Samsung feeling the squeeze from success of Apple's iPhone 6 & 6 Plus, Kantar says

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2015
Virtually everywhere in the world that research firm Kantar Worldpanel ComTech tracks smartphone market data, Apple saw marketshare gains, thanks to the popularity of its latest flagship iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus handsets.




Kantar's latest sales data through the end of November 2014, published on Wednesday, found that the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus led to gains for Apple in every single market tracked, except Japan.

Perhaps hurt greatest by Apple's success was rival Samsung, which saw its market share fall in both the U.S. and Europe. Google's Android platform also saw its share drop in the U.S. and most markets in Europe.

For example, in the U.S., the iPhone accounted for 47.4 percent of sales, according to Kantar. That was a 4.3 percentage point increase from the same period tracked by the firm in 2013.

Kantar estimates that the iPhone 6 alone accounted for 19 percent of total American smartphone sales. Of all iPhone models, the company projects AT&T made up 57 percent of sales.

In Europe's biggest markets --?Britain, Germany, France, Italy and Spain --?Android fell 3.2 percentage points year over year in the face of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus launch. In particular, Great Britain saw Android's market share fall 6.7 percentage points, while Apple surged to 42.5 percent of U.K. sales.

"The longer the new iPhone models are on the market the more their appeal will extend beyond Apple's loyal customers. For now customer switching from Android to iOS remains stable at 18 percent," said Dominic Sunnebo, strategic insight director at Kantar Worldpanel ComTech Europe.




And in China, Apple's market share grew an estimated 1.1 percentage points, giving the iPhone an 18.1 percent of the market, according to Kantar.

As for Japan, the only market where Kantar found Apple didn't grow its market share, the iPhone was hurt by a difficult year over year comparison. That's because in 2013, Apple debuted NTT DoCoMo as a carrier partner, boosting sales significantly.

Overall smartphone penetration reached an estimated 58 percent in the U.S., and 65 percent across Europe's biggest countries. Among holdouts, 47 percent of feature phone owners in the U.S. and 35 percent in Europe said they still aren't planning to get a smartphone.

"While die-hard feature phone owners state they are not planning to buy a smartphone in the next 12 months, they might not have a choice as vendors continue to transition their portfolio away from feature phones to smartphones," said Carolina Milanesi, chief of research at Kantar Worldpanel ComTech.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    red oakred oak Posts: 628member
    These are seismic shifts. It is only going to grow when Kantor reports Decenber. Now 23% share across EU5

    Windows looks done

    Looks like achieving sustainable 20% WW share is still realm of possibility
  • Reply 2 of 33
    dugbugdugbug Posts: 283member
    "die-hard feature phone owners state they are not planning to buy a smartphone"

    wow. these people exist.
  • Reply 3 of 33
    dugbug wrote: »
    "die-hard feature phone owners state they are not planning to buy a smartphone"

    wow. these people exist.

    80 year olds?

    To recycle a Jobs quote, eventually death will take care of this.
  • Reply 4 of 33
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,972member
    dugbug wrote: »
    "die-hard feature phone owners state they are not planning to buy a smartphone"

    wow. these people exist.

    Many people don't need, nor want a smartphone.
  • Reply 5 of 33

    These idiots still not getting it ...

     

    It's NOT just Apple's hardware that ROCKS ... it's also iOS vs stupid adware / spyware / crapware / stoleware called google's android which SUCKS!

    :smokey:

  • Reply 6 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,608member

    Is this the seasonal spike that occurs when a new iPhone model is released or is it something new and sustainable? I have trouble understanding how analysts and researchers can come up with 180° opposite results and opinions when it comes to many things, not just Apple. 

     

    In my own immediate family we are 100% Apple. Wife, myself, two sons, one daughter, one son-in-law, one son’s girlfriend all have iPhones and Macs. Not because of my evangelism but it’s just that way. Nobody seems even remotely interested in switching, My youngest son switched from two Android phones (HTC, Samsung) to iPhone as he had had enough with hardware and software issues.

  • Reply 7 of 33
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,626member
    But but but open!

    Still analysts will spin this as a negative for Apple: If Apple captures the market now, where's the growth in the future?
  • Reply 8 of 33



    They are comparing this year's season spike to the prior year's seasonal spike and it is higher across the board except Japan.  Japan last year numbers were insane at 69% but DoCoMo was new to iPhone and happens to be Japan's largest carrier.  China's numbers are particularly impressive since the iPhone was released later this year than prior year.

     

    More important than the height of the increase will be its length.  iPhone is still in shortage so the height is limited by production.  Higher production leads to a higher spike but higher production with longer length means translates to growth.

  • Reply 9 of 33
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,964member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post





    80 year olds?



    To recycle a Jobs quote, eventually death will take care of this.

