Office 2016 for Mac updates with fullscreen Outlook, other new features

Posted:
in Mac Software
Microsoft on Wednesday updated Office 2016 for Mac, adding not just bugfixes but new features for all of the apps in the suite, such as Outlook and PowerPoint.




Outlook users can now exploit the fullscreen mode in OS X Yosemite and El Capitan, making it possible to see multiple items side-by-side. For business users, the update makes it easier to locate a free conference room at a specific time.

Word users can save PDF files to flash drives, while OneNote has gained support for the shapes gallery and the ability to add shapes to pages. Both Excel and PowerPoint have new selection panes that keep track of objects and let users rearrange them at will.

The update, v15.18.0, can be downloaded directly from Microsoft or else installed through Office's AutoUpdate system. People must have an active Office 365 subscription.

Office 2016 first reached the Mac in July, but only attached to Office 365. In September, Microsoft released separate editions that don't require monthly or annual fees, but aren't updated as frequently.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 1,916member
    I went Microsoft Free on my macs a few years ago. Haven't missed them.
    lostkiwimoreck
  • Reply 2 of 21
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,081member
    Now if they'd only release the damn OneDrive for Business app for OS X users. Maybe as long as its taking it will work better than the Windows version which absolutely sucks!
  • Reply 3 of 21
    macxpress said:
    Now if they'd only release the damn OneDrive for Business app for OS X users. Maybe as long as its taking it will work better than the Windows version which absolutely sucks!
    They did before Christmas.

    https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Get-started-with-the-OneDrive-for-Business-Next-Generation-Sync-Client-on-Mac-OS-X-d11b9f29-00bb-4172-be39-997da46f913f?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US&fromAR=1


    freshmaker
  • Reply 4 of 21
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    What about a single installer for all Office 2016 instead of five different installers?
  • Reply 5 of 21
    I have Office 2011 and refuse to buy anything that I have to have an annual subscription. I probably can do anything I need to using Numbers and Pages, but thee are a few things I do on Word and Excel. However, I will never get office 365. It is called a rip off.
  • Reply 6 of 21
    feaco said:
    I have Office 2011 and refuse to buy anything that I have to have an annual subscription. I probably can do anything I need to using Numbers and Pages, but thee are a few things I do on Word and Excel. However, I will never get office 365. It is called a rip off.
    Hardly. $100 a year gets you five installs, and you get to upgrade to new versions when they're available. 
    moreck
  • Reply 7 of 21
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,013member
    eightzero said:
    I went Microsoft Free on my macs a few years ago. Haven't missed them.
    A few years ago, MSOffice for the Mac was absolute shit.  That changed completely with Office365.  It's on-par with the Windows version and it works really well.  I abandoned Pages and Numbers and went back to MSOffice.  It's still the defacto standard in the business world - for now.  If you have to deal with business documents, you should reconsider your stance.
  • Reply 8 of 21
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,013member

    feaco said:
    I have Office 2011 and refuse to buy anything that I have to have an annual subscription. I probably can do anything I need to using Numbers and Pages, but thee are a few things I do on Word and Excel. However, I will never get office 365. It is called a rip off.

    Then you are misinformed, and/or ignorant.  I used to think that way too before I did the math in today's mobile, connected world.  

    $10/mo gets you the ability to install on 5 machines, and use the iOS apps in full-edit mode.  Or pay $99/yr and essentially get two months free.  How much do you think Office would cost as a standalone for five separate machines?  Or would you rather spend/waste your time trying to hack/bootleg the software to run on multiple machines?

    So how much would 5 installs cost separately?  More importantly, you're always current with the software so you essentially get all the versions.  By the time your $10/mo. reaches the cost of the entire package, the software most likely would have been upgraded to where many would buy the software all over again.

    Sure, I'm not a fan of having to subscribe to software, but in the end... that's where it's all going.  I subscribe to Adobe's creative suite for $9/mo to get all Photoshop and Lightroom, whereas considering the $1000+ in the past just for photoshop, it was far cheaper route to just subscribe to it and use it (legally) on multiple machines.

