Review: Apple's 9.7" iPad Pro is professional-grade, powerful & pricey

Posted:
in iPad edited April 2016
After being neglected in 2015, Apple's 9.7-inch iPad has received a much-needed professional makeover, gaining key features from the 12.9-inch iPad Pro and even outperforming it in a few ways. It's a substantial upgrade, and one we find absolutely worthy of the "Pro" moniker, though the $599 starting price may deter some buyers.



What is it?



When the first iPad was announced in 2010, it came in one size: 9.7 inches. Though other models have since joined the fray, Apple has always returned to the 9.7-inch form factor as its flagship model. The company has done that once again in 2016.




The new 9.7-inch iPad Pro adds Apple's Smart Connector for portable, magnetically attachable accessories (like the Smart Keyboard), as well as a four-speaker system and a faster A9X processor. It also boasts the best Retina display Apple has ever put on a mobile device, thanks to glare reduction and new True Tone technology.

It also carries a new, higher starting price of $599 for 32 gigabytes, and there's a new rose gold color option.

Who's it for?



Tablet lovers who want more input options from Apple's iPad. Artists and note takers. Cutting edge early adopters.

Though Apple has pitched the 9.7-inch iPad Pro as a PC replacement, iOS isn't quite at that level of capability --?yet -- especially for power users. Still, we think there's a sizable portion of the computing market who would happily get by, and perhaps be even more productive, with the iPad Pro.

Design and hardware






Upon setting up the new iPad Pro, one of the first things you'll notice is the new True Tone display. Using built-in sensors, the smaller iPad Pro adjusts the colors on the display, allowing you to see colors as they're meant to be seen, regardless of ambient light conditions.

Paired with an improved glass cover that reduces glare even further, Apple has made what was already a stunning Retina display and improved it. Not even the 12.9-inch iPad Pro has this feature, and it definitely shows when both devices are displayed side by side in bright conditions.




While they won't beat a pair of headphones, the four-speaker array on the iPad Pro pumps out impressive sound for such a small device. These are on par, if not better than, pretty much any laptop speakers you've ever heard.




Despite these changes, Apple has managed to retain the same form factor as the previous-generation iPad Air 2, though the Pro does have an unsightly camera bump on the back. That's because the iSight camera has seen a major upgrade -- a 12-megapixel lens that matches the iPhone 6s and iPhone SE, and outperforms the 12.9-inch iPad. It also features True Tone flash for the first time ever in an iPad.




We're happy to say that the camera bump on the iPad Pro does not cause the device to rock at all when it is flat on a table. That doesn't excuse its aesthetics, however.

The front camera also shoots at 5 megapixels, and features Apple's Retina Flash.

New input options



Like the larger iPad, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro also brings Apple's Smart Connector into the fold. Its inclusion is welcome and helps to make the iPad Pro a more suitable laptop replacement, though the smaller 9.7-inch form factor does place some constraints on keyboard size.




Considerably smaller than the Smart Keyboard of the full size 12.9 inch iPad Pro, the compact Smart Keyboard designed exclusively for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro seems like it should be harder to type on that it actually is. It's about 90 percent of the width of the larger model (or Apple's standard MacBook or USB Bluetooth Keyboard), so if feels more cramped, especially for users with big hands.

However, we found touch typing on the smaller Smart Keyboard to feel quite natural. What's more of a stretch is when you lift your fingers off the home row of keys and try to touch type. If you're used to a standard keyboard, hunt and peck typing seems to require more adjustment. It's also takes some time to adjust to the shift key when typing mixed capitalization; the shift key (along with control, option and command keys) are all tighter than your fingers expect, making key combinations require more thought than basic typing.




As with its larger sibling, the smaller iPad Pro Smart Keyboard pops up key combination shortcuts when you hold down a modifier key like the command key. However, this temporary cheat sheet doesn't always display all the options available.

For example, when typing text in a Mail message, holding down command shows options for adding an attachment, changing the quote level and minimizing the draft window. However it doesn't show keyboard shortcuts for entering bold text or italics, even though those options are available. Those shortcuts are, however, represented onscreen at the lower edge of the display, along with buttons for undo, attaching a photo, and smart suggestions.




