Apple making Campus 2 components in its own factory, initially considered 'trilobal' design

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2015
When Apple's now-famous new campus opens next year, it will feature numerous parts created by the company's in-house design group and manufactured in a California factory built specifically for the project.

Campus 2 Ring


Jony Ive and his team are responsible for the design of the new building's precast "void slabs," according to The New Yorker. Each of the more than 4,000 pieces forms the floor, ceiling, and mechanical interstitial space of the building's four stories, and will be slotted together like a large puzzle after being made in a purpose-built factory just up the highway.

Last week, AppleInsider presented a video tour showing the first of these slabs being lined up and assembled into a foundational structure of the Spaceship Ring (below).


Slabs being assembled in the Apple Campus 2 Ring, viewed from the north


"We're assembling rather than building," Ive said of the project.

Ive has reportedly been intimately involved with the new building's details --?going so far as to prescribe a small curve where the floors meet the walls -- and it's implied that he pushed famed British architect Sir Norman Foster for the job. Foster's firm is also handling the renovation and seismic retrofit of Ive's house in the tony Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco.

Ive praised the building's circular design, calling it "a remarkably pragmatic way of connecting the right groups," but the famous spaceship shape was not the first choice. The initial plan was "trilobal" --?something like a large Y, in which each stem is evenly spaced and of equal lengths.

Apple's industrial design team has also worked with Foster's group on the building's staircases, signage, and the design of the visitor center.

Ive seems somewhat melancholy when discussing the new building, recalling late Apple CEO Steve Jobs's contributions.

"This is something that Steve cared about passionately," Ive said. "There is a bittersweetness here, because this is obviously about the future, but every time I come here it makes me think of the past as well--and just the sadness. I just wish he could have seen it."

Once complete, Ive's group will occupy some 30,000 square feet on the interior portion of the building's top floor. Both the industrial design and human interface teams will share the space.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 43
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    [QUOTE]"This is something that Steve cared about passionately," Ive said. "There is a bittersweetness here, because this is obviously about the future, but every time I come here it makes me think of the past as well--and just the sadness. I just wish he could have seen it."[/QUOTE]

    This makes me really sad too. I wish Steve was here to see it too. :(
  • Reply 2 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    This makes me really sad too. I wish Steve was here to see it too. image



    Something came to mind this morning.

     

    In 1971, someone commented to Mike Vance (creative director of Walt Disney Studios at the time) "Isn't it too bad Walt Disney didn't live to see this?" (referring to Walt Disney World)

     

    "He did see it." Vance replied simply. "That's why it's here."

     

    I imagine the same applies to Jobs. It's his vision still driving the project.

  • Reply 3 of 43
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,190member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     



    Something came to mind this morning.

     

    In 1971, someone commented to Mike Vance (creative director of Walt Disney Studios at the time) "Isn't it too bad Walt Disney didn't live to see this?" (referring to Walt Disney World)

     

    "He did see it." Vance replied simply. "That's why it's here."

     

    I imagine the same applies to Jobs. It's his vision still driving the project.


     

    Yes, it exists because of his vision. But massive credit has to go to those who followed Steve, as they easily had the power to compromise, corrupt, and destroy that vision. They did not, not for the HQ, not for the company, and not for the products. They have been able to greatly improve and expand Apple's products and influence, while remaining true to the same guiding principles. That's not an easy feat. It was brilliant of SJ to appoint Tim as his successor, as I truly believe the company would have fared much worse under anyone else, including anyone from Apple's executive team. Tim has the pragmatism, the humility, character, and the wisdom to make things work and keep everything on the right track, when where there is no track so to speak. Tim isn't the next Jobs, but he's the next best thing- he's someone who knows how to run a company, is insightful about the future, ambitious, and knows and get everyone to do their best possible work. 

  • Reply 4 of 43
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    This makes me really sad too. I wish Steve was here to see it too. image



    Something came to mind this morning.

     

    In 1971, someone commented to Mike Vance (creative director of Walt Disney Studios at the time) "Isn't it too bad Walt Disney didn't live to see this?" (referring to Walt Disney World)

     

    "He did see it." Vance replied simply. "That's why it's here."

     

    I imagine the same applies to Jobs. It's his vision still driving the project.


     

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).

  • Reply 5 of 43
    Very well put. Totally agree.
  • Reply 6 of 43
    This is quintessential Apple - the attention to detail reaches levels that probably no one would even bother to focus on.

    Of all of Steve Jobs achievements - what he achieved with his team is probably the biggest one. These are some of the smartest people in the world - and the respect, love and affection they have for Jobs is so obvious even today.

    I think Apple is executing at a level that would make Steve Jobs proud - and I truly believe the best of Apple is yet to come. Everyone who thinks Apple will find it tough to replicate the success of the last few years simply has no clue what they are talking about!
  • Reply 7 of 43
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).




    Good point.

     

    I recall reading how unsafe neighborhoods with tall buildings were compared to places that had the same density, but the buildings were effectively laid down on their side, and those places were much more community minded and safer.

  • Reply 8 of 43

    Trilobal?

     

     

  • Reply 9 of 43
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post



    Very well put. Totally agree.

     

     

    Thanks.

  • Reply 10 of 43
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).


     

    The new campus looks amazing. I'm sure it will set trends for many decades to come.

