What is Power?

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
For those interested who weren't following the M$N vs. AOL Ads thread, there was a request for the old 'What is Power?' ads Apple did in the 90's. They've been posted at the following URL, for interested parties...



<a href="http://www.mac3d.com/power/"; target="_blank">http://www.mac3d.com/power/</a>;

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    What is Power?



    Power is the ability to show up to a party uninvited and completely unknown to anyone present, and within half an hour go home with the hottest woman there, and shag her all night long. That is power.



    Any questions?
  • Reply 2 of 8
    serranoserrano Posts: 1,806member
    thank you thank you thank you
  • Reply 3 of 8
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Power is the exertion of Energy (Work) over a period of time.



    Engineers don't understand the whole concept of shagging. Pleasse elaborate.
  • Reply 4 of 8
    [quote]Originally posted by Junkyard Dawg:

    <strong>What is Power?



    Power is the ability to show up to a party uninvited and completely unknown to anyone present, and within half an hour go home with the hottest woman there, and shag her all night long. That is power.



    Any questions?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Usually, it is not your power...it's her power...that agrees to a shagging experience... <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
  • Reply 5 of 8
    paulpaul Posts: 5,278member
    [quote]Originally posted by Splinemodel:

    <strong>Power is the exertion of Energy (Work) over a period of time.



    Engineers don't understand the whole concept of shagging. Pleasse elaborate. </strong><hr></blockquote>



    isnt power also torque? or am i going to fail my AP physics exam?
  • Reply 6 of 8
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    No, torque is rotational force. That is, linear force times a radius. So if you put x amount of force on the handle of a long wrench, you'll exert more torque that you would with a short wrench.



    Force = dp/dt

    Kinetic E = [Integral]p*dv = 1/2 * m * v^2

    Power = dE/dt



    Power = (S(S Force *dt)dv) / dt

    Where "S" is an integral sign.



    Interestingly enough, a G4 has a lot less power, in a traditional sense, than does a Pentium. The Pentium dissipates a whole lot more wattage. Information theory is a bit different than conventional physics.



    [ 03-16-2002: Message edited by: Splinemodel ]</p>
  • Reply 7 of 8
    paulpaul Posts: 5,278member
    the scary part is, that i actually understood most of that... <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
  • Reply 8 of 8
    Those are the mechanical definitions of power. The SI unit for power is joules per second(J/s). This can be relevant in many fields. In chemistry, one can calculate the power output of exothermic reactions such as in combustion in a car or nuclear reactions from E=mc^2 if one knows the reaction time. Dealing with electricity, watts' units are J/s(amperes times volts). This is most relevant to the G4.



    If a G4 tower comsumes 200 watts, then it's the equivalent of lifting a 100 kg object by 20 centimeters every second.



    Of course, a PowerBook G4 has a 50 watt power supply and weighs about 2.5 kg. You would have to lift one from rest by two meters every second to do the same work it does!



    [ 03-17-2002: Message edited by: Nostradamus ]</p>
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