The Smart Keyboard includes a keyboard button for presenting the customary iOS international keyboard selections (including emoji symbols), but it lacks the MacBook's familiar fn (function) key or the top row of buttons that are conventionally mapped to screen brightness, Expos? and audio playback controls. Also unlike a typical MacBook keyboard, the iPad Pro's Smart Keyboard lacks backlit illumination.

The 9.7-inch iPad Pro also gains compatibility with the Apple Pencil, and just like the larger iPad, it works as you'd expect, with virtually no latency and outstanding performance. We could see where the 9.7-inch form factor could be far more ideal for some artists and note takers who want to stand and hold the tablet with one hand while drawing with the pencil in their other.




iOS limitations



While the design of the iPad Pro and its accessories are outstanding, its operating system still lags behind.

To be fair, improvements have been made, especially with new features like side-by-side two-app multitasking, slide-over, and picture picture in picture. But progress has been incremental, and iOS still feels decidedly more like a smartphone operating system than the full realization of the future of computing.




And the 9.7-inch iPad Pro handles all of those functions without issue. Though its A9X processor has half the ram of the 12.9-inch model, which means some apps won't stay open as long in the background, you probably won't notice while using it. This iPad is fast.

If you know the limitations of iOS, particularly with multitasking and sometimes-frustrating functions like text selection, and you're OK with those, you won't be disappointed. But if you're an iPad newcomer and think this is going to replace your Mac or PC, there will need to be some compromises made.

We remain hopeful that the addition of the Smart Connector and Apple Pencil are a signal that Apple plans to open up the iPad to new input methods that could further improve the experience and make the device a more suitable PC replacement, for those who want to do so. As the Apple Pencil has shown, while a user's finger will always be the preferred input method on an iPad, offering new ways of interacting with the device does not necessitate abandoning those principles.

Here's hoping Apple addresses some of those lingering iOS-related issues with this year's anticipated release of iOS 10. We expect to get our first glimpse of what's to come at the company's annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June.




Conclusion



There's a lot to like about the 9.7-inch iPad Pro --?the hardware is second to none, and the addition of the Smart Connector and Apple Pencil are game changers for the future of Apple's tablet lineup. This is Apple's most powerful, versatile and capable iPad to date, and it's by far the best tablet in this price range on the market.

For many, the sticking point may be that very price -- Apple has axed the $499 16-gigabyte tier, opting to start at $599 for 32 gigabytes. While we think there's a lot of value in the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, buyers who aren't interested in using the Pencil or Smart Connector will probably find the $399 iPad Air 2 offers more bang for the buck. It has the same form factor and still offers decent performance at an outstanding price.

But if any of the upgraded components, especially Apple Pencil and Smart Connector support, appeal to you, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is an easy recommendation. The iPad continues to be the standard bearer in the tablet market, and the 9.7-inch form factor is once again Apple's flagship model.



Score: 4 out of 5



Pros

  • Brings the best of the 12.9-inch model, including Smart Connector and A9X
  • Smart Keyboard and Apple Pencil make this iPad more versatile than ever
  • New True Tone screen and glare reduction make it Apple's best-ever mobile display
  • Still amazingly thin and light despite numerous hardware improvements
  • Best-in-class 12-megapixel camera and flash (if you care)


Cons

  • Starting price of $599 may be too steep for some
  • RAM stays at 2 gigabytes, matching iPad Air 2
  • Lightning port is USB 2, only 12.9-inch model has faster USB 3
  • Ugh, the camera bump


Where to buy



Before you buy a new iPad Pro, see AppleInsider's comprehensive trade-in guide to find out where you can get the most money for your previous generation model.

The 9.7-inch iPad Pro is available to purchase through Apple and its authorized reseller channel, which includes all of the leading resellers listed in our iPad Price Guide. Among them is AppleInsider partner B&H, which carries the full lineup, as well as the official Smart Keyboard and Apple Pencil. Unlike Apple and virtually every other reseller, however, B&H will not collect sales tax on your new iPad Pro order if you live outside NY. It also has 90% of the lineup in stock as of press time. As such, most customers will save between $45 and $80 on their new iPad Pro order.

