Apple's 2010 15- & 17-inch MacBook Pros, 2009 Xserve become 'vintage'

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited March 2016
Apple this week declared a trio of older products vintage and obsolete, adding a pair of 2010 MacBook Pros and the 2009 Xserve to a list of discontinued hardware service.




Both the 15- and 17-inch MacBook Pro circa 2010, as well as the early 2009 Xserve, are now on the "vintage" products list. Apple considers products that have not been manufactured for more than 5 years, and less than 7, to be vintage.

Vintage products are no longer available for hardware service, unless they were purchased within the state of California, or the country of Turkey. Mac owners in those areas can obtain service from authorized Apple service providers.

The 2010 MacBook Pros and 2009 Xserve are considered to be "obsolete" in the rest of the world. Hardware service is discontinued for all obsolete products with no exceptions.

In California and Turkey, products are classified as obsolete 7 years after they are discontinued.

Prior to this week's update, the most recent additions to Apple's 'vintage and obsolete' list came in December, affecting 2009 iMacs, MacBook Airs, Mac Pros and Time Capsules.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    tzterritzterri Posts: 99member
    Guess I will just have to buy Apple's new 17 Macbook... Oh wait... DAMN
    tallest skillorin schultz
  • Reply 2 of 19
    seankillseankill Posts: 477member
    tzterri said:
    Guess I will just have to buy Apple's new 17 Macbook... Oh wait... DAMN

    I would love a 17" macbook pro myself. My 2012 Retina 15" will be a hand-down to my wife in 3-4 years.
  • Reply 3 of 19
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,692member
    I am using a 2010 15" MBP right now. Unfortunately it recently started exhibiting the graphics card panic of death. I guess I now have no recourse from Apple. This truly was one of the few lemons created by Apple.
  • Reply 4 of 19
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    welshdog said:
    I am using a 2010 15" MBP right now. Unfortunately it recently started exhibiting the graphics card panic of death. I guess I now have no recourse from Apple. This truly was one of the few lemons created by Apple.
    Take a vacation to California
    tallest skil
  • Reply 5 of 19
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 625member
    argh. My father is using a second-hand 2010 17" MBP, refurbished with an after-market SSD. It’s running wonderfully, going to suck to explain if the next major OS X rev won’t install…
  • Reply 6 of 19
    I am writing now on a mid 2010 17" i7 macbook pro still under Applecare including Snow Leopard, as it shipped with that (best?) MacOS... So how does that work? If Apple is serious about sustainability, I might ask how a 5 year obsolescence supports this? It is the best laptop I've ever owned, and rarely runs the fans above 2k, unlike the later 17" i7 quad that I sold shortly after purchasing due to constant fan noise & what I ask if was a poor design... They can pry this out of my cold dead hands. In my opinion a retina 15" is (too) small for professional work, despite the gorgeous high resolution screen...
    edited March 2016 GTRownsUargonaut
  • Reply 7 of 19
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,744member
    I can still get batteries (as of last year, anyway) for my early 2008 MacBook Pro 15-inch (upgraded to 6GB RAM.) Still looks *brand new* and it runs El Cap very nicely, including all the software I need and enjoy. 

