Apple's iPhone seen as tipping point for OLED dominance by 2020

Posted:
in iPhone edited July 2016
With Apple rumored to be switching to OLED screens starting with the 2017 iPhone, research firm IHS believes that product's launch will serve as a game changer for OLED technology and mobile displays.


"iPhone 7" concept via Martin Hajek.


While AMOLED displays are currently less common than competing LTPS LCD and a-Si technology, IHS Markit believes that will change by 2020, at which point it predicts OLED will be the most common smartphone display.

Last year, OLED panels represented less than 20 percent of the overall market. But by 2020, IHS believes OLED will be found in nearly 40 percent of smartphones sold.

A major factor in that trend is predicted to be Apple: The company is rumored to be working on a major redesign for its iPhone next year, featuring an OLED display with components like the speaker and FaceTime camera hidden behind it.

Apple's expected entrance into the OLED market is already having a major effect on display manufacturers, who are investing in the technology and ramping up production in apparent bids to win business for the future iPhone.




IHS, too, cited Apple in its predictions, noting that "all signs" point to future iPhones boasting OLED displays. Apple currently uses OLED in one product, the Apple Watch.

"Apple's upcoming adoption of OLED displays will be a milestone for OLED in the display industry," said David Hsieh, senior director at IHS.

To date, all iPhones have featured LCD panels, due to the technology's supply flexibility, longer product life, and superior visibility in sunlight.

With OLED technology, each individual pixel is self-lit, which means "black" (unused) pixels do not require as much power as illuminated pixels. OLED panels can also be flexible, allowing for new form factors like curved screens.

The OLED screen in the Apple Watch is paired with a dark user interface, playing a key role in giving the wearable device a full day of battery life. In Apple's upcoming iOS 10 release, there has been evidence of a secret "dark mode", suggesting that Apple could be working on a new interface for a future OLED iPhone.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    singularitysirlance99staticx57dasanman69badmonk
  • Reply 2 of 22
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,788member


    "iPhone 7" concept via Martin Hajek.

    Space Black DLC coating please.
    Loving my Space Black Milanese Loop.
    badmonk
  • Reply 3 of 22
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,020member

    To date, all iPhones have featured LCD panels, due to the technology's supply flexibility, longer product life, and superior visibility in sunlight.
    I wonder what has changed.
  • Reply 4 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    crowley said:

    To date, all iPhones have featured LCD panels, due to the technology's supply flexibility, longer product life, and superior visibility in sunlight.
    I wonder what has changed.
    Thinner.
  • Reply 5 of 22
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,519member
    crowley said:

    To date, all iPhones have featured LCD panels, due to the technology's supply flexibility, longer product life, and superior visibility in sunlight.
    I wonder what has changed.
    What has changed is Samsung's and LG's achievement of competence in large-scale production, not to mention the maturation of the physics of AMOLED technology.

    Samsung will probably strain to produce enough for themselves plus Apple next year. LG is straining to enter the field the year after that.

    The same factors affected Apple's move to larger LTPS LCD screens two years ago. It's the manufacturing ecosystem that makes the rules.
  • Reply 6 of 22
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,519member

    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    Very big troll fail here. We all know the history too well for this to work. What drugs are you on?
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 7 of 22
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    flaneur said:

    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    Very big troll fail here. We all know the history too well for this to work. What drugs are you on?
    Blocked that troll long ago.  Hopefully more will do the same.
  • Reply 8 of 22
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    no matter how much it may upset you, Apple is huge. iPhone is huge. it's a giant, when it takes steps the reverberations are felt for miles. it changes industries.
  • Reply 9 of 22
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,020member
    flaneur said:
    crowley said:
    I wonder what has changed.
    What has changed is Samsung's and LG's achievement of competence in large-scale production, not to mention the maturation of the physics of AMOLED technology.

    Samsung will probably strain to produce enough for themselves plus Apple next year. LG is straining to enter the field the year after that.

    The same factors affected Apple's move to larger LTPS LCD screens two years ago. It's the manufacturing ecosystem that makes the rules.
    So only the first of those three factors has changed then?  The product life is still shorter, and visibility in sublight is still worse?  What are the advantages, apart from deeper blacks and colours that pop more?
    edited July 2016
  • Reply 10 of 22
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,519member
    crowley said:
    flaneur said:
    What has changed is Samsung's and LG's achievement of competence in large-scale production, not to mention the maturation of the physics of AMOLED technology.

    Samsung will probably strain to produce enough for themselves plus Apple next year. LG is straining to enter the field the year after that.

    The same factors affected Apple's move to larger LTPS LCD screens two years ago. It's the manufacturing ecosystem that makes the rules.
    So only the first of those three factors has changed then?  The product life is still shorter, and visibility in sublight is still worse?  What are the advantages, apart from deeper blacks and colours that pop more?
    Damned if I know. Along with what DisplayMate is saying lately about the Galaxies, I just figure that Apple has been testing them to death to ensure the tradeoffs are net gains for the user.