9.7" iPad Pro

32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi Only for $599.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi Only for $599.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi Only for $599.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi Only for $599.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi + Cellular for $729.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi + Cellular for $729.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi + Cellular for $729.00
32GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi + Cellular for $729.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi Only for $749.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi Only for $749.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi Only for $749.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi Only for $749.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi + Cellular for $879.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi + Cellular for $879.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi + Cellular for $879.00
128GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi + Cellular for $879.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi Only for $899.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi Only for $899.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi Only for $899.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi Only for $899.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Silver WiFi + Cellular for $1,029.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Space Gray WiFi + Cellular for $1,029.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Gold WiFi + Cellular for $1,029.00
256GB 9.7" iPad Pro Rose Gold WiFi + Cellular for $1,029.00

If you're a customer on the fence between a 9.7" iPad Pro and a 12.9" iPad Pro, B&H this week is also offering between $20-$100 off all 32GB and 128GB 12.9" iPad Pros with no sales tax outside NY, which are also the lowest prices anywhere by a wide margin, according to our iPad Price Guide.

12.9" iPad Pro
32GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Silver) for $749.00 ($50 discount)
32GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Space Gray) for $779.00 ($20 discount)
32GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Gold) for $749.00 ($50 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Silver) for $849.00 ($100 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Space Gray) for $879.00 ($80 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Gold) for $849.00 ($100 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Silver) for $999.00 ($80 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Space Gray) for $999.00 ($80 discount)
128GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Gold) for $909.00 ($89 discount)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Silver) for $1,099.00 (pre order)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Space Gray) for $1,099.00 (pre order)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi Only, Gold) for $1,099.00 (in stock)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Silver) for $1,229.00 (in stock)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Space Gray) for $1,229.00 (in stock)
256GB 12.9" iPad Pro (Wi-Fi + 4G LTE, Gold) for $1,229.00 (in stock)
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 48
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,976member
    AWesome!
  • Reply 2 of 48
    why-why- Posts: 305member
    I like the smaller form factor tbh. I saw a man using the 12.9 in iPad Pro on my flight to Paris and y'know you hear everyone talking about how big it is but you never really understand until you see it in person. Now, I've got a Surface Pro 3 and while it's a big tablet it's not quite that monstrous, so I think the smaller size is a good step for people who want something more akin to a laptop than a giant drawing pad
  • Reply 3 of 48
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Leaked:

    The 2017 iPad Pro for those looking for more computer-like features.


    rogifan_newrs1919pscooter63ai46
  • Reply 4 of 48
    why- said:
    I like the smaller form factor tbh. I saw a man using the 12.9 in iPad Pro on my flight to Paris and y'know you hear everyone talking about how big it is but you never really understand until you see it in person. Now, I've got a Surface Pro 3 and while it's a big tablet it's not quite that monstrous, so I think the smaller size is a good step for people who want something more akin to a laptop than a giant drawing pad
    why- said:
    I like the smaller form factor tbh. I saw a man using the 12.9 in iPad Pro on my flight to Paris and y'know you hear everyone talking about how big it is but you never really understand until you see it in person. Now, I've got a Surface Pro 3 and while it's a big tablet it's not quite that monstrous, so I think the smaller size is a good step for people who want something more akin to a laptop than a giant drawing pad
    why- said:
    I like the smaller form factor tbh. I saw a man using the 12.9 in iPad Pro on my flight to Paris and y'know you hear everyone talking about how big it is but you never really understand until you see it in person. Now, I've got a Surface Pro 3 and while it's a big tablet it's not quite that monstrous, so I think the smaller size is a good step for people who want something more akin to a laptop than a giant drawing pad
    My Macbook is a 13". Perfect size. I hope they won't ditch the 12.9" iPad Pro. I'm almost at the savings point where I can get one. Then my Macbook will go up for sale.
    ai46
  • Reply 5 of 48
    why-why- Posts: 305member
    why- said:
    I like the smaller form factor tbh. I saw a man using the 12.9 in iPad Pro on my flight to Paris and y'know you hear everyone talking about how big it is but you never really understand until you see it in person. Now, I've got a Surface Pro 3 and while it's a big tablet it's not quite that monstrous, so I think the smaller size is a good step for people who want something more akin to a laptop than a giant drawing pad
    My Macbook is a 13". Perfect size. I hope they won't ditch the 12.9" iPad Pro. I'm almost at the savings point where I can get one. Then my Macbook will go up for sale.

