Apple SVPs Schiller and Federighi discuss Siri, Messages and more in Q&A session

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2016
Apple executives Phil Schiller and Craig Federighi on Tuesday took part in a casual interview to discuss the many software and services enhancements revealed at this week's Worldwide Developers Conference.




At a live taping of John Gruber's Daring Fireball podcast "The Talk Show," marketing chief Schiller said this year's WWDC announcements illustrate Apple's focus on delivering a solid foundation for developers. Through app extensions, APIs and SDKs, Apple offers a lattice onto which developers can build.

Siri is a good example of the company's approach. During yesterday's keynote SVP of Software Engineering Federighi announced a third-party Siri SDK, opening the door to powerful voice recognition and artificial intelligence technologies.

There are a few caveats, however. Most notably, integration will be restricted to a handful of app categories well within Siri's current capabilities, like messaging, payments, ride booking, photo search and workouts.

Federighi said the decision to limit access follows Apple's mantra of offering customers only the best user experience. Additional app categories will of course be added as the program progresses and Siri gains an understanding of new domains, he said.

In one of the more interesting tidbits to come out of Tuesday's interview, Federighi explained first-party app "deletion" in iOS 10 is a misnomer. When the mobile operating system debuts this fall users will be able to remove unwanted or rarely used Apple apps from their home screens and delete associated data, but the software binaries technically remain a part of iOS. Thus, it might be more accurate to say users will be able to hide apps in iOS 10.

Considering the amount of time Apple spent detailing new Messages enhancements during Monday's keynote it perhaps comes as no surprise that the topic came up in Tuesday's Q&A. The company knows iPhone users spend the most time in Messages, which is why it was given the most onstage time, the executives said. Federighi joked that developers were more excited about emojis additions than the new Apple File System. Third-party app integration, support for transactions, all-new effects and support for transactions are among the many notable features coming to Messages in iOS 10.

Schiller and Federighi's wide roving interview also covered concerns about the Mac App Store, sentiment regarding Apple's place in the artificial intelligence arms race, app subscriptions and differential privacy, among other topics.

The show was streamed live and a replay should be available for download on Gruber's site soon.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,283member
    There is going to be an awful lot of crap on that Imessage store. 
  • Reply 2 of 13
    irelandireland Posts: 17,570member
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 3 of 13
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,922member
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    Why would that whet someone's appetite to get an iPhone when they're getting all those features right on their Android phone? Over at the Verge a number of posters said if Apple made this cross-platform they would definitely switch to Android. How is that good for Apple? If anything I hope this means Apple is going to put a real focus on more 1st party apps. Apple shouldn't be satisfied with an iPhone users home screen being full up with Google, Facebook and Microsoft apps.
    mwhitenetmagelolliverjony0
  • Reply 4 of 13
    williamhwilliamh Posts: 651member
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    Who really gives a crap?  Omg, a middle finger emoji. 
    lolliver
  • Reply 5 of 13
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    The only benefit to having an android port of "messages" would be iphone users wouldn't have to use Whatsapp or Facebook Messenger to contact non-iphone users. I think they'd be better off trying to integrate those services into the messages app, turn SMS+iMessage into SMS+iMessage+Whatsapp+FBM+whateverotherserviceispopular
  • Reply 6 of 13
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,527member
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    That makes no sense at all.  Apple doesn't monetize iMessage in a manner like WhatsApp or SnapChat, etc, and so there is no benefit to extend that cross-platform.  Clearly Apple Music is a different case.  And so was iTunes on Windows, as it opened up the iTunes Music Store and ownership of an iPod to Windows users (so the benefits to get into iPod and music services outweighed the negative to Mac).
    lolliverjony0
  • Reply 7 of 13
    Apple doesn't need to make iMessage cross platform. They allowed Siri to work with messaging Apps, so if you need to send a message to that troglodyte using another platform then just tell Siri to do it for you using whatever App they have.

    As to restricting Siri to certain App categories right now, this is just typical Apple taking things slow. They did the exact same thing with multitasking by initially opening it up to more common tasks before making it available to all Apps. They'll do the same with Siri.
    repressthislolliverjony0
  • Reply 8 of 13
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,954member
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    That would be the same as licensing the hardware. If you want the iOS experience then buy an iOS device.
    repressthislostkiwilolliverjony0
  • Reply 9 of 13
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,922member
    adm1 said:
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    The only benefit to having an android port of "messages" would be iphone users wouldn't have to use Whatsapp or Facebook Messenger to contact non-iphone users. I think they'd be better off trying to integrate those services into the messages app, turn SMS+iMessage into SMS+iMessage+Whatsapp+FBM+whateverotherserviceispopular
    I contact non-iphone users all the time via the messages app. Does Whatsapp and Facebook Messenger treat those messages differently?
  • Reply 10 of 13
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,922member

