Apple's iPad Pro outsold Microsoft's entire Surface lineup over the holidays

Posted:
in iPad edited February 2016
Consumers have apparently taken a liking to the iPad Pro following its November release, as new data suggests that Apple moved nearly half a million more of the jumbo tablets alone than Microsoft did of its entire Surface lineup.




"We believe Apple sold just over two million iPad Pros while Microsoft sold around 1.6 million Surface devices, a majority of which were Surface Pro and not the more affordable Surface 3," IDC research director Jean Philippe Bouchard said in a release. "With these results, it's clear that price is not the most important feature considered when acquiring a detachable - performance is."

IDC considers tablets like the iPad Pro and Surface -- which are designed to work primarily with first-party keyboard accessories -- in a different category than tablets such as the iPad Air.

"This quarter was unique as we had new detachables in the market from all three of the major platform players," IDC analyst Jitesh Ubrani said. "Despite lukewarm reviews, the iPad Pro was the clear winner this season as it was the top selling detachable, surpassing notable entries from Microsoft and other PC vendors."

"It's also important to note that the transition towards detachable tablets has presented positive opportunities for both Apple and Microsoft," Ubrani added. "However, Google's recent foray into this space has been rather lackluster as the Android platform will require a lot more refinement to achieve any measurable success."

Healthy iPad Pro sales helped Apple keep its market share lead over second-place Samsung, despite a continued slowdown in overall tablet demand. Apple finished the fourth quarter with 24.5 percent of the market, compared to 13.7 percent for the South Korean firm.

Amazon came in a surprise third with its bargain basement Fire tablet, which sold for just $50 during the holiday shopping season and accounted for 7.9 percent of the market. Lenovo and Huawei rounded out the top five.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 62
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,591member
    Logitech have been flogging detachable iPad keyboards since before the Surface appeared. I think the popularity of the iPad Pro is due to something else: the massive screen or the pencil. 
    cornchipnolamacguymacky the mackyBlaster
  • Reply 2 of 62
    dugbugdugbug Posts: 283member
    "With these results, it's clear that price is not the most important feature considered when acquiring a detachable - performance is."
    because there are only ever two reasons: price and performance
    elijahgcornchip
  • Reply 3 of 62
    Of course the Surface didn't sell well. They had $1.35 billion in revenue from all Surface devices combined. Based on their ASP the 1.6 million seems like an accurate guess for sales. 
  • Reply 4 of 62
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,617member
    but..but... Surface fanboys tell us all (almost as bad as Fandroids) how "superior" Surface pro's are and that iOS isn't a "real" OS.

    Ah.. right... they'll just use the tired "iPad pro buyers are just a bunch of iSheeps" excuse.  It's all they have to fall back on.

    iPad Pro outselling all of the Surface Pro's came as ZERO surprise to me.
    magman1979linkmanmdriftmeyerpscooter63williamlondoncornchipnolamacguygtrajljony0
  • Reply 5 of 62
    Rayz2016 said:
    Logitech have been flogging detachable iPad keyboards since before the Surface appeared. I think the popularity of the iPad Pro is due to something else: the massive screen or the pencil. 
    The thing is, the width of the iPad Pro enables a full size keyboard, which is a different ballgame. I also feel Split View is much more useful on it.
    williamlondonzozman
  • Reply 6 of 62
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,919member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Logitech have been flogging detachable iPad keyboards since before the Surface appeared. I think the popularity of the iPad Pro is due to something else: the massive screen or the pencil. 
    The screen & Pencil are definitely a reason. But I think more of it has to do with people buying "detachable" tablets as PC replacements. I think the last paragraph of this article sums pretty well;

    https://techpinions.com/a-netbook-an-ipad-pro-and-the-surface-walk-into-a-bar/42332

