Health insurer Aetna to offer customer & employee discounts on Apple Watch

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited September 2018
Aetna will be giving both its workers and some customers discounts on the Apple Watch, the U.S. health insurance giant said on Tuesday in a joint announcement with Apple.




The company's own workforce of nearly 50,000 people will be eligible to get Watches for free. Bloomberg reported that businesses contracting with Aetna will have to decide on their own whether to adopt the wearable, and if so, how it'll be subsidized.

To this Aetna added that it's currently developing apps for Apple products that will serve a number of purposes, from reminding people to take medicines through ordering refills, checking insurance benefits, and paying bills via the Wallet app. It's not clear if that will include Apple Pay, but in any case, the new apps should be ready sometime in 2017.

Apple is likely to benefit not just from immediate sales but further tying people into its ecosystem, possible sales to other insurers, and carving out a bigger niche in the corporate fitness tracker market.

That space has so far been controlled by Fitbit, which for three years has been selling trackers to businesses wanting to cut down on insurance costs by encouraging more exercise. Aetna in fact claimed that it's the first major U.S. healthcare firm to subsidize most or all of the Watch's cost.

Apple just recently launched the Series 2, an upgrade of the Watch with waterproofing and built-in GPS. Series 1 models are also available, simply upgrading the original Watch with a faster processor.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,549member
    It's not really free, is it? I'm under the impression it's a $130 credit toward an Apple Watch, plus a $200 "wellness reimbursement," for a total of $330. The $200 can be used toward many other devices, and they've had that for at least a couple years now.
  • Reply 2 of 36
    One thing that would be good (but also scary), would be to provide the Watch free or discounted, and nice discounts to people who keep up with daily exercising, standing, and steps through the activity app of the Apple Watch.  That way people can stay healthy, save money, and in theory, save the insurer money since someone who exercises regularly probably has statistically less claims in their lifetime.  But I also foresee the privacy issues with sending your personal data to your health insurer and the downsides to the unfairness of people who can't exercise having to pay "higher" rates.
    edited September 2016 caliSpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 36
    And this is how you know Apple Watch will have a real impact on peoples health. If there's one group of people who run the numbers on everything to determine risks and benefits it would be insurance companies. They're betting that even the small things that could be done on an Apple Watch (medication reminders or tracking movement) can add up to make a meaningful impact both one peoples health and on their bottom lines.
    watto_cobrapalomine
  • Reply 4 of 36
    Since my girlfriend started working at Apple I'll finally get one since she gets 50% of plus an additional 25% off for being a hero product. Going to be hard to not have my Citizen Eco-Drive but I'll at least try it for the price now. 
  • Reply 5 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,549member
    Since my girlfriend started working at Apple I'll finally get one since she gets 50% of plus an additional 25% off for being a hero product. Going to be hard to not have my Citizen Eco-Drive but I'll at least try it for the price now. 
    Hero product?
  • Reply 6 of 36
    mcarlingmcarling Posts: 1,106member
    It might be worthwhile to switch to Aetna for health insurance.
    netroxwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 36
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Awesome news!!
    albegarcwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 36
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,820member
    One thing that would be good (but also scary), would be to provide the Watch free or discounted, and nice discounts to people who keep up with daily exercising, standing, and steps through the activity app of the Apple Watch.  That way people can stay healthy, save money, and in theory, save the insurer money since someone who exercises regularly probably has statistically less claims in their lifetime.  But I also foresee the privacy issues with sending your personal data to your health insurer and the downsides to the unfairness of people who can't exercise having to pay "higher" rates.
    That's the healthcare equivalent of those OBD devices the car insurance companies were trying to get you to use and would ostensibly get you a discount. In reality, it is a way to track your driving habits and adjust your rates or drop you all together. No thanks.
    tomkarlboopthesnoot
  • Reply 9 of 36
    sog35 said:
    And this is how you know Apple Watch will have a real impact on peoples health. If there's one group of people who run the numbers on everything to determine risks and benefits it would be insurance companies. They're betting that even the small things that could be done on an Apple Watch (medication reminders or tracking movement) can add up to make a meaningful impact both one peoples health and on their bottom lines.
    yup

    tens of thousands of people get seriously ill or die from forgetting to take their medication.

    That feature plus the SOS emergency feature is enough that any elderly person should have an Apple watch
    That elderly person is still going to have to remember to charge the AppleWatch every night which might be a problem for some if they can't remember to take their medication. Don't think this subsidy program is going to dispel any doubts by Wall Street how the AppleWatch is a failure. This program isn't going to mean anything for a product they've already determined in their minds as being useless.
    cali
  • Reply 10 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,549member
    sog35 said:
    And this is how you know Apple Watch will have a real impact on peoples health. If there's one group of people who run the numbers on everything to determine risks and benefits it would be insurance companies. They're betting that even the small things that could be done on an Apple Watch (medication reminders or tracking movement) can add up to make a meaningful impact both one peoples health and on their bottom lines.
    yup

    tens of thousands of people get seriously ill or die from forgetting to take their medication.

