Apple releases Safari 8.0.6, 7.1.6, and 6.2.6 to fix WebKit vulnerabilities

Posted:
in macOS edited May 2015
Apple on Wednesday released Safari 8.0.6, a minor update of the Mac browser, concentrating primarily on fixing security holes discovered in the software.




The v8.0.6 release requires OS X Yosemite. Apple has simultaneously released Safari 7.1.6 for OS X Mavericks, and v6.2.6 for Mountain Lion, both of which share the same focus.

Release notes for the updates indicate that the vulnerabilities are all found in WebKit, the rendering engine underlying Safari. One would allow a malicious website to cause a crash or hijack a system, while another would let a site access filesystem contents. A third would let a site spoof the user interface.

Each of the Safari updates can be downloaded via the Updates tab at the Mac App Store.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    suddenly newtonsuddenly newton Posts: 13,670member
    A logical response. I've switched to Yosemite, but this is good news for those who haven't.
  • Reply 2 of 20
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 957member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post



    A logical response. I've switched to Yosemite, but this is good news for those who haven't.



    I honestly don't get the hate-on some people have against Yosemite, especially now that it's at 10.10.3, with Apple seemingly on-the-ball for any security threats that may crop up, it's a no-brainer upgrade!

  • Reply 3 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,644member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

     



    I honestly don't get the hate-on some people have against Yosemite, especially now that it's at 10.10.3, with Apple seemingly on-the-ball for any security threats that may crop up, it's a no-brainer upgrade!




    People generally hate change and resist it vociferously. Statistics show that on the Windows side the vast majority stick with the Windows version that shipped with their computer. They NEVER upgrade. People who are tech illiterate always come up with reasons they HAVE to stay on some older version of OS X and they sometimes pull those reasons out of their butts. 

  • Reply 4 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,644member

    I suspect there are more changes than the listed security updates. There almost always are because annoying little glitches often get fixed with these updates.

  • Reply 5 of 20
    thewhitefalconthewhitefalcon Posts: 4,453member
    magman1979 wrote: »

    I honestly don't get the hate-on some people have against Yosemite, especially now that it's at 10.10.3, with Apple seemingly on-the-ball for any security threats that may crop up, it's a no-brainer upgrade!

    It offends their "artistic vision" with its UI changes.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    Found out the hard way and after thinking my computer was broken that the Safari 8.0.6 update doesn't apply to those who are beta testing Yosemite 10.10.4. Hope Apple makes it available to us soon.
  • Reply 7 of 20
    techmanmiketechmanmike Posts: 147member
    magman1979 wrote: »

    I honestly don't get the hate-on some people have against Yosemite, especially now that it's at 10.10.3, with Apple seemingly on-the-ball for any security threats that may crop up, it's a no-brainer upgrade!

    Well for me personally I LOVE the design of Yosemite......but ultimately I hate the release because of all of the DNS issues resulting from discoveryd. A computer is really no good to me if it has connectivity issues. I think that's the boat a lot of people are in. I updated to 10.10.3 and it was just a complete no-go, so I restored from back-up back down to 10.10.2, which still has issues, but is a little more stable. This is on a late 2013 system.

    Apple IS fixing issues, but I don't feel like they're fixing the most important issue, which is connectivity.
  • Reply 8 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     



    People who are tech illiterate always come up with reasons they HAVE to stay on some older version of OS X and they sometimes pull those reasons out of their butts. 


     

    On one of our Macs we have to keep it at 10.7,  its used for a specific software that does not support anything higher.  There is a newer version out but our Mac would required replacing to run it.  The upgrade is not cost effective because the newer version doesn't add any value to us at all. The only limitation we have is having to export keynote documents to 09 if we need to run them from this machine.    

    We are tech literate and have a reason to stay on an older version of OS X. 

     

    Your requirements are not always everybody else's normal.

  • Reply 9 of 20
    mobiusmobius Posts: 373member
    I welcome the patch for Safari on Mavericks and ML in addition to Yosemite.

    However, given the fact that they aren't going to fix the Rootpipe vulnerability on pre 10.10.3 builds, it does seem a bit like sticking an elastoplast on a small flesh wound, while ignoring a deep festering gash in your torso.
  • Reply 10 of 20
    hagarhagar Posts: 81member
    Upgrading to Yosemite is not a no-brainer. I do like the new look of Yosemite (surprisingly, as I don't like several aspects of the ios7/8 look), but man... It has so many serious bugs in it. If you haven't encountered them, good for you. But that doesn't apply for everyone.
  • Reply 11 of 20
    MacProMacPro Posts: 16,945member
    lkrupp wrote: »

    People generally hate change and resist it vociferously. Statistics show that on the Windows side the vast majority stick with the Windows version that shipped with their computer. They NEVER upgrade. People who are tech illiterate always come up with reasons they HAVE to stay on some older version of OS X and they sometimes pull those reasons out of their butts. 

