Huawei caught using DSLR photo to promote dual-lens smartphone camera

Posted:
in iPhone
With Apple's upcoming "iPhone 7 Plus" rumored to feature a dual-camera design for better pictures, competing smartphone maker Huawei has pushed to market their own two-lens system. But in an attempt to suggest the Leica-branded lens can produce DSLR-quality images, the Chinese company actually used a picture shot with a full-fledged DSLR, not its new smartphone.


Via Android Police.


Huawei's new P9 handset is a photography-focused smartphone featuring a dual-lens 12-megapixel camera. To promote the handset, Huawei uploaded a picture to Google+, implying that the image was captured via the P9.

However, Google+ uploads include the EXIF data for each image, revealing what hardware was actually used to capture a picture. In the case of Huawei's promotional image, the photo was shot with a $4,500 Canon 5D Mk. III and EF70-200 f/2.8L IS II USM lens.

After the true source of the image was publicized, Huawei removed it from its Google+ account, and issued a statement to Android Police admitting that the picture was not taken with the P9 smartphone. Instead, Huawei said, the photo was captured while filming an advertisement for the P9.

"We recognize that we should have been clearer with the captions for this image," the company said. "It was never our intention to mislead. We apologize for this and we have removed the image."




It's widely rumored that Apple's forthcoming 5.5-inch iPhone, expected to debut in September, will also feature a dual-camera system. Claims about the new camera array date back to 2014, when it was said that Apple's implementation would somehow offer "DSLR quality imagery."

To presumably bolster its development of a dual-camera system, Apple in 2015 acquired LinX, an Israeli firm that specialized in squeezing high-definition images out of relatively small multi-lens configurations. It's believed that this year's so-called "iPhone 7 Plus" will use LinX technology and 3 gigabytes of RAM to handle much higher quality photos than ever before captured with an iPhone.

Whether Apple's implementation can rival actual DSLR cameras remains to be seen. But Huawei's advertising blunder would suggest that its P9 Leica camera is not quite at the level of an actual Leica DSLR --?or a Canon.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    And to think, this was the same company who developed the nexus 6p. Shame on you Huawei, shame on you!. What a joke of a company. Will not see any of my money ever again.
    repressthisirelandcalijbdragonlatifbpargonautjony0
  • Reply 2 of 53
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,763member
    Unfortunately, for Chinese companies, corporate ethics or governance is not in their dictionary. Steal,copy,make cheap and sell cheap, deceive, whatever methods necessary to make money.
    jackansiTurboPGTrepressthisDeelronjbdragonration allollivermacky the mackybdkennedy1002baconstang
  • Reply 3 of 53
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    I have that camera combo, and it is indeed, very good. There is no way that a smartphone is going to offer quality out of the camera that comes close to what a DSLR, or better mirrorless cameras can offer for one simple reason. Sensor size. The tiny sensors used in smartphones out of necessity, simply can't deliver anything close to the dynamic range, and low noise levels, that large sensors can, much less that of the 24x36 mm sensor of a full frame camera.

    Any claims that they can should be ignored. Smartphone cameras should be enjoyed for the quality of the imags they can take, which is pretty good as it is, and certainly better today than professional digital cameras from 15 years ago, and possibly from some slightly newer ones than that. But lens quality is obviously an issue as well, as is jpeg only files.