    how do you feel about the 12 inch MacBook as mentioned above?
  • Reply 6 of 48
    pogo007pogo007 Posts: 43member
    Apple's iPad line up is just getting more and more confusing. I think with their current lineup will confuse customers. They are starting to have to many different models. On top of that the new model they released is smaller and has newer features that it's bigger counter part. I remember a 1 year ago we had a debate on putting Mac OS X on the iPad. Now with these bigger models it's never been more evident that IOS is just not up to par for a device that size. It also mind boggles me that iOS still lacks a file exploerer and the ability to attach multiple documents to a email. I think customers that don't need to do to much artistic work should just stick to getting a MacBook Air.
  • Reply 7 of 48
    what's so confusing, honestly if someone is so confused by there being a choice between a half dozen different models then perhaps they ought to be buying an etch a sketch instead
    rs1919mike1jony0ai46brakken
  • Reply 8 of 48
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 677member
    These are the worst camera angles I've ever seen on AI. 

    I'm glad Dilger is giving the other writing lessons. Mikey is finnally readable! Good work!

    I reckon the pricing for 9.7" Pro is spot on in line with Apple's standards. This Pro will have a 2-yr cycle, and will be $100 cheaper next year. 

    I fully agree with the erk camera hump though, and keyboard shortcuts for bold etc are necessary, but these iPads are excellent!
    baconstang
  • Reply 9 of 48
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,335member
    pogo007 said:
    Apple's iPad line up is just getting more and more confusing. I think with their current lineup will confuse customers. They are starting to have to many different models. On top of that the new model they released is smaller and has newer features that it's bigger counter part. I remember a 1 year ago we had a debate on putting Mac OS X on the iPad. Now with these bigger models it's never been more evident that IOS is just not up to par for a device that size. It also mind boggles me that iOS still lacks a file exploerer and the ability to attach multiple documents to a email. I think customers that don't need to do to much artistic work should just stick to getting a MacBook Air.
    The line is not confusing, unless you can't keep track of four options which might be difficult.  First, you have "mini", "Air" and "Pro".  When it comes to "Pro" you have two sizes.  After that, it's just how much memory and if you want cellular.  See? I've just explained that to you in 15 seconds. Not complicated.  Everything else in their line up is old and can be purchased for less, but that's not what they are selling anyway.  Apples has less iPad models than they have laptop models. Hardly confusing.

    There has never been a debate about putting OS X on an iPad... it's only people like you who think that would somehow be a good idea. If you think that's a good idea, then a Microsoft Surface might be an option for you. It's a worthless tablet if you're trying to use desktop apps.  So you see people with them using them exactly like a laptop and plugging in a mouse. Just get a decent laptop.  I never see anyone using them as a tablet.

    You need to update your arguing points. You can attached multiple files to an email.  First, if you have an app that can do it... then it's easy.  You can do it in the email composition screen.  Tap somewhere to open a menu and then you can pick "Insert Photo or Video" or "Add Attachment".  You can then repeat this process to add as many photos, videos, or documents as you want to the email.

    There's a big reason why there isn't a "file explorer". Primarily, we've moved on from that primitive form of computing where we think of files and folders.  That should not be required to use a computer. To simplify the computing experience, Apple chose to remove the "Finder" from the OS and think in terms of "app" silos.  Not only is this more secure (since one app can't just go and browse the other app's contents) but it also allows the app developer determine how information is exchanged.  iOS has powerful features for copying and opening files into other apps.  Or you could just implement iCloud Drive and access those files in email.  For instance, in my app I just exported a PDF file to iCloud Drive and then opened Mail and added it as an attachment all without having a connection to the Internet.  iCloud Drive IS your file system that is automatically synced to all of your devices (when connected to the Internet).