    brucemc said:
    ireland said:
    So make the damn app cross-platform so we can use it and its features and its emoji set to message everyone. Give Android users one look at that emoji set and it'll whet their appetite for an iPhone.
    That makes no sense at all.  Apple doesn't monetize iMessage in a manner like WhatsApp or SnapChat, etc, and so there is no benefit to extend that cross-platform.  Clearly Apple Music is a different case.  And so was iTunes on Windows, as it opened up the iTunes Music Store and ownership of an iPod to Windows users (so the benefits to get into iPod and music services outweighed the negative to Mac).
    And this is why I think Tim and Luca's whole pivot to services on the earnings calls is a bunch of BS. Next to nothing announced yesterday creates new monetized services. The only thing Apple could make money off of is if, say, developers charge for iMessage stickers and Apple gets its 30% cut. Nothing else they announced had any sort of monetization component (Pay is still just about secure authentication not replacing PayPal).
  • Reply 11 of 13
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,114member

    brucemc said:
    That makes no sense at all.  Apple doesn't monetize iMessage in a manner like WhatsApp or SnapChat, etc, and so there is no benefit to extend that cross-platform.  Clearly Apple Music is a different case.  And so was iTunes on Windows, as it opened up the iTunes Music Store and ownership of an iPod to Windows users (so the benefits to get into iPod and music services outweighed the negative to Mac).
    And this is why I think Tim and Luca's whole pivot to services on the earnings calls is a bunch of BS. Next to nothing announced yesterday creates new monetized services. The only thing Apple could make money off of is if, say, developers charge for iMessage stickers and Apple gets its 30% cut. Nothing else they announced had any sort of monetization component (Pay is still just about secure authentication not replacing PayPal).
    I agree with this.

    Farad Manjoo had a very good piece in the New York Times on this very issue, and I thought he was spot on: the strategy is still too Apple-device centered for it to be truly services-focused. If that's the strategy Apple has (implicitly) chosen, and that's fine; but it's vacuous to put a spin on it like "we have a services strategy".
  • Reply 12 of 13
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,922member

    And this is why I think Tim and Luca's whole pivot to services on the earnings calls is a bunch of BS. Next to nothing announced yesterday creates new monetized services. The only thing Apple could make money off of is if, say, developers charge for iMessage stickers and Apple gets its 30% cut. Nothing else they announced had any sort of monetization component (Pay is still just about secure authentication not replacing PayPal).
    I agree with this.

    Farad Manjoo had a very good piece in the New York Times on this very issue, and I thought he was spot on: the strategy is still too Apple-device centered for it to be truly services-focused. If that's the strategy Apple has (implicitly) chosen, and that's fine; but it's vacuous to put a spin on it like "we have a services strategy".
    Personally I think this whole services thing is nonsense anyway. Either Apple has to do a complete 180 and become an ad company and start charging for software again or they start nickel and diming customers by adding more features that require monthly/yearly fees. Customers aren't going to go for that because you don't pay a premium for a device to then be charged for all sorts of other things. Of course Wall Street and the tech press read all this as Apple becoming blackberry and iMessage becoming BBM. I guess we'll see who gets the last laugh.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    Something seems amiss with services in general; I don't think they were pushing services in those earning calls for nothing. It's not really a big deal (WWDC show's Apple is continuing to leap ahead of the competition in terms of making technology work for us), but a bit disappointing. For example, News, and to some extent Apple Music haven't been too successful relative to what they should be, and in both cases it seems like we're getting this year what we should've gotten in version 1.

    News: In iOS 9 I was eager to use it, but there was nothing compelling about it, and the curation just wasn't good. I'm glad they improved it and added subscriptions in iOS 10, and I plan to get some subscriptions and give it another go this year.

    Music: While I'm excited about and very eagerly awaiting the iOS 10 version, it seems like we should be getting more than a simplified, streamlined version of what we got last year. There's no expansion of Beats stations, no obvious push into Android as there should be, no addition of content as suggested by Apple's Dubset Media partnership, ..., and the biggest omission of all, lack of social. It's so incongruous with what we know about music, and with what Apple's music presentation was all about.. individual identity and expression (as was excellently conveyed in Bozoma Saint John's presentation). We live in a social-connected world now (despite what many AI members think), and Apple Music lacking a social aspect, a mechanism for self-expression, is inherently and significantly limiting. And no, messaging and emailing links to songs or isolated playlists is NOT the answer. I don't see what's so hard about allowing users to create personal profiles that they can refer people to in order to share music. They could just put a bar at the top of the For You section with almost no clutter to the new, sleek UI. Hopefully there's a bit more to Music that will be unveiled in the fall. Fingers crossed.
    edited June 2016
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