    Maybe, just maybe, with Apple's announcement of OS level RAW support, we MIGHT see RAW files from the built in camera finally appear for iOS devices, as they have for a number of Android devices for the last three years, or so. I really hope so, but we don't know that yet. OS level support makes it easier, but isn't necessary, and so I've always thought that Apple hasn't included it because of storage size issues. But maybe, if the rumors are true about 32GB being the new base storage size, Apple is relenting.
    edited July 2016 jackansigatorguyrepressthismike1pscooter63boltsfan17Deelronjbdragonration allolliver
  • Reply 4 of 53
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    First rule of uploading images is make sure to wipe any EXIF data which could even include GPS data. You could use just about any photo editing software - select all copy paste, save as.
    edited July 2016 xiamenbilllolliverbaconstangargonaut
  • Reply 5 of 53
    Shades of the IIRC Nokia Windows Phone video where it implied it was shot using the device, until one intrepid observer reported, that in the reflection of a pane of glass, one could see a professional industrial recording camera on a truck. 
    xiamenbillnolamacguypscooter63badmonkcalilolliverbaconstangargonaut
  • Reply 6 of 53
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    melgross said:
    ...which is pretty good as it is, and certainly better today than professional digital cameras from 15 years ago, ...
    My first professional digital camera was the Nikon D100 back in 2002. I believe I paid more than $2000 for just the body but it was a fantastic camera which made things so easy and saved us a lot of money shooting product photography. In fact just last week I had it serviced and the sensor cleaned. It came back all shrink wrapped and beautiful. Great little 6 megapixel body. Put some high quality glass on it and it is hard to beat. I've been shooting Nikon since the BW film days. Right now my primary camera is the D750 which is a full frame camera. Some say it is even better than the more expensive Nikons. I recently bought a 200-500mm lens which is really spectacular. This weekend I shot some images of hummingbirds magnified to fill up the entire frame. Those are difficult birds to capture an image of, but if you are patient, just focus on a flower and they might just fly right into your field of view.
    edited July 2016 jackansiipilyacalijbdragon
  • Reply 7 of 53
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 422member
    Interesting that the blogosphere isn't awash in the venom that would be spewed towards Apple had it been caught doing something this sleazy.
    lkrupprepressthismike1lordjohnwhorfinnolamacguybadmonkcalijbdragonration allolliver
  • Reply 8 of 53
    ceek74ceek74 Posts: 323member
    "It was never our intention to mislead.", nuff said?!
    repressthislordjohnwhorfincalijbdragonicoco3lolliverargonaut
  • Reply 9 of 53
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,805member
    igorsky said:
    Interesting that the blogosphere isn't awash in the venom that would be spewed towards Apple had it been caught doing something this sleazy.
    Had Apple done this it would have been closer to "sleazy". For a Chinese company on the other hand it's not all that unusual IMHO. All's fair in marketing seems to be the case with many of them. 
    jbdragonration almacky the mackyjony0
  • Reply 10 of 53
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,224member
    These frauds have no shame. Look at the screen image in the array of their phones pictured in this article. The gal in the orange flowing gown absolutely reflects the beta fish fin photo that Apple uses to illustrate the 6s screen, right down to the color (they probably used Pantone to clone it).

    What's puzzling is that they have all the brains and creativity they need to do original work, yet they stubbornly and continually ape Apple. Is it a national inferiority complex? Bean counters at the top? 
    caliration alargonautjony0
  • Reply 11 of 53
    zoomcryptzoomcrypt Posts: 11member
    is this a surprise? go china.
  • Reply 12 of 53
    monstrositymonstrosity Posts: 2,182member
    melgross said:
    I have that camera combo, and it is indeed, very good. There is no way that a smartphone is going to offer quality out of the camera that comes close to what a DSLR, or better mirrorless cameras can offer for one simple reason. Sensor size. The tiny sensors used in smartphones out of necessity, simply can't deliver anything close to the dynamic range, and low noise levels, that large sensors can, much less that of the 24x36 mm sensor of a full frame camera.

    Any claims that they can should be ignored. Smartphone cameras should be enjoyed for the quality of the imags they can take, which is pretty good as it is, and certainly better today than professional digital cameras from 15 years ago, and possibly from some slightly newer ones than that. But lens quality is obviously an issue as well, as is jpeg only files.

    Maybe, just maybe, with Apple's announcement of OS level RAW support, we MIGHT see RAW files from the built in camera finally appear for iOS devices, as they have for a number of Android devices for the last three years, or so. I really hope so, but we don't know that yet. OS level support makes it easier, but isn't necessary, and so I've always thought that Apple hasn't included it because of storage size issues. But maybe, if the rumors are true about 32GB being the new base storage size, Apple is relenting.
    Never say "no way"... but lets not have this discussion again :)
  • Reply 13 of 53
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,805member
    These frauds have no shame. Look at the screen image in the array of their phones pictured in this article. The gal in the orange flowing gown absolutely reflects the beta fish fin photo that Apple uses to illustrate the 6s screen, right down to the color (they probably used Pantone to clone it).
    No cloning should be needed. There's pre-built LR plugins that make it relatively simple and fast to get that similar "look". 
  • Reply 14 of 53
    ipilyaipilya Posts: 185member
    volcan said:

    My first professional digital camera was the Nikon D100 back in 2002.