    "The promise of something like the iPad and the iPad Pro, ..., is to empower the masses to do MORE than they can on their smartphones with a computing paradigm that focuses on simplicity but still yields sophisticated results."
    nolamacguymacky the macky
  • Reply 7 of 62
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,225member
    I can see the Boston Patriots seriously thinking about switching soon! 
    macky the mackylostkiwi
  • Reply 8 of 62
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,459member
    I can see the Boston Patriots seriously thinking about switching soon! 
    Who are the "Boston Patriots" ??
    anantksundaram
  • Reply 9 of 62
    I'd love me an iPad Pro. What I'm missing is the presence of Pro-apps, like Final Cut or Logic instead of iMovie and Garageband.
    cornchip
  • Reply 10 of 62
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,919member
    I'd love me an iPad Pro. What I'm missing is the presence of Pro-apps, like Final Cut or Logic instead of iMovie and Garageband.
    I'm not sure if you'll FCPX or LPX but the iPad Pro does need software optimized to take advantage of its features / hardware. Just a matter of time.
    williamlondon6Sgoldfish
  • Reply 11 of 62
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    I thought tablets were dead?
    cornchip
  • Reply 12 of 62
    How in the world would IDC know what iPP sales were? They're just pulling a number out of their ass to get headlines. 
  • Reply 13 of 62
    The iPad Pro outselling the Surface is not surprising or notable in any way. Instead, the story is that Surface sales were dramatically higher this quarter than they were in previous holiday periods, making this the first Microsoft success story in hardware since, well, ever. And the increased revenue from their Surface sales were more than enough to offset yet another decline in their traditional software business (not to be confused with their newer cloud and "Office Anywhere" business which continued to increase). In other words, comparing Surface sales to iPad Pro sales contrives to turn success into failure. The real story is that the Surface took Microsoft from practically nothing - and indeed losing billions of dollars - in this space to actually making money and being a factor. Sure, a factor with a niche product, but a factor nonetheless that they can build on, which they are going to try to do by releasing Surface-branded phones targeting enterprise/business customers this year. Claiming otherwise is akin to claiming that Huawei, Asus and Oppo failed this year because they didn't move as many smartphones as Samsung and Apple. Instead, the Surface can be akin to the Chromebook. It was a bad product - a money losing failure - for years when they had their initial strategy of trying to compete directly with Microsoft and steal Windows laptop owners. But instead when they found a niche - the education market as well as promoting the devices as being part of an ecosystem for devoted Android fans by offering Google Play store credits for whoever bought them and pushing their ability to cast Chrome OS tabs to Chromecast and Android TV devices - their market share went from nothing to being 2.8% of all computers sold this year. A threat to Microsoft or Apple on profits? No. But their own niche that they can continue to cultivate and grow? Of course, especially if they can somehow get kids who use them in schools and also have budget Android phones to adopt them for home use. (Google doesn't seem smart enough to promote this angle right now, choosing to instead use the same millennial-driven advertising campaigns that practically everyone else in the tech industry does, but they still could in theory.) And it is a good development. Mac OS X and iOS does not meet everyone's needs or preferences. Having choices - and good ones - is healthy for the marketplace. And since it is impossible for anyone to claim that Microsoft was copying Apple with the Surface line, there is no reason to begrudge Microsoft's being successful at offering an alternative to Apple products for those who want - and especially those who legitimately need - them.
    singularityfreshmakercnocbui
  • Reply 14 of 62
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,072member
    All the news has been positive and pro-Surface from analysts and tech websites. It has been described as a winner that is eating into the iPad’s dominance. The MS fanboys are always touting that the Surface is selling like hotcakes. Surface ads are on every cable channel in existence 24/7. The Surface is now the official tablet of the NFL. Now comes this report that says, “Hold on one damn minute! The iPad Pro ALONE outsold the entire Surface line.” Why does everything in this universe have to be processed by spin-doctors? Are people really that gullible? Is confirming one’s bias more important than the simple truth? Apple fanboys (of which I am one) are just as guilty as any Fandroid or MS drone.
