Google, Facebook, Microsoft & Twitter expected to file motions backing Apple in unlock debate

Posted:
in General Discussion
Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter are all expected to file amicus briefs in support of Apple, which is refusing to help the FBI unlock an iPhone 5c belonging to San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook over wider data privacy concerns.




Google, Facebook and Twitter's participation was revealed by sources for Dow Jones, according to CNBC. Sources for the Wall Street Journal -- which is owned by Dow Jones -- added that "several top tech companies" will be filing briefs, with some submitting a joint brief next week. Microsoft has publicly confirmed plans to file, the Journal said.

Executives at Google and Facebook have already expressed public support for Apple, which is looking to vacate a judge's order demanding it provide software to bypass the passcode retry limit in iOS. Farook's phone is set to auto-erase its contents once that limit is hit, making it impossible for the FBI to brute-force an unlock without losing evidence.

Apple maintains that creating such a tool would compromise iOS, in part since it could be used as precedent to force broader cooperation not only from Apple, but other tech companies as well. The government could in theory compel Apple to craft software for other purposes, like surveillance.

Apple's general counsel, Bruce Sewell, will testify in front of a U.S. House of Representatives hearing on the matter on March 1. Among other people appearing in front of the Judiciary Committee will be FBI Director James Comey, who has regularly argued for backdoors in encrypted platforms.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    Right now, I'm glad it is Apple under pressure, because it took the rest of the tech companies a long ass time to file those briefs in support of Apple's position. Can you imagine, if it were a Nexus phone what might have happened? Maybe Google would have just gone and written the code to break encryption before they knew what they had done! Maybe the FBI should have started with an an Android or MS phone and they would have had their precedent. Too bad FBI made a public issue out of this when they could have continued working with Apple behind the scenes. Apple has thought out this issue ahead of time and that's a good thing.
    lostkiwiibillfotoformatpotatoleeksoupbadmonk
  • Reply 2 of 22
    Add Amazon to that list of companies backing Apple. 
    aaron sorensonibill
  • Reply 3 of 22
    Where the hell is this guy ( http://money.cnn.com/2016/02/24/news/apple-government-employees-maricopa-county/ ) gonna get phones for his county now?  us.gov gonna buy Palm tech from HP?


    -C
    califracAnti_Troll
  • Reply 4 of 22
    I wonder... how many of the 10 attempts the FBI has used?  Nine?
    badmonk
  • Reply 5 of 22
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    I find it funny spyware companies like Goog are hoping on the hype train. Free advertising and good reputation right?

    Apple should tell Goog "No thanks", hop off the bandwagon.
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 6 of 22
    Where the hell is this guy ( http://money.cnn.com/2016/02/24/news/apple-government-employees-maricopa-county/ ) gonna get phones for his county now?  us.gov gonna buy Palm tech from HP?


    -C
    BlackBerry will rise from the ashes (assuming things actually get that far.)
    frac
  • Reply 7 of 22
    fracfrac Posts: 480member
    cali said:
    I find it funny spyware companies like Goog are hoping on the hype train. Free advertising and good reputation right?

    Apple should tell Goog "No thanks", hop off the bandwagon.
    No. He should and will...be gracious.
    Seriously, this is not a time for petulance, you lead.
    techlover
  • Reply 8 of 22
    palomine said:
    Right now, I'm glad it is Apple under pressure, because it took the rest of the tech companies a long ass time to file those briefs in support of Apple's position. Can you imagine, if it were a Nexus phone what might have happened? Maybe Google would have just gone and written the code to break encryption before they knew what they had done! Maybe the FBI should have started with an an Android or MS phone and they would have had their precedent. Too bad FBI made a public issue out of this when they could have continued working with Apple behind the scenes. Apple has thought out this issue ahead of time and that's a good thing.
    The thing is, I don't think that the FBI needs Google's help to get into Android phones. 