    Can I give you 10 up votes? I had the D100 "back in the day" and had it coupled with that rare and discontinued 80-200 glass that is still all the rage. The results were amazing... and there is definitely not a single phone that could match let alone beat that combination. 
    dasanman69cali
  • Reply 15 of 53
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    monstrosity said:

    Never say "no way"

    You can tell right away that they used professional gear for that shot. To get a blurred background like that you need a low f-stop and a short focal length which I don't think you can duplicate with a smartphone.
    edited July 2016 dasanman69calimagman1979ration allolliverbdkennedy1002argonaut
  • Reply 16 of 53
    apres587apres587 Posts: 48member
    ceek74 said:
    "It was never our intention to mislead.", nuff said?!
    Translation: "It was never our intention to get caught."
    nolamacguyVisualSeedpscooter63calimagman1979Deelronration allollivermacky the macky
  • Reply 17 of 53
    TurboPGTTurboPGT Posts: 355member
    It's hard to stand by the notion that they intentionally tried to deceive anyone, by uploading a photo contains all EXIF data. Obviously it was a mistake / misunderstanding.
  • Reply 18 of 53
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    volcan said:
    melgross said:
    ...which is pretty good as it is, and certainly better today than professional digital cameras from 15 years ago, ...
    My first professional digital camera was the Nikon D100 back in 2002. I believe I paid more than $2000 for just the body but it was a fantastic camera which made things so easy and saved us a lot of money shooting product photography. In fact just last week I had it serviced and the sensor cleaned. It came back all shrink wrapped and beautiful. Great little 6 megapixel body. Put some high quality glass on it and it is hard to beat. I've been shooting Nikon since the BW film days. Right now my primary camera is the D750 which is a full frame camera. Some say it is even better than the more expensive Nikons. I recently bought a 200-500mm lens which is really spectacular. This weekend I shot some images of hummingbirds magnified to fill up the entire frame. Those are difficult birds to capture an image of, but if you are patient, just focus on a flower and they might just fly right into your field of view.
    Yeah, those cameras were great for their day. But as far as most specs go, the best smartphone cameras have caught up, and are definitely sharper. I still have my old 60D Canon, also a 6MP body. I made some great photos with that, and in Photoshop, with a doubling of Rez, the images looked pretty good in 11 X 17.5 as well. But, sigh, even my 6+ now takes sharper pictures, and the difference in noise and density range isn't that different.
    Deelronlolliver
  • Reply 19 of 53
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member

    melgross said:
    I have that camera combo, and it is indeed, very good. There is no way that a smartphone is going to offer quality out of the camera that comes close to what a DSLR, or better mirrorless cameras can offer for one simple reason. Sensor size. The tiny sensors used in smartphones out of necessity, simply can't deliver anything close to the dynamic range, and low noise levels, that large sensors can, much less that of the 24x36 mm sensor of a full frame camera.

    Any claims that they can should be ignored. Smartphone cameras should be enjoyed for the quality of the imags they can take, which is pretty good as it is, and certainly better today than professional digital cameras from 15 years ago, and possibly from some slightly newer ones than that. But lens quality is obviously an issue as well, as is jpeg only files.

    Maybe, just maybe, with Apple's announcement of OS level RAW support, we MIGHT see RAW files from the built in camera finally appear for iOS devices, as they have for a number of Android devices for the last three years, or so. I really hope so, but we don't know that yet. OS level support makes it easier, but isn't necessary, and so I've always thought that Apple hasn't included it because of storage size issues. But maybe, if the rumors are true about 32GB being the new base storage size, Apple is relenting.
    Never say "no way"... but lets not have this discussion again :)
    Oh please! You're right, we shouldn't have this discussion again. It's a settled issue, a small sensor will never have the quality as a larger sensor from current generations of sensors. It's pretty obvious, and isn't worthy of argument.
    ration allolliverargonaut
  • Reply 20 of 53
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,804member
    Can you imagine the furor and venom that would be spewed in Apple's direction if they did something like this, even accidentally.
    sockrolidcalimagman1979
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