iPhone 7 & 7 Plus have bigger batteries than iPhone 6s line, specs show

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2016
The 4.7-inch iPhone 7 features a 1,960 milliamp-hour battery, while the 5.5-inch iPhone 7 Plus includes a 2,900 milliamp-hour supply -- both significant increases over their predecessors, a report noted on Monday.




The specifications were published by Chinese certification agency TENAA, according to iPhone7.nl. Apple avoids marketing hard data on the batteries in its mobile devices, preferring instead to concentrate on how many hours a product should run under specific activities.

The iPhone 6s and 6s Plus by contrast feature 1,715 and 2,750 milliamp-hour batteries.

Longevity has been a regular complaint about iPhones and smartphones in general, since few are designed to last more than a day in regular usage. The iPhone 6s often needs to be charged twice a day, once mid-day and again overnight. The 6s Plus can run for over 24 hours under normal conditions.




At last Wednesday's press event, Apple promised that its new iPhones have the "longest battery life ever in an iPhone," thanks partly to quad-core A10 processors. Two low-power cores take over on less intense tasks, reducing power consumption.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    bigger? (volume?)
    or higher capacity? (more electrons?)
    Soli
  • Reply 2 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,706member
    Apple avoids marketing hard data on the batteries in its mobile devices, preferring instead to concentrate on how many hours a product should run under specific activities.

    The iPhone 6s and 6s Plus by contrast feature 1,715 and 2,750 milliamp-hour batteries.

    Longevity has been a regular complaint about iPhones and smartphones in general, since few are designed to last more than a day in regular usage. The iPhone 6s often needs to be charged twice a day, once mid-day and again overnight. The 6s Plus can run for over 24 hours under normal conditions.
    1. You don’t say. What’s more important to the consumer? Knowing how long their phone will last or how many milliamp-hours the battery has? Screw the spec monkeys who live by specs alone and don’t take into account all the software and hardware tweaks that enhance battery performance and longevity. To the spec monkeys a bigger battery must mean more time between charges, right? Bullshit. 2. Totally asinine statement to make. It all depends on the individual. I start out with a full charge in the morning and have at least 30% charge left when I retire for the night. I use my iPhone 6 all day long for phone calls, texts, web browsing, news, Apple Music. What I don’t do is watch full length HD movies and I stay well within my data plan to boot. Users that watch movies all day long and then complain about battery life are the outliers, not the norm. Also, the troll meme out there that says iPhone battery life sucks compared to Android phones is blatantly, trollingly wrong. Even Leo LaPorte and Andy Ihnatko over at MacBash Weekly admit iPhone battery life is excellent.
    baconstangSolilmagoomagman1979mike1watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 20
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    mrboba1watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 20
    For me, the biggest difference in battery usage is whether I have wifi enabled or not. Without wifi enabled, I can run all day on my overnight charge. With wifi enabled, the burn rate is often over 10% per hour.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    We don't yet know, but I suspect that the fast-charging circuitry played a part in the faulty batteries. They received too much juice, too quickly, and overheated.

     timborama said:
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.

    Samsung does make several parts used in iPhones, but what suggests that Apple uses Samsung-made batteries? Here's an article on the iPhone 6 battery situation, and there's no mention of Samsung in the supplier list.

    http://www.cultofmac.com/287472/iphone-6-battery-issues-solved/
    edited September 2016 magman1979jony0
  • Reply 7 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,706member
    timborama said:
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.
    Err, no they do not.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/tech-news/Samsung-turns-to-Apple-supplier-for-Note-7-batteries/articleshow/54295532.cms

    In fact Samsung is turning to Apple’s main battery supplier ATL and has ordered four million batteries as replacements for their exploding Galaxy Note 7. Samsung got 70% of its batteries from its own subsidiary prior to the explosions and fires starting. Going forward it will exclusively use ATL batteries in the Note 7. According to the article it all depends on how well the iPhone 7 sells which might cause supply problems for Samsung. So if the iPhone 7 sells well it may take longer to get that Note 7 replacement. How amazingly ironic is that?! I can barely contain myself from busting a gut laughing. Big iPhone 7 demand means Samsung Note 7 in short supply.
    edited September 2016 lmagoomagman1979brakkenwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 8 of 20
    Be interested to see the ifixit teardown to see how internal space is allocated as the iPhone 6 had 2915 mAh. Guessing the deletion of the analog out is countered by the advent of 3D Touch and (for the 7) the inclusion of the Taptic Engine and stereo speakers?
  • Reply 9 of 20
    lkrupp said:
    Apple avoids marketing hard data on the batteries in its mobile devices, preferring instead to concentrate on how many hours a product should run under specific activities.

    The iPhone 6s and 6s Plus by contrast feature 1,715 and 2,750 milliamp-hour batteries.