    But then I have faith that the old-school ethics still prevail at Apple, starting with the chief metal-pusher/designer.
  • Reply 11 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    no matter how much it may upset you, Apple is huge. iPhone is huge. it's a giant, when it takes steps the reverberations are felt for miles. it changes industries.
    Your last sentence proves my point as does the idiocy spouted by the IHS analyst.  At least 300 phones have been on the market with OLED screens.  All of Samsung's Galaxy products have OLED screens along with  their Alpha models and even their J series, as far as I can tell.  Given the number of phones Samsung sells, those would likely make up the majority of their phone sales, which means the volume of phones on the market with OLED screens may already match Apple's output, but you are saying the industry will only have been changed because Apple start using them.  As I said - and so it begins - the re-writing of history.  Samsung changed this aspect of the industry, not Apple.
    singularity
  • Reply 12 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    crowley said:
    flaneur said:
    What has changed is Samsung's and LG's achievement of competence in large-scale production, not to mention the maturation of the physics of AMOLED technology.

    Samsung will probably strain to produce enough for themselves plus Apple next year. LG is straining to enter the field the year after that.

    The same factors affected Apple's move to larger LTPS LCD screens two years ago. It's the manufacturing ecosystem that makes the rules.
    So only the first of those three factors has changed then?  The product life is still shorter, and visibility in sublight is still worse?  What are the advantages, apart from deeper blacks and colours that pop more?
    I have been using an AMOLED screened phone for 6 years and can detect no deterioration, and there must have been about 6-7 generations of improvement since it was made.  How long a product life do you want?

    Sunlight visibility does not appear to be worse FF to 2:00:



  • Reply 13 of 22
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,020member
    cnocbui said:
    crowley said:
    So only the first of those three factors has changed then?  The product life is still shorter, and visibility in sublight is still worse?  What are the advantages, apart from deeper blacks and colours that pop more?
    I have been using an AMOLED screened phone for 6 years and can detect no deterioration, and there must have been about 6-7 generations of improvement since it was made.  How long a product life do you want?
    I don't know, I'm just wondering what has changed.  The article claimed less product life and visibility in sunlight, but didn't mention anything about any improvements.
  • Reply 14 of 22
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    flaneur said:

    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    Very big troll fail here. We all know the history too well for this to work. What drugs are you on?
    Who is we, and when did they appoint you to speak for them? 
    singularity
  • Reply 15 of 22
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,519member
    flaneur said:

    Very big troll fail here. We all know the history too well for this to work. What drugs are you on?
    Who is we, and when did they appoint you to speak for them? 
    "We" is those who pay attention and acknowledge the facts honestly. I wasn't necessarily speaking for you, Mr. Boldface.
  • Reply 16 of 22
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    flaneur said:
    Who is we, and when did they appoint you to speak for them? 
    "We" is those who pay attention and acknowledge the facts honestly. I wasn't necessarily speaking for you, Mr. Boldface.
    That's a very short list. Using bold is the only way I can keep the cursor from jumping into the previous post and staying there. 
  • Reply 17 of 22
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    crowley said:
    cnocbui said:
    I have been using an AMOLED screened phone for 6 years and can detect no deterioration, and there must have been about 6-7 generations of improvement since it was made.  How long a product life do you want?
    I don't know, I'm just wondering what has changed.  The article claimed less product life and visibility in sunlight, but didn't mention anything about any improvements.

  • Reply 18 of 22
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,178member
    MicroLED please! Oh and no counting the sub pixels twice to fake higher resolution.

    Maybe Apple OLED will have all of its sub pixels unlike the current charlatan OLED.
  • Reply 19 of 22
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,519member
    flaneur said:
    "We" is those who pay attention and acknowledge the facts honestly. I wasn't necessarily speaking for you, Mr. Boldface.
    That's a very short list. Using bold is the only way I can keep the cursor from jumping into the previous post and staying there. 
    "To be honest, as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.” — Hamlet. 

    Apologies, and congrats for finding a bold workaround.
  • Reply 20 of 22
    cnocbui said:
    And so it begins.  There were no OLED screens before Apple had the great idea.  OLED screens in phones only became possible because of secret research and tech developed exclusively by Apple in their labs.  Samsung only thought to put OLED panels in a small number of their phones because they heard a rumour Apple were going to do so, but of course they did so in haste and without Apple's attention to detail so their screens are notably inferior to the ones Apple uses.
    cnocbui said:
    no matter how much it may upset you, Apple is huge. iPhone is huge. it's a giant, when it takes steps the reverberations are felt for miles. it changes industries.
    Your last sentence proves my point as does the idiocy spouted by the IHS analyst.  At least 300 phones have been on the market with OLED screens.  All of Samsung's Galaxy products have OLED screens along with  their Alpha models and even their J series, as far as I can tell.  Given the number of phones Samsung sells, those would likely make up the majority of their phone sales, which means the volume of phones on the market with OLED screens may already match Apple's output, but you are saying the industry will only have been changed because Apple start using them.  As I said - and so it begins - the re-writing of history.  Samsung changed this aspect of the industry, not Apple.

    Dude, quit contradicting yourself! ADHD?
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