    I agree in general but Apple people have been different for the most part and I have been involved closely since 1978 with Apple users. That's what has always set us Apple folks apart from the Windoze brigade. We all tend to embrace change and update readily in my experience. The exceptions are obviously those with ancient Macs and simply can't. I have many legacy Macs running whatever was their EOL best OS. Perhaps the massive number of switchers will alter this as they bring their fears from Windows XP to OS X. I have come across a few such nervous nellies they even insist on running anti-virus software and fall for ever scam going.
  • Reply 12 of 20
    MacProMacPro Posts: 16,945member
    Well for me personally I LOVE the design of Yosemite......but ultimately I hate the release because of all of the DNS issues resulting from discoveryd. A computer is really no good to me if it has connectivity issues. I think that's the boat a lot of people are in. I updated to 10.10.3 and it was just a complete no-go, so I restored from back-up back down to 10.10.2, which still has issues, but is a little more stable. This is on a late 2013 system.

    Apple IS fixing issues, but I don't feel like they're fixing the most important issue, which is connectivity.

    What is weird is, I run the developer previews as soon as they are available, 10.10.3 fixed these issues that were there in 10.10.2 for me. I run my betas on a range of Macs from 2010 to 2014 machines.

    Are you sure you don't have something else going on with your DNS? When I moved to the early 10.10.3 I had to manually check all advanced settings and found some weird stuff such as TCP/IP router addresses and DNS servers with incorrect information. Once fixed all was well.

    I'd been running both WiFi and Ethernet on several machines and using various DNS servers with 10.10.2 in attempts to fix the bugs (like getting multiple versions of the computers' names on the LAN, ADR was impossible to use). So my initial issue with 10.10.3 was self inflicted as I went around in circles with 10.10.2. Never the less once I fixed in 10.10.3's first beta settings all was well again and has been ever since right through to the GM. Now I am on 10.10.4 all is still OK.
  • Reply 13 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 5,644member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    What is weird is, I run the developer previews as soon as they are available, 10.10.3 fixed these issues that were there in 10.10.2 for me. I run my betas on a range of Macs from 2010 to 2014 machines.

     

    Discoveryd has been elevated as the new Boogeyman of connectivity issues. If that is the case then why is your system stable? My home network is quite stable with, let’s see, two iPhones, an iPad, an iMac, a Samsung TV, a Samsung Blue-ray player, a Yamaha AVR all percolating along with no connectivity issues. I suspect the vast majority of users have no issues either. But some blogger tagged discoveryd as the source of all evil and since it was on the Internet it must be true, right? 

     

    My contention is that WiFi and networks are such complicated pieces of technology that interactions can be very tough to troubleshoot. Especially WiFi which can be easily disrupted by environmental conditions like proximity to other networks, channel selection, RF interference, you name it.

  • Reply 14 of 20
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,195member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

     



    I honestly don't get the hate-on some people have against Yosemite, especially now that it's at 10.10.3, with Apple seemingly on-the-ball for any security threats that may crop up, it's a no-brainer upgrade!




    Many of us were along for the ride as OS X was refined over 13 years, improving with each release, including its user interface. So to have Apple throw all of that away for something that is different (not better, and even a bit worse in some ways) is difficult to swallow.

     

    Pull down the Help menu and look at the color that they've chosen behind the Search field... is that even logical? It was much better when it was blue. And the new Spotlight... sure I've adapted to it, but it's annoying. I frequently use Spotlight for quick math operations, but now that it appears smack in the middle of the screen, with no way to move it, it quite often covers up the numbers that I'm trying to add. It wouldn't do that before when it off to the right.

     

    And still remaining are annoying issues like how the Get Info window appears in Finder, and the lack of some Finder features (eg. creating a folder in a subfolder when viewing a nested folder tree).

     

    Yosemite's UI changes were not an improvement, they were a distraction. And that creates frustration. Now you know. :)

  • Reply 15 of 20
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 957member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TechManMike View Post





    Well for me personally I LOVE the design of Yosemite......but ultimately I hate the release because of all of the DNS issues resulting from discoveryd. A computer is really no good to me if it has connectivity issues. I think that's the boat a lot of people are in. I updated to 10.10.3 and it was just a complete no-go, so I restored from back-up back down to 10.10.2, which still has issues, but is a little more stable. This is on a late 2013 system.



    Apple IS fixing issues, but I don't feel like they're fixing the most important issue, which is connectivity.

