Apple bucks downward PC market spiral, was lone manufacturer to see growth in 2015

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2016
The latest statistics from market research firm Gartner show Apple as the lone top-five PC vendor that grew worldwide shipments from 2014, bucking an negative market trend that saw shipments decline for the fourth consecutive year.


Units in thousands. | Source: Gartner


Apple took the No. 5 spot for 2015, shipping 20.7 million Macs for a 7.2 percent share of the market, up 5.8 percent from its performance in 2014. As it did for the quarter, Apple ousted Acer on the year as the Taiwanese vendor suffered a 15.3 percent decline.

Lenovo was in the top spot for 2015 with 57.1 million units shipped, good for a 19.8 percent marketshare. The company's growth contracted 3.1 percent, however, in line with overall industry headwinds.

HP placed second with 52.6 million PC shipments for 18.2 percent of the market, down 4.4 percent on the year. Dell and Asus rounded out the top five with 39.2 million and 21.2 million units shipped, taking a respective 13.6 percent and 7.3 percent slice of the pie. Dell was down 3.3 percent in 2015, while Asus contracted 6.5 percent.

"In 2015, local currency devaluation also played a key role in the market conditions," said Kitagawa. "EMEA, Latin America and Japan faced a major impact from the devaluation, showing double-digit declines in 2015. In contrast, the U.S. and Asia/Pacific experienced minor declines of almost flat to low single-digit declines as the currency issue did not affect these regions."


Units in thousands.


For the final calendar quarter of 2015, Gartner estimates Apple to have shipped 5.7 million Macs for a 7.5 percent share of the worldwide market, up 2.8 percent from the fourth quarter of 2014. With the performance, Apple replaced Acer for fifth place.

Lenovo maintained its worldwide lead with 15.4 million units shipped during the fourth quarter to retain 20.3 percent of the worldwide market, down 4.2 percent year-over-year. HP shipped 14.2 million PCs for an 18.8 percent marketshare, down 8.1 percent from last year. Dell and Asus followed with 10.2 million and 6 million unit shipments, down 5.1 percent and 3.2 percent, respectively. Acer rounded out the top-six with 5.3 million unit shipments for a 7 percent share of the market, a huge 11.2 percent contraction year-over-year.

"The fourth quarter of 2015 marked the fifth consecutive quarter of worldwide PC shipment decline," said Mikako Kitagawa, principal analyst at Gartner. "Holiday sales did not boost the overall PC shipments, hinting at changes to consumers' PC purchase behavior.

In the US, Apple placed third in quarter four with 2.2 million shipments and 12.8 percent of the market, up 6.5 percent year over year. Fourth-place Lenovo shipped 2.1 million PCs and exhibited the highest growth rate of 21.1 percent. US market leaders HP and Dell shipped 4.6 million and 4.1 million units for a respective 27.1 percent and 24.5 percent of the market. HP's quarterly performance declined 8.4 percent year over year, while Dell dipped 1.5 percent.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,060member
    But only Apple is Doomed™. Remember it. Memorize it. Repeat it. Apple is Doomed™
    magman1979macky the mackyjbdragon
  • Reply 2 of 18
    lkrupp said:
    But only Apple is Doomed™. Remember it. Memorize it. Repeat it. Apple is Doomed™
    Also: "I love my Surface Pro 3!!!!"
    awilliams87anton zuykovjbdragon
  • Reply 3 of 18
    Good to mention Gartner includes tablets in these numbers, whereas IDC doesn't. WSJ has IDC's numbers: http://www.wsj.com/articles/pc-sales-drop-to-historic-lows-1452634605 If you exclude tablets, then Asus has a small increase YoY, but Apple rules them all.
    macky the macky
  • Reply 4 of 18
    I don't comment on stats like this often because they fluctuate, but the first table in this article shows an impressively stark contrast between Apple and the PC makers.

    I'm a "data point of one" in these stats: after 25 years of buying PCs for home use, I finally returned to my original vendor and bought a MacBook Pro (... to learn app development). On that note, thank you Stanford University for making the Swift programming course available for free on iTunes U. Very helpful.
  • Reply 5 of 18
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 907member
    These are just more reasons for Apple stock to go down.
    jbdragon
  • Reply 6 of 18
    linkman said:
    These are just more reasons for Apple stock to go down.
    No reason is necessary.
  • Reply 7 of 18
    Huge contractions in the PC market. Apple's increased sales come nowhere near making up for the losses of the other vendors. It means that Intel is losing some serious chip sales and will be facing major profit losses. 

    I will say it again, x86 is a dying platform. It is just a matter of time. It will be following in the footsteps of the PowerPC and 68k platforms. And even before that, the 6502 platform. 