    Longevity has been a regular complaint about iPhones and smartphones in general, since few are designed to last more than a day in regular usage. The iPhone 6s often needs to be charged twice a day, once mid-day and again overnight. The 6s Plus can run for over 24 hours under normal conditions.
    1. You don’t say. What’s more important to the consumer? Knowing how long their phone will last or how many milliamp-hours the battery has? Screw the spec monkeys who live by specs alone and don’t take into account all the software and hardware tweaks that enhance battery performance and longevity. To the spec monkeys a bigger battery must mean more time between charges, right? Bullshit. 2. Totally asinine statement to make. It all depends on the individual. I start out with a full charge in the morning and have at least 30% charge left when I retire for the night. I use my iPhone 6 all day long for phone calls, texts, web browsing, news, Apple Music. What I don’t do is watch full length HD movies and I stay well within my data plan to boot. Users that watch movies all day long and then complain about battery life are the outliers, not the norm. Also, the troll meme out there that says iPhone battery life sucks compared to Android phones is blatantly, trollingly wrong. Even Leo LaPorte and Andy Ihnatko over at MacBash Weekly admit iPhone battery life is excellent.
    And what's a milliamp-hour again ? ;)
  • Reply 10 of 20
    Samsung only provides the a series chips and that depends on the year. Samsung will provide some of the oled screens when Apple moves away from led...  Apple is always looking to diversify there supply chain and minimize there reliance on Samsung. So, as far as I am aware Samsung supplies  no other parts in apples supply chain 
  • Reply 11 of 20
    timborama said:
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.
    Not sure they do, but battery life in iOS devices is a function of substantially more than just the hardware and the specs.
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,107member
    timborama said:
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.

    Uh, no they don't. I thought your post was pretty moronic and ignorant, then I checked your posting history and realized you're nothing but a mindless troll with nothing of worth or of truth to contribute. 
    nolamacguymagman1979tordenskjoldlkruppbrakkenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    212Tam said:
    Be interested to see the ifixit teardown to see how internal space is allocated as the iPhone 6 had 2915 mAh. Guessing the deletion of the analog out is countered by the advent of 3D Touch and (for the 7) the inclusion of the Taptic Engine and stereo speakers?
    http://www.patentlyapple.com/.a/6a0120a5580826970c01b8d21b5236970c-pi Be more interested in the series 2 teardown, I think they completely redesigned the internal housing, can't wait
    212Tam
  • Reply 14 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,706member
    rcarlton said:
    For me, the biggest difference in battery usage is whether I have wifi enabled or not. Without wifi enabled, I can run all day on my overnight charge. With wifi enabled, the burn rate is often over 10% per hour.
    And with WiFi enabled I don’t notice ANY decrease in battery life, let a lone a 10% per hour hit. That sounds like nonsense to me.
    nolamacguymagman1979tordenskjold[Deleted User]watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 20
    The iPhone 6s often needs to be charged twice a day, once mid-day and again overnight. 
    No, it doesn't. My iPhone 6s comes off the charger at 7:00 AM and goes back on around 11 PM, usually right at around 30% battery.
    lkruppwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,820member
    TurboPGT said:
    The iPhone 6s often needs to be charged twice a day, once mid-day and again overnight. 
    No, it doesn't. My iPhone 6s comes off the charger at 7:00 AM and goes back on around 11 PM, usually right at around 30% battery.
    Agreed. Can't imagine what I would have to do to charge it twice a day. I use it for work e-mail, calls bazillions of messages and some browsing and game playing. I have a well-maintained battery in my 6 that lasts me all day and I wind up turning on the flashlight or playing a game to drain it below 20% to charge overnight.

    TurboPGT
  • Reply 17 of 20
    holyone said:
    212Tam said:
    Be interested to see the ifixit teardown to see how internal space is allocated as the iPhone 6 had 2915 mAh. Guessing the deletion of the analog out is countered by the advent of 3D Touch and (for the 7) the inclusion of the Taptic Engine and stereo speakers?
    http://www.patentlyapple.com/.a/6a0120a5580826970c01b8d21b5236970c-pi Be more interested in the series 2 teardown, I think they completely redesigned the internal housing, can't wait
    Same battery life claims for the Series 2 as the original (OG?) Apple Watches? Think the Series 2 is ever so slightly thicker and heavier?
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 18 of 20
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    timborama said:
    tzeshan said:
    Great!  The 7 Plus is different from the batteries used in the exploding Samsung Note 7 phones.  
    How do you know?  Samsung makes them for Apple.
    I read a few days ago, Apple said its battery is different from Samsung Note 7.  I have a theory why Samsung Note 7 keeps exploding.  1. Samsung uses huge battery for Note 7 to support its bigger screen pixels.  2. Samsung claims its battery can be charged faster.  To charge a huge battery faster, the current is very high.  This causes internal heating.  If some battery is manufactured with some defect, the heating causes explosion. For the well being of consumers Samsung should obsolete the Note 7 model. 
    brakkenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 20
    Apple is impressive, and becomes more so each year. The other quad-cores look like diesel cars next to a Tesla.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 20
    rcarlton said:
    For me, the biggest difference in battery usage is whether I have wifi enabled or not. Without wifi enabled, I can run all day on my overnight charge. With wifi enabled, the burn rate is often over 10% per hour.
    wtf, I barely burn 10% per hour when I'm using my 6S for sat-nav; gps, bluetooth and 3g/4g searching constantly.
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