Amazon launches thinner, lighter $80 Kindle e-reader with double storage

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2016
Amazon on Wednesday announced its latest entry-level black-and-white Kindle reader priced at $79.99, featuring a more rounded design than previous models, for easy holding in one hand or at any angle.




The new Amazon Kindle is sized at 6.3 inches by 4.5 by 0.36 inches and weighs 5.7 ounces (161 grams). The device comes in black or white, and it will have 4 gigabytes of memory -- twice that of its predecessor.

Amazon is also offering free cloud storage for all digital content purchased through the online retailer.

The Kindle's high contrast touchscreen display is designed to read like paper while eliminating glare, even in direct sunlight. And, by not emitting light, the screen won't cause sleep loss by creating blue light that inhibits production of melatonin.

New, proprietary fonts are being offered to improve reading and the blacks and whites on the page will be uniform for the sake of text and image quality.




A single battery charge is touted as lasting weeks rather than hours, assuming a half hour of reading a day with the wireless off. Fully charging the device will take four hours from a computer using a USB cable. However, the device itself is fully wireless and doesn't need a computer to download content.

Reading features include better export of notes and highlights to email. A printable PDF option will be available as part of a free, over-the-air software update. To prevent distraction, the device won't accept alerts or notifications.

Bluetooth audio will be built into the device for the visually impaired to use the VoiceView screen reader without the need for an adaptor.




An updated interface and improved navigation will allow users to personalize their home screens and manage favorites, wish lists and book recommendations from friends.

In a clear bid for the Chinese market, Chinese Word Wise Hints will be available by changing the language in Word Wise settings.

At $79.99, the basic Kindle remains Amazon's most affordable e-reader. It joins the rest of the company's lineup: the $289.99 Kindle Oasis, the $199.99 Kindle Voyage, and the $119.99 Kindle Paperwhite.

"Tens of millions of readers around the world have Kindle e-readers and today, we're excited to make our most affordable Kindle even better, while keeping the same breakthrough price point," Arthur van Rest, Kindle general manager, stated in a press release. "With a thinner and lighter design, twice the memory, and all the features customers love about Kindle, it has never been a better time to be a reader."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,504member
    They've done well with this limited function reader. Keeping it thin and light makes it a great alternative to both the physical book and to a much heavier iPad just for book reading.
    icoco3jackansimike1
  • Reply 2 of 18
    irelandireland Posts: 17,685member
    The Kindle should have no frame around it. That would be beautiful.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,504member
    ireland said:
    The Kindle should have no frame around it. That would be beautiful.
    Having a frame makes it more clear for the reader where it's safe to hold the device without triggering a page turn, in my opinion.
    icoco3jackansimike1
  • Reply 4 of 18
    teejay2012teejay2012 Posts: 280member
    167 ppi vs 300 ppi of all other Kindles explains the low price. I have the Paperwhite and it is very readable.
  • Reply 5 of 18
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,504member
    167 ppi vs 300 ppi of all other Kindles explains the low price. I have the Paperwhite and it is very readable.
    Generally, anything above 150 ppi is sufficient for legibility in print, so the reduced resolution shouldn't be too bad.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    19831983 Posts: 1,201member
    Amazons e-ink Kindle is a nice little product. It still beats any tablet for the reading of books.
    jackansidasanman69
  • Reply 7 of 18
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,460member
    For all the moaning we could do about Amazon, the Kindle has been a fantastic device ever since it was first introduced.  Every person who has one I talked to loves them.  And, I love mine...
    lordjohnwhorfindasanman69mike1
  • Reply 8 of 18
    The only thing I'm sad about is that they didn't have a white Paperwhite when I ordered mine in March. Other than that, a nice update to the lineup. 
  • Reply 9 of 18
    irelandireland Posts: 17,685member
    ireland said:
    The Kindle should have no frame around it. That would be beautiful.
    Having a frame makes it more clear for the reader where it's safe to hold the device without triggering a page turn, in my opinion.
    Page turns could be gestures. Several possible alternatives. I just think no frame around the entire "page" would make for a more elegant product.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 10 of 18
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,788member
    Kindle?
    There's an app for that.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    sockrolid said:
    Kindle?
    There's an app for that.
    Funny and true, but really nothing beats the paper-like screen, super light weight and weeks-long battery life. It's inexpensive, uses up virtually no space, and holds all the books you could ever want to read. When I want to read a book, I read it on my Kindle, not my iPad.
    singularityjackansiicoco3cnocbui
  • Reply 12 of 18
    jackansijackansi Posts: 116member
    ireland said:
    Having a frame makes it more clear for the reader where it's safe to hold the device without triggering a page turn, in my opinion.
    Page turns could be gestures. Several possible alternatives. I just think no frame around the entire "page" would make for a more elegant product.
    I still have a hard time with understanding why people insist on things having no bezel/frame.  You still need somewhere to hold it without interfering with/activating the touch screen.  Waving my hand at it or even some swipe gesture to turn the page is just plain gimmicky, not useful.