    magman1979williamlondonanantksundaram
  • Reply 15 of 62
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,564member
    Before anyone Jumps up and down, the data is from IDC, and we all hate IDC since they make up data, case and point did Apple say how many pros they sold. Plus you can not sing kumbaya Apple is winning when the data is coming from IDC. You all know they screws something up in their analysis, they never been close to right. 
  • Reply 16 of 62
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,919member
    bulldogs said:
    The iPad Pro outselling the Surface is not surprising or notable in any way. Instead, the story is that Surface sales were dramatically higher this quarter than they were in previous holiday periods, making this the first Microsoft success story in hardware since, well, ever. And the increased revenue from their Surface sales were more than enough to offset yet another decline in their traditional software business (not to be confused with their newer cloud and "Office Anywhere" business which continued to increase). In other words, comparing Surface sales to iPad Pro sales contrives to turn success into failure. The real story is that the Surface took Microsoft from practically nothing - and indeed losing billions of dollars - in this space to actually making money and being a factor. Sure, a factor with a niche product, but a factor nonetheless that they can build on, which they are going to try to do by releasing Surface-branded phones targeting enterprise/business customers this year. Claiming otherwise is akin to claiming that Huawei, Asus and Oppo failed this year because they didn't move as many smartphones as Samsung and Apple. Instead, the Surface can be akin to the Chromebook. It was a bad product - a money losing failure - for years when they had their initial strategy of trying to compete directly with Microsoft and steal Windows laptop owners. But instead when they found a niche - the education market as well as promoting the devices as being part of an ecosystem for devoted Android fans by offering Google Play store credits for whoever bought them and pushing their ability to cast Chrome OS tabs to Chromecast and Android TV devices - their market share went from nothing to being 2.8% of all computers sold this year. A threat to Microsoft or Apple on profits? No. But their own niche that they can continue to cultivate and grow? Of course, especially if they can somehow get kids who use them in schools and also have budget Android phones to adopt them for home use. (Google doesn't seem smart enough to promote this angle right now, choosing to instead use the same millennial-driven advertising campaigns that practically everyone else in the tech industry does, but they still could in theory.) And it is a good development. Mac OS X and iOS does not meet everyone's needs or preferences. Having choices - and good ones - is healthy for the marketplace. And since it is impossible for anyone to claim that Microsoft was copying Apple with the Surface line, there is no reason to begrudge Microsoft's being successful at offering an alternative to Apple products for those who want - and especially those who legitimately need - them.
    Well said, although I'm not sure about the future of WP.  In the last week there were about 3 articles stating that the state of WP is essentially dead so I wonder if it's better off for MS just to kill WP devices and focus on their resources on where they're finding success, like the Surface Book / Pro devices 
  • Reply 17 of 62
    bulldogs said:
    The iPad Pro outselling the Surface is not surprising or notable in any way. Instead, the story is that Surface sales were dramatically higher this quarter than they were in previous holiday periods, making this the first Microsoft success story in hardware since, well, ever. And the increased revenue from their Surface sales were more than enough to offset yet another decline in their traditional software business (not to be confused with their newer cloud and "Office Anywhere" business which continued to increase). In other words, comparing Surface sales to iPad Pro sales contrives to turn success into failure. The real story is that the Surface took Microsoft from practically nothing - and indeed losing billions of dollars - in this space to actually making money and being a factor. Sure, a factor with a niche product, but a factor nonetheless that they can build on, which they are going to try to do by releasing Surface-branded phones targeting enterprise/business customers this year. Claiming otherwise is akin to claiming that Huawei, Asus and Oppo failed this year because they didn't move as many smartphones as Samsung and Apple. Instead, the Surface can be akin to the Chromebook. It was a bad product - a money losing failure - for years when they had their initial strategy of trying to compete directly with Microsoft and steal