     

    I'm running 10.10.3 on a multitude of Mac's at work, and all my Mac's at home, and not one of them is experiencing connectivity issues... Only time I've encountered a connectivity issue is with Starbucks WiFi, which up in Canada is powered by Bell, and the service is truly craptastic. I also have yet to have a single person bring me their Yosemite Mac for any sort of connectivity issues. And out of the how many millions of Mac's now running it, if only a few hundred, or even a few thousand people are complaining, then this would barely even be a blip on Apple's radar, and could most likely be attributed to people dicking around with the OS.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

     



    Many of us were along for the ride as OS X was refined over 13 years, improving with each release, including its user interface. So to have Apple throw all of that away for something that is different (not better, and even a bit worse in some ways) is difficult to swallow.

     

    Pull down the Help menu and look at the color that they've chosen behind the Search field... is that even logical? It was much better when it was blue. And the new Spotlight... sure I've adapted to it, but it's annoying. I frequently use Spotlight for quick math operations, but now that it appears smack in the middle of the screen, with no way to move it, it quite often covers up the numbers that I'm trying to add. It wouldn't do that before when it off to the right.

     

    And still remaining are annoying issues like how the Get Info window appears in Finder, and the lack of some Finder features (eg. creating a folder in a subfolder when viewing a nested folder tree).

     

    Yosemite's UI changes were not an improvement, they were a distraction. And that creates frustration. Now you know. :)


     

    Wow, a regurgitated anti-iOS 7 argument against Yosemite... Get over it, it's getting tired and boring (referring to your comment and not OS X). Yosemite is one of the best looking and functioning versions of OS X in quite some time, and I find it a breath of fresh air. Out of all the people at work who've upgraded to it, not ONE complaint about the look of the revised UI, not ONE. And I help manage a fleet of more than 200 Mac's. The majority feedback I hear is nothing but positives. People like you just cannot stand even the slightest bit of change.

  • Reply 16 of 20
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TechManMike View Post





    Well for me personally I LOVE the design of Yosemite......but ultimately I hate the release because of all of the DNS issues resulting from discoveryd. 

     

    The problem could be something other than Yosemite. Do you have an older Mac, ?TV or Airport Express on your network? Some older devices use incompatible versions of discoveryd that can corrupt Bonjour dns cache. Try turning off those devices then reboot your Yosemite machine. Then turn on the wifi. That should establish a clean cache. Then when you turn on the older devices, they will use the current clean cache. Kind of a hassle when you come and go because when you get back the Bonjour cache may be poisoned again.

  • Reply 17 of 20
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,195member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

     


    Wow, a regurgitated anti-iOS 7 argument against Yosemite... Get over it, it's getting tired and boring (referring to your comment and not OS X). Yosemite is one of the best looking and functioning versions of OS X in quite some time, and I find it a breath of fresh air. Out of all the people at work who've upgraded to it, not ONE complaint about the look of the revised UI, not ONE. And I help manage a fleet of more than 200 Mac's. The majority feedback I hear is nothing but positives. People like you just cannot stand even the slightest bit of change.

     

    Well, you need to realize, as I do, that this is about personal taste. I preferred buttons feeling like buttons. I preferred the flowing "water-like" effects that were unique to OS X. I preferred the former colour scheme. Is Yosemite bad? No. Did the visual changes make it better? No. See the difference? I use Yosemite every day, and I've grown accustomed to it, but I'm not blind to what came before it, and how years of refinement were tossed out overnight. I find your response to be distasteful, rude and uncalled for.

     

    The facts are evident. Apple was excited about the new look because they want parity across their platforms. Nothing wrong with that. But while they were distracted by the UI changes, problems were introduced into the operating system that could've actually been avoided had their priorities been different. That's my point, and I think it's perfectly valid.

  • Reply 18 of 20
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 957member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

     

     

    Well, you need to realize, as I do, that this is about personal taste. I preferred buttons feeling like buttons. I preferred the flowing "water-like" effects that were unique to OS X. I preferred the former colour scheme. Is Yosemite bad? No. Did the visual changes make it better? No. See the difference? I use Yosemite every day, and I've grown accustomed to it, but I'm not blind to what came before it, and how years of refinement were tossed out overnight. I find your response to be distasteful, rude and uncalled for.

     

    The facts are evident. Apple was excited about the new look because they want parity across their platforms. Nothing wrong with that. But while they were distracted by the UI changes, problems were introduced into the operating system that could've actually been avoided had their priorities been different. That's my point, and I think it's perfectly valid.




