me when that happens which could indicate I left it somewhere.

    You just reminded me of the times i've left my phone and my iPad and gotten them back only by sheer luck and human decency. If it could be aware of your stuff, it's worth the price right there.
  • Reply 9 of 53
    jakebjakeb Posts: 557member
    I'm sure there will be regular updates. They didn't hire 50 bio-sensor experts to make a heart rate monitor.
  • Reply 10 of 53
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    For Apple's sake I hope it's a lot, and Apple does have an excellent track record of getting people to change their first impressions after they use their products.

    So far the majority of hands on reports I've read have been positive. Maybe not "OMG this is the most beautiful thing I've ever laid eyes on" but a lot of them saying the fit and finish is better than any Android Wear device. Andy Ihnatko on MacBreak Weekly was very positive. He said the fit and finish was "perfect" and said it was better than the Moto Almost 360 (which he's using right now and really likes).

    Like I said, I think it will have to be seen in person to really be appreciated. I was initially "meh" but then I went to Apple's website and looked at all the HQ photos with all the different combinations and I was blown away at how nice it actually looked and how everything fit seamlessly together. I still think Apple has work to do to make me feel like I need to have this. So I hope by the time they launch it they have a killer feature or killer 3rd party apps that make it a must have.
  • Reply 11 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    For Apple's sake I hope it's a lot, and Apple does have an excellent track record of getting people to change their first impressions after they use their products.



    I would be sold if I could have my Mac auto-unlock when I'm within x-feet of it, my iPhone lock when the BT connection is too far, and notify me when that happens which could indicate I left it somewhere.

     

    I would be doubly sold if it could lock-up like the Batmobile upon the user exiting a pre-set proximity.

     

  • Reply 12 of 53
    rogifan wrote: »
    So far the majority of hands on reports I've read have been positive. Maybe not "OMG this is the most beautiful thing I've ever laid eyes on" but a lot of them saying the fit and finish is better than any Android Wear device. Andy Ihnatko on MacBreak Weekly was very positive. He said the fit and finish was "perfect" and said it was better than the Moto Almost 360 (which he's using right now and really likes).

    Like I said, I think it will have to be seen in person to really be appreciated. I was initially "meh" but then I went to Apple's website and looked at all the HQ photos with all the different combinations and I was blown away at how nice it actually looked and how everything fit seamlessly together. I still think Apple has work to do to make me feel like I need to have this. So I hope by the time they launch it they have a killer feature or killer 3rd party apps that make it a must have.

    1) I have no doubt the fit and finish is great. It looks so good that I'd like that aspect compared to the fit and finish of regular watches at that price point.

    2) I do think a round face would look better but I'm also certain Apple tested that concept and didn't go with it for a variety of reasons. Perhaps cost of a round display or the ability to get enough round displays for their needs was an issue. Certainly Motorola doesn't expect to sell as many 360s as Apple will sell iWatches*. Regardless, they have a good track record of balancing decisions well, and it will come down to the SW in the end.


    * Just typing Watches seems like I'm not being clear, and ?Watches seems funky and could also be misinterpreted as excluding the Sport and Edition models so I'll be using iWatches to refer to the whole lot.

    bobschlob wrote: »
    I would be doubly sold if it could lock-up like the Batmobile upon the user exiting a pre-set proximity.

    [image]

    I'm not a fan of that batmobile, but I love the Tumbler. That thing is bad ass.
  • Reply 13 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jakeb View Post



    I'm sure there will be regular updates. They didn't hire 50 bio-sensor experts to make a heart rate monitor.

    Agreed, and they didn't talk to the FDA about a simple heart rate monitor.  Other sensors will come - when who knows.

  • Reply 14 of 53

    I'm happy with the move towards using "?" in the name instead of "i".  The whole iThing was growing a bit old at this point.

  • Reply 15 of 53
    ?Watch. Shift-Option-K. Gotta remember that. Shift-Option-K, Shift-Option-K....
  • Reply 16 of 53
    Looks impresdive on Apple's website; can't wait to see it up close!

    Great job Apple Team, the naysayers have been silenced.
  • Reply 17 of 53
    solipsismx wrote: »
    That is so much thicker than I was expecting. I hope for that size it has a decent battery life for a "smartwatch" with color display.

    Not me. And for the amount of tech they put inside I don't even think it's thick, when compared to sports watches (I've showed pictures before, I'm sure you've seen that one). Besides, evolution will take care of the thickness. Especially now that 'the competition' knows what to put inside a smartwatch.

    The battery is so easily charged I think normal use will only require it to charge overnight. Though I'm sure there will be many complaints the first couple of weeks when the whole world is playing with it, trying out each and every app, draining the battery way faster than 'normal use'.

    edit: I also think it's incredibly cheap. A starting price of $349 is similar to sports watches. I'm in the market for a triathlon watch and am probably choosing the Suunto Ambit 3, $600. But that one is waterproof and has different features, obviously. Can't really compare these...



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  • Reply 18 of 53
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member

    It's a shame that it doesn't come with GPS. Sounds like if you go running, and want to track your route, you'll need to also carry your iPhone.

     

    I will no doubt end up buying one anyway. :)

  • Reply 19 of 53

    battery is difficult, so small and not just a quartz gizmo inside. batteries are changing, just not fast enough it seems. i just hope apple does not pull a motorola and be dishonest about their battery.

     

    and something tells me that samsung and friends will get a new input style.

     

    http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/09/moto-360-teardown/

  • Reply 20 of 53
    enzosenzos Posts: 344member
    What OS will it run? Is one reason for Swift being developed?
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