    So it's not a "rip-off"... you're just stuck in the early 2000's.  Time to move on.
    moreck
  • Reply 9 of 21
    sflocal said:
    eightzero said:
    I went Microsoft Free on my macs a few years ago. Haven't missed them.
    A few years ago, MSOffice for the Mac was absolute shit.  That changed completely with Office365.  It's on-par with the Windows version and it works really well.  I abandoned Pages and Numbers and went back to MSOffice.  It's still the defacto standard in the business world - for now.  If you have to deal with business documents, you should reconsider your stance.
    Outlook for Mac is sill crippled compared to the Windows version which makes it difficult for Mac users to function in a company where everyone is expected to be able to work with those features.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 10 of 21
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,257member
    Blaster said:
    sflocal said:
    A few years ago, MSOffice for the Mac was absolute shit.  That changed completely with Office365.  It's on-par with the Windows version and it works really well.  I abandoned Pages and Numbers and went back to MSOffice.  It's still the defacto standard in the business world - for now.  If you have to deal with business documents, you should reconsider your stance.
    Outlook for Mac is sill crippled compared to the Windows version which makes it difficult for Mac users to function in a company where everyone is expected to be able to work with those features.
    I've used both Mac and Windows versions of Excel and Word for decades.   Aside from some font/formatting issues and the use of macros in prior versions, I've never noticed the lack of any features in the Mac version of Office 2011 Excel.   About the worst thing I've noticed are some font/formatting differences.   And the Mac version actually has a few advantages.   If you want to sum individual cells and aren't using the SUM function, on the Windows version you have to press "+" in-between each cell selection.   On the Mac version, it puts in the "+" automatically.    However, if you want to force a linefeed within a cell, it's Alt-Enter in the Windows version and Ctrl-Option-Command-Return on the Mac version.   Other than that, I go back and forth on the same documents all the time without thinking much about it.

    Word does have some differences, mainly relating to how it displays Notes.   The Windows version is better in that regard, but it's a relatively minor issue.

    I'll re-buy Office when they get Outlook to properly sync again with the iPhone, etc.   Ever since iCloud, it doesn't work.   


  • Reply 11 of 21
    sflocal said:

    $10/mo gets you the ability to install on 5 machines, and use the iOS apps in full-edit mode. Or pay $99/yr and essentially get two months free. How much do you think Office would cost as a standalone for five separate machines?

    Well, for the little nonprofit I help with, it cost $25 total. They update their software only when they have to, not just when they can. I suspect that's the case for many people, even those who don't get $5/license installs. Even at $149 for Office home/student, buyers will be saving money in just the second year. And it will continue to work without the annual protection payoff.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 12 of 21
    One thing this update did NOT fix is the buggy behavior of the Apple input devices in Excel. There are dozens of reports on various forums of the need to fix this. MS forum responses indicate they are aware and "working on it" and I was hoping this release would be the fix, but it isn't. Other than that I find MS Office for Mac 2016 to be great. Outlook has nearly 100% functionality of the Windows version, so whoever commented about the frustration of being a Mac user in a Windows-centric organization - that's my world too, and I've had no issues. 
  • Reply 13 of 21
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,242member
    If you work for a company that has a Volume Licensing contract for Office you may be able to purchase a single non-subscription based version of Office 2016 Pro Plus for $9.95 USD as part of the Microsoft Home Use Program. It's not a bad deal and it doesn't matter whether you're using the Mac or PC version at work. The HUP deal also extends to Visio Pro 2016 and Project Pro 2016 for $9.95 each (PC Only). The only thing I found wonky about the deal was the product activation process that requires an online handshake. The older bigass key model was much easier and less failure prone. After using Office 2011 for Mac it's really hard to say whether the new version is worth the upgrade. Excel is great as always but Word always seems a few steps behind. Even after spending 10 bucks the activation process alone annoyed the hell out of me. Having to call Microsoft technical support can get very dicey depending on your native language. You really hate to be rude and unsympathetic but if you cannot carry on a conversation with the person on the other side it's not a happy experience for either party. Text based chat would've been better. Maybe it's the luck of the draw but I've never had problems with Apple's support. Amazon seems pretty good too. This is an area where I wouldn't mind other companies blatantly copying Apple.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 14 of 21
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,013member
    cincytee said:
    sflocal said:

    $10/mo gets you the ability to install on 5 machines, and use the iOS apps in full-edit mode. Or pay $99/yr and essentially get two months free. How much do you think Office would cost as a standalone for five separate machines?