    You think that the bugs experienced in Yosemite were due to the fact Apple was too focused on the UI changes? OK, perhaps you neglected to watch the WWDC Keynote where Yosemite was introduced, and showcased an AVALANCHE of new features in technologies, alongside the improved UI? Yosemite, along with iOS 8, was MUCH more an under-the-hood and feature addition / enhancement release than it was about the UI. The UI, quite honestly, was the icing on the cake. The star of this release were the technological additions, refinements, and improvements. Whenever such a massive amount of additions is made to any software, there are bound to be bugs. Thankfully, Apple made the very smart decision of making the Yosemite Beta available to the public, of which I was a tester, and I reported a TON of bugs, and with each Beta release, found them to be fixed.

     

    After almost a decade of skeuomorphisims in both OS X and iOS, I found the Yosemite and iOS 7/8 interfaces to be much more refined and polished, as does the majority of the user base. I repeat my statement, in that your comment is that of someone who abhors change.

  • Reply 19 of 20
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,195member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

     



    You think that the bugs experienced in Yosemite were due to the fact Apple was too focused on the UI changes? OK, perhaps you neglected to watch the WWDC Keynote where Yosemite was introduced, and showcased an AVALANCHE of new features in technologies, alongside the improved UI? Yosemite, along with iOS 8, was MUCH more an under-the-hood and feature addition / enhancement release than it was about the UI. The UI, quite honestly, was the icing on the cake. The star of this release were the technological additions, refinements, and improvements. Whenever such a massive amount of additions is made to any software, there are bound to be bugs. Thankfully, Apple made the very smart decision of making the Yosemite Beta available to the public, of which I was a tester, and I reported a TON of bugs, and with each Beta release, found them to be fixed.

     

    After almost a decade of skeuomorphisims in both OS X and iOS, I found the Yosemite and iOS 7/8 interfaces to be much more refined and polished, as does the majority of the user base. I repeat my statement, in that your comment is that of someone who abhors change.




    As you can imagine, things are not always as simple as they appear to be. Of course the bugs are not as result of the UI changes. I'm a software developer myself. Over the past twelve years, I've built up a software platform that is at the core of my business, and powers the websites and business databases for all of my clients. It's an extremely advanced piece of tech. Every month, I continue to tweak things, fix bugs, add features, and then fix more bugs. I'm well aware of how software development works, which also gives me insight into how off-track _some_ of Apple's decisions lately have been. I peg that being a result of new blood. Newer, younger developers that see things differently, and no, I don't need to agree with them. I won't just lay over and accept how things are. I will voice my opinion in hopes of improving things. I, too, participated in the Public Beta program and submitted my own bug reports. I repeat my statement, in that I do not favour Yosemite's UI over past versions, and certain areas of OS X _do_ get neglected because developers are focused on some areas that are simply change for change sake.

     

    And to stay on topic with this thread.... Safari is my preferred browser, even if it's been buggy as hell lately. Glad to see they are continuing to fix things. :)

  • Reply 20 of 20
    techmanmiketechmanmike Posts: 147member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

     

     

    I'm running 10.10.3 on a multitude of Mac's at work, and all my Mac's at home, and not one of them is experiencing connectivity issues... Only time I've encountered a connectivity issue is with Starbucks WiFi, which up in Canada is powered by Bell, and the service is truly craptastic. I also have yet to have a single person bring me their Yosemite Mac for any sort of connectivity issues. And out of the how many millions of Mac's now running it, if only a few hundred, or even a few thousand people are complaining, then this would barely even be a blip on Apple's radar, and could most likely be attributed to people dicking around with the OS.

     

     


     

    Well that's great that neither you nor anyone in your inner circle are having issues, but frankly that doesn't mean $h!t to me. My issues were VERY real when I was on 10.10.3, and I have console logs full of errors messages like these regarding Discoveryd and DNS to prove it: 

     

    Quote:

    5/7/15 5:08:15.662 PM discoveryd[49]: Basic DNSResolver UDNS Send(): UDP Sendto() failed to DNSNameServer 2601:8:b700:8fe:7ed1:c3ff:fec7:9600 Port 53 errno 22, fd 69, ErrLogCount 7 ResolverIntf:4


     

     

    In addition I have logs from 10.10.2 that still shows that the issue is present, it's just not as bad as 10.10.3. I haven't done anything with the OS at all, so why that's the assumption is beyond me. Typical attitude to deflect an issue away from Apple and on to the user. I love Apple just as much as the next guy, but I'm not the only person who's not pleased with their quality control as of late. In addition, both Marco Arment and Craig Hockenberry posted about the issues with Discoveryd just a day or two ago, and Craig specifically detailed his Radars that he sent to Apple during the Beta phase, that went unanswered and unfixed. These issues were not present before, and they are present now, under no doing of my own.

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