    But yeah I'm glad another company didn't lead a poor example.
    lostkiwispinnydzebra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    Good. This whole thing is ludicrous. Punishing manufacturers of security products for making them secure is moronic. What next, take manufacturers of door locks to court for impeding the ability of authorities to serve search warrants? Moronic.
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 10 of 22
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,339member
    cali said:
    I find it funny spyware companies like Goog are hoping on the hype train. Free advertising and good reputation right?

    Apple should tell Goog "No thanks", hop off the bandwagon.
    Nope. Every friend, frenemy, competitor or outright enemy needs to be on this with 100% support. That will stop the DOJ in its tracks, and demonstrate to Congress, the voter and the World that personal security is no longer taken for granted by consumers; its a right.
    edited February 2016 fotoformattechloverspinnydzebra
  • Reply 11 of 22
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,591member
    Hmmm. I suppose these companies are joining as a marketing ploy. /s

    hey Comey/DOJ, no one likes your power grab. 
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 12 of 22
    wetlander said:
    I wonder... how many of the 10 attempts the FBI has used?  Nine?
    LOL, imagine that. One last try and all will be gone. Somewhere in the world, there is a collective sigh of exasparation.
  • Reply 13 of 22
    Our new trolls are welcome to express their disgust at Microsoft and Google as well for supporting terrorism. 

    Any time now, guys. 
    pscooter63ibillsuddenly newtonmobiusjbishop1039badmonk
  • Reply 14 of 22
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,862member
    Bravo. Anyone whose been questioning Tim Cook's leadership should take note of the line slowly starting to form behind Tim.
    punkndrublicpscooter63jbishop1039badmonk
  • Reply 15 of 22
    Lovely piece of irony that Microsoft has publicly announced it will be filing a supporting brief while their lawyer's son founder Bill Gates has come out in support of the FBI.
  • Reply 16 of 22
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,947member
    palomine said:
    Right now, I'm glad it is Apple under pressure, because it took the rest of the tech companies a long ass time to file those briefs in support of Apple's position. Can you imagine, if it were a Nexus phone what might have happened? Maybe Google would have just gone and written the code to break encryption before they knew what they had done! Maybe the FBI should have started with an an Android or MS phone and they would have had their precedent. Too bad FBI made a public issue out of this when they could have continued working with Apple behind the scenes. Apple has thought out this issue ahead of time and that's a good thing.
    Wrong. FBI didn't have to start with an Android or MS phone because they HAVE BEEN able to backdoor access those. There's no need to back door something that's already open.
    badmonk
  • Reply 17 of 22
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,947member
    dewme said:
    Bravo. Anyone whose been questioning Tim Cook's leadership should take note of the line slowly starting to form behind Tim.
    Starting with Sog35.
    badmonk
  • Reply 18 of 22
    palomine said:
    Maybe Google would have just gone and written the code to break encryption before they knew what they had done!
    You cannot write code to break (cryptographically sound) encryption unless it is brute-force attack. Code that removes limitations on entering passwords has nothing to do with code that breaks encryption, which is impossible.
    edited February 2016 gatorguy
  • Reply 19 of 22
    davidwdavidw Posts: 938member
    palomine said:
    Right now, I'm glad it is Apple under pressure, because it took the rest of the tech companies a long ass time to file those briefs in support of Apple's position. Can you imagine, if it were a Nexus phone what might have happened? Maybe Google would have just gone and written the code to break encryption before they knew what they had done! Maybe the FBI should have started with an an Android or MS phone and they would have had their precedent. Too bad FBI made a public issue out of this when they could have continued working with Apple behind the scenes. Apple has thought out this issue ahead of time and that's a good thing.

    Kind of reminds me of what Microsoft use to do. MS would pay a small sum to a patent troll, for a license to a questionable patent. Knowing that the patent troll would use the MS license agreement as a way of validating that patent against MS smaller competitors that were using the patent but had limited resources to fight the validity of the patent.  
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 20 of 22
    Many news reports say this is about encryption, but it's not -- it's about something entirely different: authentication (login) and the finite counter that iOS enforces. While it's obviously true that iOS provides encryption, that is not the obstacle the FBI is facing... their challenge is simply not being able to login to the device,
Sign In or Register to comment.