    I was sad to see the demise of the PPC as PA Semi was making some serious advancements on that platform. No matter as Apple purchased the company and they are now making some serious advancements on the A series CPUs. It has only taken a decade for a competitor to catch up in performance to x86 whereas the PPC was already there a decade ago. IBM just couldn't see it at the time. Intel couldn't either. Hence Otellini's rejection of Jobs' overture to build the iPhone CPU. 

    I for one won't be saddened to see the end of x86. Intel won't be able to bully Apple like they did to AMD either. 

    And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. 

    With TSMC's profits intact, they will continue to invest in advanced manufacturing processes. With Intel's loss of profits, they will not. It is just a matter of time now before Apple is forced to release a laptop and/or desktop based on an A series CPU or seriously upgrade the capabilities of iOS. 

    Whatever the case, x86 is now on borrowed time. 
    latifbp
  • Reply 8 of 18
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,919member
    acgmph said:
    Good to mention Gartner includes tablets in these numbers, whereas IDC doesn't. WSJ has IDC's numbers: http://www.wsj.com/articles/pc-sales-drop-to-historic-lows-1452634605 If you exclude tablets, then Asus has a small increase YoY, but Apple rules them all.
    Where did you read that? It keeps talking about Mac sales, makes no mention of a combined Mac & iPad sales.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    metrixmetrix Posts: 250member
    Huge contractions in the PC market. Apple's increased sales come nowhere near making up for the losses of the other vendors. It means that Intel is losing some serious chip sales and will be facing major profit losses. 

    I will say it again, x86 is a dying platform. It is just a matter of time. It will be following in the footsteps of the PowerPC and 68k platforms. And even before that, the 6502 platform. 

    I was sad to see the demise of the PPC as PA Semi was making some serious advancements on that platform. No matter as Apple purchased the company and they are now making some serious advancements on the A series CPUs. It has only taken a decade for a competitor to catch up in performance to x86 whereas the PPC was already there a decade ago. IBM just couldn't see it at the time. Intel couldn't either. Hence Otellini's rejection of Jobs' overture to build the iPhone CPU. 

    I for one won't be saddened to see the end of x86. Intel won't be able to bully Apple like they did to AMD either. 

    And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. 

    With TSMC's profits intact, they will continue to invest in advanced manufacturing processes. With Intel's loss of profits, they will not. It is just a matter of time now before Apple is forced to release a laptop and/or desktop based on an A series CPU or seriously upgrade the capabilities of iOS. 

    Whatever the case, x86 is now on borrowed time. 
    I agree and also saw it coming. In a short time, 2-3 years, Apples AX processor will provide enough processing power to replace Intel's i3 and eventually i5 and Apps will become more and more powerful.
  • Reply 10 of 18
    metrix said:
    Huge contractions in the PC market. Apple's increased sales come nowhere near making up for the losses of the other vendors. It means that Intel is losing some serious chip sales and will be facing major profit losses. 

    I will say it again, x86 is a dying platform. It is just a matter of time. It will be following in the footsteps of the PowerPC and 68k platforms. And even before that, the 6502 platform. 

    I was sad to see the demise of the PPC as PA Semi was making some serious advancements on that platform. No matter as Apple purchased the company and they are now making some serious advancements on the A series CPUs. It has only taken a decade for a competitor to catch up in performance to x86 whereas the PPC was already there a decade ago. IBM just couldn't see it at the time. Intel couldn't either. Hence Otellini's rejection of Jobs' overture to build the iPhone CPU. 

    I for one won't be saddened to see the end of x86. Intel won't be able to bully Apple like they did to AMD either. 

    And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. 

    With TSMC's profits intact, they will continue to invest in advanced manufacturing processes. With Intel's loss of profits, they will not. It is just a matter of time now before Apple is forced to release a laptop and/or desktop based on an A series CPU or seriously upgrade the capabilities of iOS. 

    Whatever the case, x86 is now on borrowed time. 
    I agree and also saw it coming. In a short time, 2-3 years, Apples AX processor will provide enough processing power to replace Intel's i3 and eventually i5 and Apps will become more and more powerful.
    This may be treading on fantasy land, but imagine a situation where the Mac marketshare in PCs is similar to the iPhone marketshare in smart phones. The Mac would then become the most important slice of the pie in revenues!
  • Reply 11 of 18
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,919member
    Huge contractions in the PC market. Apple's increased sales come nowhere near making up for the losses of the other vendors. It means that Intel is losing some serious chip sales and will be facing major profit losses. 