Windows laptop owners. But instead when they found a niche - the education market as well as promoting the devices as being part of an ecosystem for devoted Android fans by offering Google Play store credits for whoever bought them and pushing their ability to cast Chrome OS tabs to Chromecast and Android TV devices - their market share went from nothing to being 2.8% of all computers sold this year. A threat to Microsoft or Apple on profits? No. But their own niche that they can continue to cultivate and grow? Of course, especially if they can somehow get kids who use them in schools and also have budget Android phones to adopt them for home use. (Google doesn't seem smart enough to promote this angle right now, choosing to instead use the same millennial-driven advertising campaigns that practically everyone else in the tech industry does, but they still could in theory.) And it is a good development. Mac OS X and iOS does not meet everyone's needs or preferences. Having choices - and good ones - is healthy for the marketplace. And since it is impossible for anyone to claim that Microsoft was copying Apple with the Surface line, there is no reason to begrudge Microsoft's being successful at offering an alternative to Apple products for those who want - and especially those who legitimately need - them.
    Bingo.  This market report is for the USA.  So there are 2 million folks that shelled out about $1000 on a jumbo iPad and about 1.6 million that spent between $500 and $1200 on Microsoft Surface/Surface Pro.  I have the Surface 3 LTE ($650 including the keyboard that has a mouse built in) and use it for productivity.  It's OK for media consumption but my Android tablet is far better at that.  I really am wishing that the productivity of Windows was merged with a successful mobile OS with 1 million+ apps.  I think Google will eventually do that with a merger of Chrome OS with Android. Microsoft has tried but the app gap (chasm) is huge right now or/and the apps suck (try Kindle for Windows 8/10 and you'll see it is typical of underdeveloped apps, unlike the iOS and Android versions).  I have to wonder if Apple will ever do that merger, but I doubt it because it's apparent that both lines are cash cows and entail buying into each.  I'm amazed that people spend $1000 on a primarily content consumption device, but that's their prerogative.  The $50 Amazon Fire is OK but it lacks Google services unless you hack it, on the other extreme end on purchase price.  I tend to opt for the less expensive technologies that do pretty much the same thing.
    cnocbui
  • Reply 18 of 62
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,755member
    lkrupp said:
    All the news has been positive and pro-Surface from analysts and tech websites. It has been described as a winner that is eating into the iPad’s dominance. The MS fanboys are always touting that the Surface is selling like hotcakes. Surface ads are on every cable channel in existence 24/7. The Surface is now the official tablet of the NFL. Now comes this report that says, “Hold on one damn minute! The iPad Pro ALONE outsold the entire Surface line.” Why does everything in this universe have to be processed by spin-doctors? Are people really that gullible? Is confirming one’s bias more important than the simple truth? Apple fanboys (of which I am one) are just as guilty as any Fandroid or MS drone.
    But is the the Surface Pro actually eating into iPad's dominance, or is it more likely a Windows laptop replacement that MS gets to make money at instead of the OEM's?

    We can't really compare these two products, as much as people would like to, as one is decidedly a mobile product, and the other is a desktop masquerading, at times, as a mobile tablet. The truth of the matter is that MS hasn't yet created a mobile product in the Surface, as much as they think that they have, and it might never happen unless the Surface Phone is a success. There just isn't enough interest in creating Universal Apps at this point in time for MS to be successful at mobile.


    ericthehalfbee
  • Reply 19 of 62
    steviestevie Posts: 956member
    This makes perfect sense.  People don't need a full operating system anymore.  iOS is plenty good enough or the vast majority of users.
    williamlondonmagman1979boriscletoliquidmarkanton zuykov
  • Reply 20 of 62
    I'd love me an iPad Pro. What I'm missing is the presence of Pro-apps, like Final Cut or Logic instead of iMovie and Garageband.
    It's not a replacement for a Mac Pro or iMac, never mind a Macbook Pro. It's a product for people wanting more than a smartphone on the go, but not the desire to lug a laptop around. The pencil allows artists and other designers to use the product without the need of the keyboard. Think Architecture, Real Estate Agents, Medical, Manufacturing staff, etc.
    edited February 2016 boriscletocornchipnolamacguybrucemcpscooter63
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