    Last, my wife has been using the iPad Pro 13" since she lent her 13" MBP to a coworker whose MBP went down.  After a few days, she said "I'm really liking using this as my main computer".  Now she isn't a programmer and doesn't need "desktop" apps, so she is doing just fine with it as her main work computer.  It's actually much faster and fluid than a small Macbook Air in her opinion and the benchmarks show the same thing: http://wccftech.com/apple-a9xipad-pro-benchmarks/

    Think about that for a second... the A9X is FASTER than common Core i5 Intel processors.  I can tell you the thing is a beast of a machine and I suspect more "desktop" like enhancements coming in iOS 10 this summer.  When the A10X comes out in a year... I think the tables are going to turn.
    edited April 2016 kevin keetmaynetmagepscooter63stevehbanchoai46
  • Reply 10 of 48
    Take-home message - a slick device saddled with a romper room OS.

    Spot on review - I've tried many times to manage the shortcomings of iOS, only to be frustrated at every turn.  Anything over and above the most elementary tasks are clumsy at best if not impossible.  When iOS gets a grown ups' version, I'll leave my MacBook Pro at home.  Until then, it's just for fun.
    cnocbui
  • Reply 11 of 48
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,335member
    Take-home message - a slick device saddled with a romper room OS.

    Spot on review - I've tried many times to manage the shortcomings of iOS, only to be frustrated at every turn.  Anything over and above the most elementary tasks are clumsy at best if not impossible.  When iOS gets a grown ups' version, I'll leave my MacBook Pro at home.  Until then, it's just for fun.
    What are you trying to accomplish exactly that iOS is not performing for you? Just curious. I'm hoping that with the pro talk that iOS 10 will address shortcomings.
    stevehai46
  • Reply 12 of 48
    bb-15bb-15 Posts: 257member
    If a person needs the Pencil, more than 64GB of storage, the latest SOC or the connector, then get the 9.7 inch IP Pro. But otherwise the IP Air 2 is a better deal. It's still pretty fast and it is a lot cheaper at $499 for 64GB.
    netmage
  • Reply 13 of 48
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    "Apple's 9.7" iPad Pro is professional-grade, powerful & pricey".

    Really? I cannot do with it the professional and powerful tasks that I need and that even the slowest cheapest Mac can do. Bring a true Mac tablet!
    singularityAI2xxx
  • Reply 14 of 48
    shevshev Posts: 80member
    Is it better than we deserve? I'm on the fence about buying one but if it's better than we deserve then I'll definitely buy it  :|
    steveh
  • Reply 15 of 48
    This article is in need of some more proofreading and corrections. 
  • Reply 16 of 48
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,705member
    bb-15 said:
    If a person needs the Pencil, more than 64GB of storage, the latest SOC or the connector, then get the 9.7 inch IP Pro. But otherwise the IP Air 2 is a better deal. It's still pretty fast and it is a lot cheaper at $499 for 64GB.
    Yeah but the ipad air 2 is also running a generation older processor in an area where SOCs are rapidly evolving, and really the 9.7 inch ipad pro is what should have been released last September as the next ipad, the ipad air 3 if you will.  But apparently if Apple whack 'pro' on the end of it that makes it worth an extra 20 per cent (plus accessories if you want the pro to mean more than just sticker shock).

    The pricing strategy for this thing is the opposite of the pricing strategy for the iphone SE, and iPads are already suffering in sales. bizarre

    I won't be buying because of the price alone.  I will stick to the ipad 3 a while longer.
    edited April 2016 netmage
  • Reply 17 of 48
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,055member
    I'm totally not understanding what the proponents of putting OS X on the iPad are expecting they would get that is not already being provided by the MacBook or MacBook Air.

    iOS and OS X are two different operating systems designed for two different user experience models. One is immersive, single application centric, and touch-first and the other is multiple application, multi-window, and keyboard + mouse driven. Each operating system is purposely designed to optimally exploit the platform that it was designed to run on. Running iOS on a Mac or OS X on an iPad wouldn't do anyone any favors. 