    That feature plus the SOS emergency feature is enough that any elderly person should have an Apple watch
    That elderly person is still going to have to remember to charge the AppleWatch every night which might be a problem for some if they can't remember to take their medication. Don't think this subsidy program is going to dispel any doubts by Wall Street how the AppleWatch is a failure. This program isn't going to mean anything for a product they've already determined in their minds as being useless.
    Do you think people that forget to take a medication are also not using an iPhone or iPad because they forget to charge them? While memory loss can be encompassing, I don't see the same relation you do. And with an Apple Watch you take it off and put it on the charger at night as a two part process. If your assumption is correct it would be people to a lesser degree forgetting to take it off at night and to a greater degree forgetting to put it on in the morning.
    nolamacguybrucemc
  • Reply 11 of 36
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,411member
    Soli said:
    It's not really free, is it? I'm under the impression it's a $130 credit toward an Apple Watch, plus a $200 "wellness reimbursement," for a total of $330. The $200 can be used toward many other devices, and they've had that for at least a couple years now.
    This is more in line with later clarifications of the program.  And the $200 can also be used for other fitness products, like gym memberships, not just "devices".
    It would be interesting to know how much of the $130 credit Aetna is subsiding, or if it sort of represents a "watch at cost" contribution by Apple.
    It would also be interesting to know which company made the first suggestion in initiating the program...it certainly makes sense for a health insurance company to seek to reduce its expenditures by encouraging employee and member health.  It also makes sense for Apple to want to get thousands of watches out there, visible to a public which,
    if Bloomberg is correct, is still lukewarm on the product.
    If I were a contributor here, who felt comfortable unreservedly raving about everything Apple (not referring to you, Soli), I might not mention that, despite living in a small city area of about 250,000 people, fairly close to greater LA, the only Watches I've seen in the wild, even now, are the two on my daughters' wrists.  
    So, marvelous, but not ubiquitous.
    edited September 2016 Soli
  • Reply 12 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,549member
     Series 1 models are also available, simply upgrading the original Watch with a faster processor.
    ???
    The original Apple Watch from last year should be referred to as Series 0. As of about 2 weeks ago, there's now Series 1 which is essentially the original Apple Watch with the updated SIP, and the Series 2 model with the new bigger casing with GPS and waterproofing features.
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 13 of 36
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,411member
    Soli said:
    Since my girlfriend started working at Apple I'll finally get one since she gets 50% of plus an additional 25% off for being a hero product. Going to be hard to not have my Citizen Eco-Drive but I'll at least try it for the price now. 
    Hero product?
    I know this is really dated, but I wonder if it's like this?
    oops, sorry, apparently not a good link anymore - the idea was that its a product - as iPod's or iPad's were once,
    which a company is hoping will have a halo effect on its other products, or its industry, generally...but you've probably already figured that out...
    edited September 2016
  • Reply 14 of 36
    mike1 said:
    One thing that would be good (but also scary), would be to provide the Watch free or discounted, and nice discounts to people who keep up with daily exercising, standing, and steps through the activity app of the Apple Watch.  That way people can stay healthy, save money, and in theory, save the insurer money since someone who exercises regularly probably has statistically less claims in their lifetime.  But I also foresee the privacy issues with sending your personal data to your health insurer and the downsides to the unfairness of people who can't exercise having to pay "higher" rates.
    That's the healthcare equivalent of those OBD devices the car insurance companies were trying to get you to use and would ostensibly get you a discount. In reality, it is a way to track your driving habits and adjust your rates or drop you all together. No thanks.
    Nice try Mike.
  • Reply 15 of 36
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,706member
    sog35 said:
    but, but, but, but, the Appple Watch is a flop........

    but, but, but, but, the iPhone 7 isn't selling......

    but, but, but, but, the Note 7 is the best.........

    Feel so sorry for pathetic Apple trolls.

    Its too the point the only thing they can say is the iPhone sucks cause they can't listen to music with their $2 headphones and charge at the same time. HA.
    I think the trolls have quite enough egg on their faces to deal with. Time to let up a little on them. They have feelings too you know. It hurts to be proven wrong all the time and laughed at.
    albegarcentropyscaliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 36
    Just another way to steal and use your personal data against you. It's no different than a monitoring device designed to have the insurance companies make more money off of you. Since they couldn't knowingly get you to agree to have sensors implanted and cameras up your butt, this was the best alternative. Go ahead and sell your soul to Aetna for $130 subsidy.
  • Reply 17 of 36
    Now it's just starting to get interesting.
    kudu
  • Reply 18 of 36
    tommikele said:
    Just another way to steal and use your personal data against you. It's no different than a monitoring device designed to have the insurance companies make more money off of you. Since they couldn't knowingly get you to agree to have sensors implanted and cameras up your butt, this was the best alternative. Go ahead and sell your soul to Aetna for $130 subsidy.
    Now we see you and mike1 are obviously the same person.  Trolls are really desperate (and not very bright) these days.
    Solicaliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 36
    sog35 said:
    And this is how you know Apple Watch will have a real impact on peoples health. If there's one group of people who run the numbers on everything to determine risks and benefits it would be insurance companies. They're betting that even the small things that could be done on an Apple Watch (medication reminders or tracking movement) can add up to make a meaningful impact both one peoples health and on their bottom lines.
    yup

    tens of thousands of people get seriously ill or die from forgetting to take their medication.

    That feature plus the SOS emergency feature is enough that any elderly person should have an Apple watch
    That elderly person is still going to have to remember to charge the AppleWatch every night which might be a problem for some if they can't remember to take their medication. Don't think this subsidy program is going to dispel any doubts by Wall Street how the AppleWatch is a failure. This program isn't going to mean anything for a product they've already determined in their minds as being useless.
    why wouldn't your pretend elderly person remember to charge their pretend watch when then can remember to charge their pretend phone? you know, the device it's an accessory to and dependent on?

    daily charging isn't a problem. let it go. 
    ronnSoliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 36
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,647member
    Imagine if the watch was successful. 
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