     

    The only thing that worries me is that every time I've worked for a company that grew into a new cutting-edge campus, they fell on hard times and ended up leasing most of it out. Of course, I can point to mistakes made in those cases, and cannot in Apple's case. They are doing incredible things, and they just plain need this campus for the next step.

  • Reply 11 of 43
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).


     

    That's like how I feel about outdoor ad signage.

     

    Look at what they did in São Paulo: it's beautiful!

  • Reply 12 of 43
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,490member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).


    While I think the ever-taller skyscrapers in Manhattan are horrible primarily because they're reducing the amount of light hitting the street, the downside of low-height development is that it takes more ground space and therefore, you lose more greenery.     

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     



    Something came to mind this morning.

     

    In 1971, someone commented to Mike Vance (creative director of Walt Disney Studios at the time) "Isn't it too bad Walt Disney didn't live to see this?" (referring to Walt Disney World)

     

    "He did see it." Vance replied simply. "That's why it's here."

     

    I imagine the same applies to Jobs. It's his vision still driving the project.


    Biographies of Disney that I've read seem to indicate that while he was initially happy with the plans for Disney World because they were buying enough land to control space around the park and to accomplish what they wanted to achieve, Disney didn't really care about the amusement parks.   He's quoted as saying, "we know how to do this already".    Walt was primarily concerned about EPCOT, which was not supposed to be a World's Fair exhibit, but an actual community where people lived (Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow).    

     

    There was an area built on the grounds where people live (I seem to remember visiting there once), but if it's still there (is it?) my understanding is that it wasn't particularly unique in its technology or commercially successful.   Some years ago, there were tremendous maintenance problems because the homes did not have robust construction.    My guess is that Disney would have been thrilled with the profits and size of the current Disney corporation, but not necessarily with most of the products or the parks and especially not how expensive it is to visit a Disney park.   Would Walt have supported the Lucasfilm, Pixar, Jim Henson and Marvel acquisitions?   Hard to say.  

  • Reply 13 of 43
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    We already knew about the trilobal building, and also that it was discarded also in part because Jobs' son said it looked like a penis. Jobs said it wasn't true but then couldn't remove the image from his head. I forgot where AlI read that.
  • Reply 14 of 43
    zoetmb wrote: »
    There was an area built on the grounds where people live (I seem to remember visiting there once), but if it's still there (is it?) my understanding is that it wasn't particularly unique in its technology or commercially successful.   Some years ago, there were tremendous maintenance problems because the homes did not have robust construction.    My guess is that Disney would have been thrilled with the profits and size of the current Disney corporation, but not necessarily with most of the products or the parks and especially not how expensive it is to visit a Disney park.   Would Walt have supported the Lucasfilm, Pixar, Jim Henson and Marvel acquisitions?   Hard to say.  
    Celebration, Florida is doing just fine. I've been living here for about ten years. In fact, as with many areas in Florida, new construction has resumed with single- and multi-family neighborhoods going up. Technology wasn't exactly special here for the longest time but our local telco (formerly a division of Disney too) is installing Gbps fiber-to-the-home right now.

    Disney also has a new development that is actually on WDW property called Golden Oak. Starts at $1.5M.
  • Reply 15 of 43
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post



    We already knew about the trilobal building, and also that it was discarded also in part because Jobs' son said it looked like a penis. Jobs said it wasn't true but then couldn't remove the image from his head. I forgot where AlI read that.

     

    Could maybe install a soccer stadium near the tip...

     

  • Reply 16 of 43
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,417member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).


    I understand and appreciate that view...

    Conversely, it's nice to conserve ground space...and I happen to feel a certain exaltation 

    in human determination when I see an imposing skyline-

    sort of the same way I feel while watching a space shuttle launch - "look at what the hell we can will into existence".

    So I'll enjoy that, periodically, so long as I'm also welcome, occasionally, to join you and the other Ewoks

    in reveling comfortably in the simpler, less imposing forms of cleverness we get up to.

  • Reply 17 of 43
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

     

     

    Could maybe install a soccer stadium near the tip...

     




    The world's largest baby is about to be delivered...

  • Reply 18 of 43
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,190member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

     

    Lovely post.

     

    I like the new campus. I hate skyscrapers. I remember Steve Jobs commenting on the new campus, saying how it was on a human scale because of the lowness. I wish the world as a whole would move away from high buildings and start building low, on a human scale. Nothing would please me more than to see every single skyscraper blown up to kingdom come (with no-one in them).


     

    Cause tall buildings serve no other function than being "tall", right? Feel free to suggest something more efficient and pragmatic than skyscrapers when dealing with dense spaces, and housing the same # of people. You know, since you want to blow them up and all. I'm assuming you have an alternate and viable option for the destroyed buildings. Doesn't take much to criticize (something you're good at). It's suggesting a superior option that actually takes some mental effort. 

  • Reply 19 of 43
    xixoxixo Posts: 427member
    slurpy wrote: »
    Cause tall buildings serve no other function than being "tall", right? Feel free to suggest something more efficient and pragmatic than skyscrapers when dealing with dense spaces, and housing the same # of people. You know, since you want to blow them up and all. I'm assuming you have an alternate and viable option for the destroyed buildings. 

    ^
    The sound of someone's ox being gored...
  • Reply 20 of 43
    smalmsmalm Posts: 657member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gremlin View Post

     

    Trilobal?

     


    trilobal = with three lobes

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