Protestors gather at San Francisco Apple Store to support fight against government backdoors

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 2016
Internet rights advocacy group Fight for the Future held a rally outside a flagship San Francisco Apple Store on Wednesday in a show of support as Apple resists government pressure to implement software backdoors.


Courtesy of Fight for the Future


FFTF cofounder Holmes Wilson has closely followed Apple's long-running battle against government backdoors for some time, but Tuesday's court order mandating the company offer assistance in an ongoing FBI investigation was cause for action. Wilson helped organize Wednesday's Apple Store gathering in which a small group of supporters brandished iPhones bearing an Electronic Frontier Foundation sticker reading, "I do not consent to the search of this device."

"It began as a basic privacy issue, but the more we get into it, we learn it's a bigger issue about the future of online security," Wilson told AppleInsider.

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered Apple to assist the FBI in unlocking a passcode-protected iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook. The request requires Apple create specialized software to bypass a passcode attempt counter in iOS 9, thereby leaving the device open to a brute force attack.

Wilson said it's possible that the FBI is leveraging the high-profile terrorist case to push its own agenda forward. The law enforcement body, as well as other U.S. government agencies, have for months argued in favor of prioritized access to encrypted consumer data, and a federal court blessing to procure a first-party workaround is a major step towards that goal.

"They have many, many other tools for getting this information, governments have never been in a better position to get data on targets," Wilson said. "We are living in the golden age of government access to data."

Government players, including the White House, maintain that access will be limited to a single device, namely Farook's iPhone 5c, but Apple CEO Tim Cook is leery of those claims.

In a letter posted to Apple's website mere hours after California District Court Judge Sheri Pym handed down her ruling, Cook railed against the FBI request, saying that coding a software bypass is tantamount to building a backdoor.

"Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create," Cook said. "They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone."

Perhaps more importantly, a government-sponsored action against strong encryption could set international precedent, opening the door for countries that hold little regard for public privacy to demand identical levels of access. For this and other reasons related personal privacy, security and digital rights concerns, Apple has vowed to appeal the matter to the Supreme Court if necessary.

FFTF plans to hold additional rallies next Tuesday at various Apple Store locations around the U.S., and potentially abroad, set to take place at 5:30 p.m. local time.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    bobschlobbobschlob Posts: 1,074member
    THE PEOPLE..... UNITED.....WILL NEVER BE DEFEA.....AWSCREWITWEREFCKD
    cornchiplatifbpbadmonkpscooter63bohicasis
  • Reply 2 of 64
    Looks more like...

    Ah, forget it. I know what it is, not just what it looks like, but if it helps retain our 4th amendment rights, screw it. Maybe the useful idiots will be on our side for once.
    cornchip
  • Reply 3 of 64
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,535member
    Of course... Google and Scamscum are remaining absolutely quiet about it.  Why do anything?  Just let Apple (as usual) do all the blazes while they just ride on Apple's work.

    It's kind of embarrassing I think that Google isn't even mentioned since everyone knows they are about as secure as an unlocked door at a bank with the key still in the doorknob.  Everyone know it... but "shhhhhh.." just let Apple do it and we'll just take credit later.
    brakkencornchipnolamacguymac fanpscooter63jbdragonIanMC2GTRownsUlostkiwibohicasis
  • Reply 4 of 64
    Why don't these kids use Maps to meander over to Pac Heights and protest in front of Diane Feinstein's house…the real piece who is about to fu¢k us all over with legislation if Apple doesn't comply?
    macky the mackyradster360SpamSandwichbadmonkjbdragonbuzdotslostkiwibohicasis
  • Reply 5 of 64
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,568member
    I support Apple and Tim Cook on this issue, but I do not in any way, shape or form support the protesters, as I do not know them, and they're probably the same sorts of people that will protest other causes which frankly speaking, disgusts me. At least they don't seem to be violently inclined, they're not getting all up in people's faces, they're not blocking any traffic and their hygiene seems to be acceptable, so I'll give them props for that at least.


    jbdragon
  • Reply 6 of 64
    Looks more like...

    Ah, forget it. I know what it is, not just what it looks like, but if it helps retain our 4th amendment rights, screw it. Maybe the useful idiots will be on our side for once.
    Who needs the 4th when we have the 2nd!
    buzdots
  • Reply 7 of 64
    jonagold said:
    Who needs the 4th when we have the 2nd!
    It was not part of their blood,
      It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
      They were icy–willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
      Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
      Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
      It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
      It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
      When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

    – Rudyard Kipling

    It’s always important to remember that, while the Constitution does not grant us these rights, we are equally held in our own responsibility to maintain civility, order, and law until such time as they cannot be maintained.
    latifbpSpamSandwichpscooter63justadcomicsbohicasis
  • Reply 8 of 64
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries...
    rfrmac
  • Reply 9 of 64
    jkinsdca said:
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries…
    Unfortunately freedom isn't free…if it costs the lives of a few (or mine) it is well worth it.  Your comment is exact proof why terror is effective.  Bring down a country of 300M+ because 20 people died of gunshot wounds.  Why not go after tobacco, alcohol, driving, McDonald's french fries…I'll take the (non-existent) risk of terror any day if it means my iPhone is kept secure.
    Anibrakkenfallenjttomkarlanton zuykovgtrjkichlineSpamSandwichnolamacguyjbdragon
  • Reply 10 of 64

    jonagold said:
    Who needs the 4th when we have the 2nd!
    It was not part of their blood,
      It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
      They were icy–willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
      Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
      Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
      It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
      When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
      It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
      When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