    Well, for the little nonprofit I help with, it cost $25 total. They update their software only when they have to, not just when they can. I suspect that's the case for many people, even those who don't get $5/license installs. Even at $149 for Office home/student, buyers will be saving money in just the second year. And it will continue to work without the annual protection payoff.
    And that's great if it's one machine and the needs are minimal.  I know quote a few people that still use Office 2000 and Office 2010.  They just deal with the issues of running outdated software when it has problems running on more recent versions of Windows, or that they cannot read modern Office documents like .docx & .xlsx that they receive from others.

    I make quite a decent side-business with folks running on such old hardware/software that they have to call me to deal with the headaches that modern tech introduces when they are so far behind on things.  For many, staying in the past just means the money gets spent elsewhere because of it.

    That little nonprofit your "helping" sounds to me like you're "helping" them for free or next to nothing.  Nothing bad with that, and it's noble.  If they had to pay actual people to deal with their archaic systems, it might be a different situation.  
  • Reply 15 of 21
    When sending email from Mac Outlook, the text always appears smaller when viewed in Windows Outlook even though the Mac is set to the same font size.

    Mac Outlook can't create tables in email messages.

    Mac Outlook can't sync contact groups with Exchange server.

    Mac Outlook can't accept or assign Tasks to other Exchange users.

    PST support is too limited:  PST files come up frequently when dealing with offline archives of emails, calendar, contact, notes and tasks data from Exchange accounts.  Not all PST files can be read by Mac Outlook.  Can't access a PST file without first importing the entire contents into a user's Mac Outlook database.  Can't export to PST files that can be accessed in Windows Outlook.  Don't dismiss it because you don't personally use it.

    I often wonder what sort of conditions the Mac developers at Microsoft have to work under.  Are they specifically instructed to leave out certain features from Mac versions of Microsoft applications?  Does the Office for Windows team deliberately withhold information from the Mac team in order to hinder feature parity?
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 16 of 21
    Is it just me or have Microsoft botched OneNote for Mac with today’s update?
    Now I can’t select any handwritten notes I made on iPad with Apple Pencil without having to wait for ages till the process is done. Let alone trying to move it. My whole workflow collapsed! 
    Can anyone explain how to reverse to the previous version and never get any updates again?
    And I’m paying for this service… 


  • Reply 17 of 21
    Is it just me or have Microsoft botched OneNote for Mac with today’s update?
    Now I can’t select any handwritten notes I made on iPad with Apple Pencil without having to wait for ages till the process is done. Let alone trying to move it. My whole workflow collapsed! 
    Can anyone explain how to reverse to the previous version and never get any updates again?
    And I’m paying for this service… 


    No such problem in OneNote for Windows. 

  • Reply 18 of 21
    And still no ability to read PST files without having to import them, or to save PST files at all. The ONE thing that I'd happily throw money at so I can finally stop running a Windows VM just for that feature. It's like they're not even trying.
  • Reply 19 of 21
    I guess the iOS update should follow soon. This version should hopefully have the "Ink" option, which lets me annotate Word documents on the iPad Pro like they showed in the demo.


  • Reply 20 of 21
    rayhill said:
    And still no ability to read PST files without having to import them, or to save PST files at all. The ONE thing that I'd happily throw money at so I can finally stop running a Windows VM just for that feature. It's like they're not even trying.
    While it may be natural to blame Microsoft for missing functionality, the Mac news media and Mac user community share some of the blame.  When reading reviews of Office for Mac on popular sites like MacWorld, Outlook for Mac constantly receives glowing reviews by journalists who probably have never used Outlook for Windows in a large Exchange environment, or had to support Macs in that environment.

    The user community is even worse.  Look in different Mac forums on the net, and most of the comments from Mac users about Office for Mac revolve around Microsoft's choice of colors, whether the Office application icons are pretty enough, or requesting Mac-only features which have nothing to do with improving Exchange or Sharepoint compatibility.  When the folks at Microsoft see those comments, they are all too happy to release Mac versions of Office with "improved cuteness of icons" while claiming "We listened to what Mac users wanted".  If the Mac reviewers and users won't take Office for Mac functionality seriously, why should Microsoft?
    edited January 2016
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