     

    Well my Grandma, almost 90 just had to replace her phone and got a cheap Android ZTE Smart Phone.  Small screen, your basic cheap Android phone which is a very large percentage that gets sold, barely know how to do much more then making a call from the thing.   

  • Reply 10 of 33
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,558member
    jbdragon wrote: »
    Well my Grandma, almost 90 just had to replace her phone and got a cheap Android ZTE Smart Phone.  Small screen, your basic cheap Android phone which is a very large percentage that gets sold, barely know how to do much more then making a call from the thing.   

    I believe this is what they call "elder abuse".
  • Reply 11 of 33
    nairbnairb Posts: 253member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    Is this the seasonal spike that occurs when a new iPhone model is released or is it something new and sustainable? I have trouble understanding how analysts and researchers can come up with 180° opposite results and opinions when it comes to many things, not just Apple. 

     


     

    While this is the seasonal spike period, it compares it to same period last year - also a seasonal spike period. Sales in the spike period are up over last years spike, which shows overall growth in these markets.

  • Reply 12 of 33
    "...switching from Android to iOS remains stable at 18 percent."

    [COLOR=blue]I like that number a lot. [/COLOR]While the only users switching from iOS to Android or Windows phones come on this site to tell us about it. Windows and Blackberry as so far behind Apple and Android that they didn't even merit an honorable mention in the above story.

    When you think about it, ApplePay is barely kicking in, the Apple Watch is several months away, the CarPlay initiative is waiting for a new release of automobiles and the IBM/Apple partnership is only now getting in front of enterprise... can you imagine, if Apple doesn't announce anything new in 2015, it will still be a banner year for Apple next year from now just from what is already gathering steam....!

    If Apple crushes it with an innovative new MBA (as rumored), the Mac side of Apple may move into new territory percentage-wise in the overall PC market.
  • Reply 13 of 33
    schlackschlack Posts: 679member
    10 yrs from now, will there will be a retro market of simple phones that don't do anything but make calls...that everyone will think is cool?
  • Reply 14 of 33
    jbdragon wrote: »
    Well my Grandma, almost 90 just had to replace her phone and got a cheap Android ZTE Smart Phone.  Small screen, your basic cheap Android phone which is a very large percentage that gets sold, barely know how to do much more then making a call from the thing.   

    I believe this is what they call "elder abuse".

    Meanwhile 100-year-old Virginia is totally enjoying her Apple iPad and it's various apps. ( )
  • Reply 15 of 33
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by schlack View Post



    10 yrs from now, will there will be a retro market of simple phones that don't do anything but make calls...that everyone will think is cool?

    No.

  • Reply 16 of 33
    red oak wrote: »
    These are seismic shifts. It is only going to grow when Kantor reports Decenber. Now 23% share across EU5

    Windows looks done

    I think IDC could cook up numbers to support a Windows victory. It's what they do best.
  • Reply 17 of 33
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    Many people don't need, nor want a smartphone.

     

    An elder relative of mine loves her 17" MBP and her 4th-gen iPad... but when her hubby gifted her an iPhone, she freaked.  The gift card lay unused for well over a year, until her clamshell finally croaked.  She hates her new phone, because it doesn't act like a phone (to her way of thinking).

     

    So, as a back-burner project, I want to figure out how to get her 5S to mimic the user experience she's comfortable with... which might be as simple as having the phone wake directly to the phone keypad, rather than the home screen...

  • Reply 18 of 33
    jmc54jmc54 Posts: 195member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JBDragon View Post

     

     

    Well my Grandma, almost 90 just had to replace her phone and got a cheap Android ZTE Smart Phone.  Small screen, your basic cheap Android phone which is a very large percentage that gets sold, barely know how to do much more then making a call from the thing.   




    My mother in law is in her 80's and we got her a base model iphone 6 and she's a texting, picture taking monster!

  • Reply 19 of 33
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    Is this the seasonal spike that occurs when a new iPhone model is released or is it something new and sustainable? I have trouble understanding how analysts and researchers can come up with 180° opposite results and opinions when it comes to many things, not just Apple. 


    Analysts all have their own agenda based upon who is paying them for their results.  They have no basis in reality, and pretty much make up numbers so that their reports look the way their clients want them to.  That's why you frequently see so many "others" when they are trying to downplay Apple's market share.  Completely made up numbers that mean nothing, but unfortunately, some idiots believe them.

  • Reply 20 of 33
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,972member
    pscooter63 wrote: »
    An elder relative of mine loves her 17" MBP and her 4th-gen iPad... but when her hubby gifted her an iPhone, she freaked.  The gift card lay unused for well over a year, until her clamshell finally croaked.  She hates her new phone, because it doesn't act like a phone (to her way of thinking).

    So, as a back-burner project, I want to figure out how to get her 5S to mimic the user experience she's comfortable with... which might be as simple as having the phone wake directly to the phone keypad, rather than the home screen...

    A T9 keypad might help as well.
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