    – Rudyard Kipling

    It’s always important to remember that, while the Constitution does not grant us these rights, we are equally held in our own responsibility to maintain civility, order, and law until such time as they cannot be maintained.
    I don't disagree, but government's fear of the people was by design.  Of course, a last resort, but an effective one.  Tim is a true defender of our liberty and privacy.  It takes a big pair of guts to do what he's doing.  These are historic moments we will look back at and be thankful that history didn't fork the other direction.
    tomkarlSpamSandwichjbdragonIanMC2tdknoxlostkiwibohicasisjony0
  • Reply 11 of 64
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,568member
    jkinsdca said:
    do you think their tune would change? 
    My tune wouldn't change one bit.

    To put it bluntly, Apple is far more secure than the US govt, and I entrust my information more with Apple than I would with the US govt, as they've already proven numerous times that they cannot be trusted to protect information.

    There have been breaches, there have been attacks, there have been hacks, you even got a crazy old lady that likes to go around barking like a dog, who stored extremely classified, super top secret information on some private server that was located in a bathroom and you have a government that is totally clueless about IT, with their disasterous Obamacare sites. You have people like Snowden, who was able to steal data and run away with it.

    There is no way in hell that this govt should be trusted to have any sort of master key or a way to hack into everybody's iPhones, something that would render all iPhones to be non-secure.




    edited February 2016 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 12 of 64
    jkinsdca said:
    ...no concept of real life.
    You have no concept of law.
    SpamSandwichnolamacguyIanMC2tdknoxjustadcomics
  • Reply 13 of 64
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,535member
    jkinsdca said:
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries...
    You've fallen down to an whole new level of the clueless club, it's not even worth the extra electrons to send to display the characters on the screen.  

    Have fun living in your bubble.
    Anianton zuykovgtrSpamSandwichnolamacguyIanMC2tdknoxspock1234justadcomicslostkiwi
  • Reply 14 of 64
    jkinsdca said:
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries...
    You should look at yourself in the mirror.
  • Reply 15 of 64
    So if the killer had a huewei product would FBI have jurisdiction over Chinese manufacture? Or are you telling us that products NOT controlled by US companies are safe heaven?
    SpamSandwichbobschlobjony0
  • Reply 16 of 64
    appleboy2 said:
    So if the killer had a huewei product would FBI have jurisdiction over Chinese manufacture?
    It’s not about the point of origin. It’s about the rights of US citizens.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 17 of 64
    Guns.  >:)
  • Reply 18 of 64
    jonagold said:
    jkinsdca said:
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries…
    Unfortunately freedom isn't free…if it costs the lives of a few (or mine) it is well worth it.  Your comment is exact proof why terror is effective.  Bring down a country of 300M+ because 20 people died of gunshot wounds.  Why not go after tobacco, alcohol, driving, McDonald's french fries…I'll take the (non-existent) risk of terror any day if it means my iPhone is kept secure.
    Let's not mention the 10-12,000 killed by gun violence every year or maybe the 300 mass shootings last year. 
    tomkarlIanMC2spock1234
  • Reply 19 of 64

    appleboy2 said:
    So if the killer had a huewei product would FBI have jurisdiction over Chinese manufacture?
    It’s not about the point of origin. It’s about the rights of US citizens.
    His point goes to the rights of a US corporation  which when convenient they are considered a person. Are all safe and alarm companies required to give access codes to the government just in case?
    cincymacIanMC2spock1234
  • Reply 20 of 64
    josujosu Posts: 217member
    jonagold said:
    jkinsdca said:
    I do not support Apple and these [email protected]@ protestors. What if there was info on that phone that could prevent another attack.. one say at an apple store in san fran... do you think their tune would change? so stupid these idiots that have no concept of real life.. only the one that was spoon fed them by their parents who set no boundaries…
    Unfortunately freedom isn't free…if it costs the lives of a few (or mine) it is well worth it.  Your comment is exact proof why terror is effective.  Bring down a country of 300M+ because 20 people died of gunshot wounds.  Why not go after tobacco, alcohol, driving, McDonald's french fries…I'll take the (non-existent) risk of terror any day if it means my iPhone is kept secure.
    Maybe I am wrong, but this wasn't the first shooting rampage in 2015, I understand that people got scared in Paris where a shooting rampage is something that virtually never happens, but in the US where you got the Columbine one, the one in the Batman premiere in Colorado, that other in the Connecticut school, that other of the Korean guy in that university I don't remember well where it was, because they kill on a cause I don't see the reason to get more scared, if anything less, because it has a predictability that the other attacks don't have, and the San Bernardino one is not exactly the most deadly,

    I understand the scary scenario after 9-11 but on something that in the US happens any other week I don't see the point of getting scared about it. Don't let buy weapons and you would diminish the problem radically. If in Paris happened is because Brussels is the supermarket of illegal weapons worldwide, so you can be surprised. But drop the right to own firearms and this would be much less risky. And please, don't tell me that you prefer to surrender your privacy and your civil rights than your right to own something that only have a purpose in life, wound or kill other human being, most of the time yourself or a close relative.
    edited February 2016 tomkarlanton zuykovspock1234justadcomicslostkiwi
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