Parrot unveils new Disco winged drone with 50mph top speed, iOS connectivity

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2016
Do-everything electronics maker Parrot on Tuesday unveiled its new Disco drone, eschewing the quadcopter design for a new winged style that adds advanced autopilot systems and a significantly higher top speed.




The Disco features a single, powerful propeller on the rear and a 1080p camera mounted to its nose. Launching the drone is as simple as turning it on and throwing it in the air -- Parrot says it will automatically begin to fly itself as soon as the user lets go.

Landing is equally hands-off, with ground sensors that...sense the ground to help the drone land itself.



The company also notes that piloting the Disco requires no prior experience thanks to a new assisted autopilot mode, which in effect translates the user's inputs into safe movements. A "loiter" mode will set the Disco in a continuous circular pattern around a specific point.

Like other Parrot devices, the Disco will connect to the company's official iOS app, allowing iPhone or iPad users to see a live stream of their recording over Wi-Fi. The Parrot Disco will also work with the company's SkyController, which includes an iPad mount and physical input buttons.

Parrot intends to launch the Disco later this year, though there is no indication as to exactly where "later" falls on the calendar. Pricing information is similarly unavailable.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 394member
    Nice. But how many of these are likely to get shot down?
  • Reply 2 of 12
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,184member
    JinTech said:
    Nice. But how many of these are likely to get shot down?
    Probably not many unless you want to get arrested. 
  • Reply 3 of 12
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 1,007member
    Since they're wifi, the range must be pretty poor compared to standard RC stuff. At the supposed 50mph top speed it'd be out of range in seconds.
  • Reply 4 of 12
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,459member
    They used to sell a 3rd party aircraft the launched the same way and looked quite similar. It was used for 3d mapping of terrain and ran on autopilot once a flight path was selected.  Over 10K for the setup as well.

    Looks like it would be another fun product to play with especially if they keep it in the price range of the Bebops.
  • Reply 5 of 12

    After owning Parrot's Asteroid car receiver I will never buy anything they make again. It took 45 seconds to boot, it crashed constantly, there were apps for it that were advertised but didn't exist, and the biggest kick in the stomach was for months they assured users that they were fixing the bugs - but not the bugs people were complaining about - the easy ones to fix. I held out for months on promises the serious bugs would be fixed. Eventually they stopped answering complaints in their forums.

    There was a card in the box that it shipped in that said something like, "Do not return to the store! Call ***-***-****". That should have been my warning right there. After 6 months, I went back to Fry's Electronics and told the customer service person this, "I have been shopping here for 20 years and this is the worst POS I have bought. You are going to take this back or I'm never shopping here again." They took it back.

    If you ever receive a notice in the box that says to do not return it to the store, return it immediately. You should know that the company is based in England, so your return is going to be a nightmare otherwise.

    That was in 2012. I went to Crutchfield to see what was new and not surprised to find the reviews with almost same problems with the current generation of products.

  • Reply 6 of 12
    ...insurance rates for such a projectile seems a valid question...
  • Reply 7 of 12
    bdkennedy said:

    If you ever receive a notice in the box that says to do not return it to the store, return it immediately. You should know that the company is based in England, so your return is going to be a nightmare otherwise.

    From Parrot's website: "Parrot, headquartered in Paris, currently employs over 900 people worldwide and generates the majority of its revenues outside of France." Just for the record ....
  • Reply 8 of 12
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,184member
    elijahg said:
    Since they're wifi, the range must be pretty poor compared to standard RC stuff. At the supposed 50mph top speed it'd be out of range in seconds.
    Wifi is for live video, not flying. If you watched the video, you would see you can use an RC controller too. 
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 9 of 12
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,285member
    Why are drones all the rage lately and why are they constantly news on this site?
  • Reply 10 of 12
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    Because they're fun?
  • Reply 11 of 12
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,412member
    And these will be declared illegal in 3...2...1...
  • Reply 12 of 12
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,483member
    IMO, any such device needs to be completely modular, both so one can easily repair it when it crashes and because sensor technology advances so rapidly, you need to be able to either update the sensor or update the camera.  1080p is already really kind of obsolete. 

    Also, with its large size and 50mph top-speed, it seems to me this one is particularly dangerous to both other aircraft and people on the ground, should it crash.    Why would anyone need 50mph?   That seems too fast for most video uses and even if it's not, one can speed video up post-production.

    But in spite of all the hype about such drones and I see some lower-end ones sold in my (still-open) local Radio Shack, I have never seen anyone using one in real life outside of a trade show, not even in my very large local park, which still features a special fenced-in area for wire controlled airplanes and also has lots of hobbyists using RC controlled model cars.  I haven't seen anyone using them in Central or Prospect Parks (in NYC) either (not that I'm there all the time). 

    I can see uses for shooting wedding parties, action shots, etc., although I suspect that once these things become really popular with photographers and videographers, the shots might start to look passé because everyone will do the same shots: swooping in on the bride and groom, etc.   Would also be great for certain travel photography, but what happens when there's 50 of them (or more) flying over the same section of the Grand Canyon, Yosemite or the Great Wall of China  - they'll wind up getting banned in all these places. 
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