    I think that people asking for OS X as it's currently implemented to run on iPad are asking the wrong question based on an assumption that iOS and OS X are the only choices. The real ask should be that Apple develop a single operating system that exploits the best of any platform that it runs on and provides an optimal user experience that is not compromised or inhibited in any way by the lack of mouse, keyboard, or touch and has all of the best features of any OS with immersive single application focus and scattered windows all at the same time. Maybe you call it Unicorn OS.

    Microsoft's attempt at the Unicorn OS is Windows 8 and Windows 10. How's that working out? Maybe in a perfect world where you can make all legacy applications walk the plank and get left behind you may be able to approach something reasonable. But it will never be easy. Look at Microsoft's flailing with Windows 8 and the deprecation of a lot of the touch-first approach from Windows 8 to keyboard+mouse centric Windows 10. It's going to involve a lot of compromise and it will probably take the better part of a decade for users to "get it." When I look at Microsoft's attempt with Surface I struggle to understand why it's ever seen as an improvement versus a traditional clamshell PC for keyboard-mouse interactions. Hence the Surface Book. As a tablet, requiring a keyboard+mouse to be productive doesn't make sense.  Trying to run legacy Windows apps that don't handle high-DPI monitors is not a pleasant experience either. Legacy is a boat anchor. 

    If Apple tries to go down the same one-size-kinda-sorta-but-not-always path as Microsoft they'd hit the same issues with backward compatibility, legacy apps, and compromises and confusion throughout the user experience. They'd also be ignoring the fundamental changes that have occurred in personal computing over the past 10 years, which is that for the vast majority of users the smartphone and tablet have replaced the traditional PC for personal use. At some point we'll all look at legacy operating systems that were designed around human-computer interaction models that were formulated in the mid-1980s and marvel at the crude complexities and mechanizations that humans had to endure just to accomplish the most basic of personal tasks like sending a document or picture to someone or balancing their checkbook. You can only drag along the horseless carriage paradigm for so long if you're future potential is something akin to a Tesla.  Sure they'll be people in industry using the ancient computer paradigms well into the future just like there are still ancient industrial machines gobbling up power in old factories, but at a personal human level the die has been cast and handhelds and wearables that interact with humans via natural interaction mechanisms will rule the day. Apple's iOS platform is clearly in a better position to get Apple to the next generation and beyond. OS X is a proud warrior built for a past generation of battles - but its significance and capabilities peaked a half dozen years ago, much like Windows, and it'll slowly slide into its place in history while iOS and its descendants take on the next generation of challenges. Putting OS X on a platform built for iOS would be like putting a boat anchor for an aircraft carrier on your speedboat. 


    edited April 2016 pscooter63stevehnolamacguyjony0
  • Reply 18 of 48
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    dewme said:
    I'm totally not understanding what the proponents of putting OS X on the iPad are expecting they would get that is not already being provided by the MacBook or MacBook Air.

    Just as an example, a small (pocketable) and light (400 to 600 g) Mac tablet would be the ultimate presentation tool for Keynote and PowerPoint previously made in a Mac desktop. Because presentations on Mac are not compatible with iOS. Unless you use very simple presentations. Just try with animations, transitions, video, audio, tables, formatting, backgrounds, special fonts, etc.
  • Reply 19 of 48
    SilicoSilico Posts: 7member
    I work in the medical field and despite a lot of initial iPad excitement, I rarely see anyone (clinicians, administrators or students) using one these days. I use my iPad to read newspapers, watch videos, search the web - but for anything else, including work, I'll take my 2015 retina Macbook any day.
  • Reply 20 of 48
    With both iBooks and my PDF files, I like to read/annotate in portrait mode. Yet, when one uses the Apple keyboard, this is impossible to do -- one is stuck with landscape. 

    It's six years into the iPad. Why is there no solution yet from Apple for this simple issue (I've written to them about a couple of times, over the years)? Or is there, and I am just unaware of it? Is there a third-party solution that someone might be aware of?
    edited April 2016
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