For consumers, Apple's CarPlay takes backseat to practical in-car technology

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 2015
A study published on Tuesday shows consumers are largely indifferent to high profile automotive infotainment initiatives from Apple and Google, instead exhibiting considerably more interest in practical car technology like blind spot detection and lumbar seat adjustment.




With advanced operating systems and hardware quickly bridging the gap between car and smartphone, in-car infotainment solutions -- not to mention user data monetization -- is poised to be a huge money maker for auto manufacturers and tech firms alike. Despite untold amounts of capital infusions into projects like CarPlay and Android Auto, however, consumers are not yet persuaded that connected technology enriches the driving experience, according to the J.D. Power 2015 Driver Interactive Vehicle Experience Report, as conveyed by Fortune.

The study, which was conducted between April and June 2015, asked more than 4,200 new car owners and lessees about their experience with 33 technology features during the first 90 days of ownership. As might be expected when integrating new technology into an ever-evolving systems platform, at least 20 percent of respondents didn't use 16 of the measured features. Specifically, the number of drivers who "never use" in-vehicle concierge stood at 43 percent, mobile routers at 38 percent, automatic parking systems at 35 percent, head-up display at 33 percent and built-in apps at 32 percent.

More pointedly, a respective 37 percent and 38 percent of respondents said they did not want CarPlay and Android Auto in their car, landing the two infotainment systems on an inauspicious list of most unwanted vehicle technologies. Leading the pack of unwelcome tech was rear-seat entertainment with 58 percent of those polled saying they didn't want it, while massaging seats came in second followed by in-vehicle concierge and automatic parking.

Interestingly, consumers are obliged to have some sort of smartphone compatibility in their next vehicle, as 84 percent said they wanted a "phone pairing system." Such technology, which already comes standard on many basic in-car entertainment systems, made it on the top-five list of most-wanted tech behind blind spot warning and detection, fuel economy indicator and seat lumbar adjustment.

First announced in March 2014 as an evolution of "iOS in the Car," Apple's CarPlay has seen wide industry interest culminating in pledged support from all major manufacturers. Most recently Honda and Volkswagen announced upcoming compatibility in select 2016 models.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 47
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,581member

    How would people know whether or not they want something when they've never seen it? Ridiculous.

  • Reply 2 of 47
    nuttannuttan Posts: 21member
    I had hoped, that by now, there would be a way to track
    ones head movements.
    Turning ones head while driving only slightly to the right or left, activating side view mirrors to adjust accordingly. Couple other things I'm working on :-)
  • Reply 3 of 47
    J D Powers is like the IDC of the auto industry.

    I always take their $1 bill, drop it off at some charity somewhere, and never bother to answer a single, bloated, poorly-worded questionnaire of theirs, ever.
  • Reply 4 of 47
    milkmagemilkmage Posts: 152member
    doesn't surprise me at all.

    When the kids getting their licenses this year start buying their first new cars, this will change.

    It's a generation thing.

    Hell, I still do most of my browsing on a desktop/laptop.

    Kids these days never even used a browser.
  • Reply 5 of 47
    milkmagemilkmage Posts: 152member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

    How would people know whether or not they want something when they've never seen it? Ridiculous.


     

    what are you talking about? they surveyed new car owners and asked which gizmos they used in the first 90 days.

     

    "asked more than 4,200 new car owners and lessees about their experience with 33 technology features during the first 90 days of ownership."

     

    what do you mean "they've never seen it" - it's there. in their new car, in the garage.

  • Reply 6 of 47
    nuttan wrote: »
    I had hoped, that by now, there would be a way to track
    ones head movements.
    Turning ones head while driving only slightly to the right or left, activating side view mirrors to adjust accordingly. Couple other things I'm working on :-)

    The technology isn't the issue. Longevity of the mirror motors is. No one wants to replace their mirrors multiple times in a year.
    milkmage wrote: »
    doesn't surprise me at all.

    When the kids getting their licenses this year start buying their first new cars, this will change.

    It's a generation thing.

    Hell, I still do most of my browsing on a desktop/laptop.

    Kids these days never even used a browser.

    Yes, clearly mobile OS's don't have browsers.

    Are you serious? Also, the "kids these days" are in horrendous levels of debt; they're not buying cars.
  • Reply 7 of 47

    I'm more interested in wheels and windshields 

  • Reply 8 of 47
    Riiiiiight...

    Like listening to music isn't practical...

    And lumbar support has been around forever.

    But actually lets take that as an example of what Apples CarPlay actually brings into view.

    It's not about something new. It's about something better.

    Lumbar support has been around s while. Whether your cars junky built in adjustments or some doodad you buy from best buy.

    But nyou want great lumbar support. Not just something that's there.

    Hence CarPlay. The ability to be entertained and informed in the vehicle is not a new thing. However Apple has brought greatness to it.

    Boom. Done. Simple.

    It's not a matter of no one caring because they want blind spot detection. It's a matter of safety vs convenience.