    iDevices will always have nothing on the Kindle when it comes to reading for any real length of time.
    edited June 2016 icoco3mike1
  • Reply 13 of 18
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,460member
    jackansi said:
    ireland said:
    Page turns could be gestures. Several possible alternatives. I just think no frame around the entire "page" would make for a more elegant product.
    I still have a hard time with understanding why people insist on things having no bezel/frame.  You still need somewhere to hold it without interfering with/activating the touch screen.  Waving my hand at it or even some swipe gesture to turn the page is just plain gimmicky, not useful.

    iDevices will always have nothing on the Kindle when it comes to reading for any real length of time.
    Bezel/Frame = Page Margins, just like a book.

    iPhone 5s is to small and iPad to heavy, I read books on my Kindle Fire as it is nice and light.
    jackansi
  • Reply 14 of 18
    irelandireland Posts: 17,685member
    Guys, I'm not talking about iDevices re no bezel, I'm talking about Kindle specifically. Also, if you owned a Kindle you would be aware the frame is an additional margin as the on screen pages already have margins.

    I'll reaffirm, a Kindle should not have a big bezel around the screen. A deliberate click, press or swipe could be used. This is software and it can be programmed for how the user uses the device so it knows when a user wants to paginate. It's not an iPad, it's a book reader and ditching the bezel here would make sense and make for a device nicer in my view. It's a design thing.

    The idea would be to make the device look and feel more book-like. An evolution of the current design.

    Heck, I'm being voted down, I must be right.
    edited June 2016 singularity
  • Reply 15 of 18
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,947member
    sockrolid said:
    Kindle?
    There's an app for that.
    Funny and true, but really nothing beats the paper-like screen, super light weight and weeks-long battery life. It's inexpensive, uses up virtually no space, and holds all the books you could ever want to read. When I want to read a book, I read it on my Kindle, not my iPad.
    I still prefer real paper when practical, my Kindle when not. I use my iPad for news and magazines and such, not books.
  • Reply 16 of 18
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,145member
    I already have iPad and there is no reason for me to get another device just for reading a book. I prefer to keep my travel bag light, thank you. However, I do envy those e-ink tech on Kindle, they are very comfortable to read a book with. Anyone who read on iPad for extended hours understand that it can get a bit tiring - to both eyes and arms. Not so much so that a Kindle is necessary, though. On a positive note, iPad offers full color experience.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 17 of 18
    I have a paper white Kindle and love the e-ink quality for reading, but that's all I love about the Kindle. I stick mostly with reading books on my iPad for following reasons: I prefer to spend my $$ in the Apple-verse; I prefer to read books by continuous vertical scrolling instead of clicking, or flipping pages; color; library management is superior in iBooks. 
  • Reply 18 of 18
    Previous Kindle Touch (7th generation) already had 4GB of storage, as you can see here: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Kindle-6-Inch-4GB-eReader/dp/B00I15SB16?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0
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