    I will say it again, x86 is a dying platform. It is just a matter of time. It will be following in the footsteps of the PowerPC and 68k platforms. And even before that, the 6502 platform. 

    I was sad to see the demise of the PPC as PA Semi was making some serious advancements on that platform. No matter as Apple purchased the company and they are now making some serious advancements on the A series CPUs. It has only taken a decade for a competitor to catch up in performance to x86 whereas the PPC was already there a decade ago. IBM just couldn't see it at the time. Intel couldn't either. Hence Otellini's rejection of Jobs' overture to build the iPhone CPU. 

    I for one won't be saddened to see the end of x86. Intel won't be able to bully Apple like they did to AMD either. 

    And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. 

    With TSMC's profits intact, they will continue to invest in advanced manufacturing processes. With Intel's loss of profits, they will not. It is just a matter of time now before Apple is forced to release a laptop and/or desktop based on an A series CPU or seriously upgrade the capabilities of iOS. 

    Whatever the case, x86 is now on borrowed time. 
    "And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. "

    Or they could eventually buy Intel and design their own CPU's / SoC's for their own devices.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    metrix said:
    I agree and also saw it coming. In a short time, 2-3 years, Apples AX processor will provide enough processing power to replace Intel's i3 and eventually i5 and Apps will become more and more powerful.
    This may be treading on fantasy land, but imagine a situation where the Mac marketshare in PCs is similar to the iPhone marketshare in smart phones. The Mac would then become the most important slice of the pie in revenues!
    I would like the Mac to have a double-digit marketshare. Think of all the guys whose first Apple product is an iPhone.......I am pretty sure they will consider buying a Mac more nowadays than the early iPod Adopter 10 years ago.
  • Reply 13 of 18
    Certainly positive news, albeit the general impression on the Mac line is that of utter stagnation, both in terms of industrial design and hardware. The chassis's are indistinguishable since 2012 and the internals are a compromise at best. The Cinema Display has faded into irrelevance. Even the 5K iMac, the latest and greatest desktop variant (since the Mac Pro is stuck in time in 2013) bifurcates the available options between a €2000 Facebook machine and a €5000 "pro" configuration that is merely workable. I work alongside several other video/graphic developers designers and coders, all of whom use Macs (really, our office is like a mini Apple Store), and they echo the same concerns. Apple, please heed your professional users!
  • Reply 14 of 18
    Someone in my Twitter feed wondered if Apple would combine Mac and iPad for financial reporting? Why would they do that? The Mac is a bright spot in their financials why saddle it with iPad?
  • Reply 15 of 18
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Certainly positive news, albeit the general impression on the Mac line is that of utter stagnation, both in terms of industrial design and hardware. The chassis's are indistinguishable since 2012 and the internals are a compromise at best. The Cinema Display has faded into irrelevance. Even the 5K iMac, the latest and greatest desktop variant (since the Mac Pro is stuck in time in 2013) bifurcates the available options between a €2000 Facebook machine and a €5000 "pro" configuration that is merely workable. I work alongside several other video/graphic developers designers and coders, all of whom use Macs (really, our office is like a mini Apple Store), and they echo the same concerns. Apple, please heed your professional users!
    Intel is 100% responsible for the stagnation because I'm sure Apple was waiting for their much delayed chips to change things.

  • Reply 16 of 18
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,527member
    "And if Microsoft cannot successfully negotiate a transition of Windows over to Acorn Risc Machine CPUs, they will go the way of Commodore and Atari. "

    Or they could eventually buy Intel and design their own CPU's / SoC's for their own devices.
    Lots of risk in that position.  Unless it is a number of years in future where Intel price is down significantly, it would be a HUGE purchase for MS.  Couple that with the fact that MS makes little hardware, it would seem to be a poor road to take.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    metrix said:
    I agree and also saw it coming. In a short time, 2-3 years, Apples AX processor will provide enough processing power to replace Intel's i3 and eventually i5 and Apps will become more and more powerful.
    This may be treading on fantasy land, but imagine a situation where the Mac marketshare in PCs is similar to the iPhone marketshare in smart phones. The Mac would then become the most important slice of the pie in revenues!
    it already is in terms of profit -- apple makes most of the profit in the PC space with its Mac line.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    This may be treading on fantasy land, but imagine a situation where the Mac marketshare in PCs is similar to the iPhone marketshare in smart phones. The Mac would then become the most important slice of the pie in revenues!
    it already is in terms of profit -- apple makes most of the profit in the PC space with its Mac line.
    Yes, they are taking in all the profits. I was just fantasising about the market share. If they hit an iPhone-like marketshare, like about 40% or so, the revenues would be off the charts.

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