    And yes everyone who's used current infotainment systems will think CarPlay is a Godsend once they use it.
  • Reply 9 of 47
    danielswdanielsw Posts: 905member

    SpamSandwich: "How would people know whether or not they want something when they've never seen it? Ridiculous."

     



    Agreed. People in general are even more stupid than these premature surveys.

     

    I was at a BMW dealer looking at various models, when the subject of adaptive cruise control came up. The veteran salesman told me that most of his customers don't use cruise control! Not too surprising, but a rather telling indictment of the mentality of the average Joe.

     

    We have a 2014 Honda CR-V and love it. We didn't get the nav package because the car's Bluetooth paired easily with our iPhones, and Siri's driving directions have proven quite adequate.

     

    I was told at our Honda dealership that more models will be coming out with Apple Car Play, so we'll probably trade up when that happens.

  • Reply 10 of 47
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by milkmage View Post



    doesn't surprise me at all.



    When the kids getting their licenses this year start buying their first new cars, this will change.



    It's a generation thing.



    Hell, I still do most of my browsing on a desktop/laptop.



    Kids these days never even used a browser.



    What's a browser?

    There's just apps.

  • Reply 11 of 47
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,224member
    Before iPhone, people wanted bigger batteries and memory cards. This is why Apple doesn't use focus groups to decide what technology to develop.
  • Reply 12 of 47
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,172member
    Meh, I doubt I'll ever own a car made after 1999. Who knows, I might find an aftermarket solution with car play, but I doubt there will be anything on the market by the time I'm looking.
  • Reply 13 of 47
    prolineproline Posts: 187member
    milkmage wrote: »
    what are you talking about? they surveyed new car owners and asked which gizmos they used in the first 90 days.

    "asked more than 4,200 new car owners and lessees about their experience with 33 technology features during the first 90 days of ownership."

    what do you mean "they've never seen it" - it's there. in their new car, in the garage.
    You're out of line, please educate yourself. CarPlay is presently only available on a couple high end vehicles and these weren't the people they were polling. In April, virtually no cars had shipped with CarPlay. There will be more support coming in 2016 models through the fall. Let's be clear though- this poll was primarily of people who've never seen or used CarPlay and have no idea if they want it or not.
  • Reply 14 of 47

    There's a bus stop near my home advertising the new Ford Ranger Pickup. The tag line is "Stay connected with WiFi Hot Spot".

    It's a fricken' car for God's sake. Are buyers not more concerned with performance, gas mileage, towing capacity, resale value etc?

    Keep your hands and eyes off the tech and concentrate on the road, Morons.

  • Reply 15 of 47
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,581member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by milkmage View Post

     

     

    what are you talking about? they surveyed new car owners and asked which gizmos they used in the first 90 days.

     

    "asked more than 4,200 new car owners and lessees about their experience with 33 technology features during the first 90 days of ownership."

     

    what do you mean "they've never seen it" - it's there. in their new car, in the garage.




    Are you sure they were aware of it? How do you know?

  • Reply 16 of 47
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post

     

    I was at a BMW dealer looking at various models, when the subject of adaptive cruise control came up. The veteran salesman told me that most of his customers don't use cruise control! Not too surprising, but a rather telling indictment of the mentality of the average Joe.


     

    Your sample was flawed. As a BMW driver, you're expected to pass everybody else on the road recklessly.

  • Reply 17 of 47
    I recently bought a new 2015 Toyota with the Premium Navigation/Audio system and I must say that for the$2000 plus extra that it cost to have that option, it totally and completely sucks!!! Toyota's Entune system cry's for help to be replaced by CarPlay, It's crashes constantly and the navigation is on a micro SD card that is much slower than the old DVD navigation system was, sometimes it takes a very long time to route accurate directions. I was told by my dealer that the system has a major issue the the iPhone but after using it and trying different Toyota system preferences setting, including not using it with the iPhone even turned on that it still crashes, it get's hung up and freezes daily. I won't even get into how bad the Voice recognition is. I gave up on it, Siri is light years ahead of the system Toyota is putting in it's new cars!
  • Reply 18 of 47
    I have installed the Alpine iLX-007 in my 2004 Pajero (Montero in US, not Montero Sport)

    I will not drive a car I regularly own again without installing a CarPlay system. It's that good.

    I used to have a high end Sony system with hard drive and media playback, multi screen support etc. it was terrible (ran on Android)

    I now have a capacitive touch screen that predicts where I'm driving and pops up "alternative route available, save 4 minutes" in congested situations. Siri will read and accept dictation of messages entirely hands free. When driving away from work a group fenced reminder "Fill up gas" pops up on the screen.
  • Reply 19 of 47
    Not for me, this is the top of my list for my next vehicle . In my sisters gl is has a safety sensor and it always seems to go after you see the obstacle I don't really trust those systems over my driving .
  • Reply 20 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post

     

     Are buyers not more concerned with performance, gas mileage, towing capacity, resale value etc?


     

    For a given vehicle class, you'll find these attributes are nearly identical over competing brands. Car companies are trying to make technology a relatively inexpensive differentiator.

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