    I don't really expect anyone to service it through official channels at this point (nor did I expect that even two years ago), and I'm content to let her run as-is until I finally upgrade. No complaints, really. 
    GTRownsUargonaut
  • Reply 8 of 19
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 575member
    I own and still use a 2006 iMac, and a 2003 PowerMac G5. I'd say that qualifies as sustainable. 
    The G5 runs Logic 9 well enough to record a full band, and the iMac makes a fine office computer since an SSD upgrade.
    I guess it all depends on whether you can get by with older software, which I can, for a little while longer. 
    Snow Leopard is a great place to be "stuck"!
    GTRownsUking editor the grate
  • Reply 9 of 19
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,899member
    I am writing now on a mid 2010 17" i7 macbook pro still under Applecare including Snow Leopard, as it shipped with that (best?) MacOS... So how does that work? If Apple is serious about sustainability, I might ask how a 5 year obsolescence supports this? It is the best laptop I've ever owned, and rarely runs the fans above 2k, unlike the later 17" i7 quad that I sold shortly after purchasing due to constant fan noise & what I ask if was a poor design... They can pry this out of my cold dead hands. In my opinion a retina 15" is (too) small for professional work, despite the gorgeous high resolution screen...
    There's no way that can still be under AppleCare. AppleCare only extends for 3yrs total.
  • Reply 10 of 19
    BlasterBlaster Posts: 97member
    I am writing now on a mid 2010 17" i7 macbook pro still under Applecare including Snow Leopard, as it shipped with that (best?) MacOS... So how does that work? If Apple is serious about sustainability, I might ask how a 5 year obsolescence supports this?
    It makes one wonder how long Apple will support their car if they make one.
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 11 of 19
    volcan said:
    welshdog said:
    I am using a 2010 15" MBP right now. Unfortunately it recently started exhibiting the graphics card panic of death. I guess I now have no recourse from Apple. This truly was one of the few lemons created by Apple.
    Take a vacation to California
    Ok, I've gotta ask:  What's the scoop with taking a vacation to California?
  • Reply 12 of 19
    "There's no way that can still be under AppleCare. AppleCare only extends for 3yrs total." Well yes 3 years from the date of purchase - after ordering many thousands of dollars of replacement hardware that required a newer MacOS, prevented migration and ended up being returned, leftover refurb stock was hunted down that qualified as 'new' and allowed Applecare to be put (and is still in) place on 2010 hardware... When pros feel compelled to plan hardware buying cycles in avoidance of 'free' MacOS updates, is anything wrong with the picture...?
  • Reply 13 of 19
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 893member
    I still enjoy my 1984 MacIntosh, but typically use my 2012 MacBook Pro. The power cord for my 1984 Mac is frayed, so if anyone can recommend a place to order a new one, that would be great.

  • Reply 14 of 19
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Ok, I've gotta ask:  What's the scoop with taking a vacation to California?
    California forces Apple to maintain and support their products longer than anywhere else in the Union. “Vintage” products retain full support in California until they hit “Obsolete”. In fact, Vintage only exists because of California.
  • Reply 15 of 19
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,309member
    bluefire1 said:
    I still enjoy my 1984 MacIntosh, but typically use my 2012 MacBook Pro. The power cord for my 1984 Mac is frayed, so if anyone can recommend a place to order a new one, that would be great.

    It's the exact same power cord as used by every Apple computer before and since 1984.
    tallest skilargonaut
  • Reply 16 of 19
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    digitalclips said:
    It's the exact same power cord as used by every Apple computer before and since 1984.
    Nice of the industry to actually standardize something like that so early. My Apple ][ cords work with anything. I won’t try them on my Mac Pro, but they certainly work with my old iMacs.
  • Reply 17 of 19
    Typing this on my 2010 17 inch MacBook Pro. I would have bought a new one three years ago, and probably another one last year, if only they still made 17 inch laptops. But since they don't, I kept upgrading it with more RAM and an SSD (not from Apple, of course) and it's still going strong.

    I can't help but wonder why Apple doesn't want to sell high end laptops to me anymore. They've lost at least two sales from me so far, and I imagine I'm not the only one.

  • Reply 18 of 19
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,899member
    Typing this on my 2010 17 inch MacBook Pro. I would have bought a new one three years ago, and probably another one last year, if only they still made 17 inch laptops. But since they don't, I kept upgrading it with more RAM and an SSD (not from Apple, of course) and it's still going strong.

    I can't help but wonder why Apple doesn't want to sell high end laptops to me anymore. They've lost at least two sales from me so far, and I imagine I'm not the only one.


    Umm...because they weren't big sellers? Just because a few people complain doesn't mean everyone wants them. 
  • Reply 19 of 19
    Until last Friday I was using exclusively my 2006 17" MacBook Pro (OS 10.6.8). I'm still using it for applications that haven't survived to be operational on my just-last-Thursday-received mid-2015 15" MacBook Pro with Retina display (e.g., Adobe Photoshop CS5). I am not a particularly happy camper. Sure, the Retina display is cool. However, it seems Apple has adopted counterproductive features, such as a trackpad that reacts TO EVERYTHING. And, of course, I miss the additional screen real estate of my still-functional 17 incher.
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