Three more lawfirms join class action over 'touch disease' affecting iPhone 6

Posted:
in iPhone
An additional three lawfirms are now participating in a class action suit first launched in August, which accused Apple of failing to acknowledge or do free repairs for a so-called "touch disease" affecting some owners of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.









The case has also picked up several new plaintiffs in the process, laywer Richard McCune told Motherboard. Almost 10,000 people have contacted his firm -- McCuneWright -- looking to participate in the suit, which is being handled through the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.



The scope of the action could expand even further, since in a separate but related lawsuit in Utah, Apple filed for not just "an extension of time to respond to the Complaint," but a merger with the California case.



People affected by the "touch disease" have found their iPhones developing flickering gray bands and/or a gradual reduction in touch sensitivity. This could be linked to a lack of structural reinforcement, allowing touch controller chips to come loose from the logic board even under normal bending. One of the key improvements of the iPhone 6s was the use of 7000-series aluminum, drastically reducing the phone's tendency to bend.



A number of current and former Genius technicians informed Motherboard that Apple is aware of the problem and even using an official retail protocol, despite the fact that it's forcing customers to pay for new or refurbished iPhones. The refurbished phones can potentially suffer the exact same problems as replaced ones.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 37
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,788member
    ... which accused Apple of failing to acknowledge or do free repairs for a so-called "touch disease" affecting some owners of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.
    99 problems and a flaming smartphone ain't one.
    lollivercalinolamacguycornchipwatto_cobraquadra 610mobiuslostkiwidiplicationSpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 37
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,098member
    Interesting how quickly this alleged flaw has been publicly diagnosed and presented as fact by people and companies who have no direct knowledge of how any of it works or happens. It’s all theories. It’s sort of like the lawsuits alleging talcum powder causes ovarian cancer. Juries are finding for the plaintiffs even though there is no scientific evidence that it does.
    watto_cobradiplication
  • Reply 3 of 37
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    How many law firms filing suit against Samsung for injuries/damage done by Galaxy phones and their refusal to acknowledge it?
    lollivercornchipwatto_cobralostkiwijony0
  • Reply 4 of 37
    If the phone is under warranty, Apple fixes it, right?  I understand it sucks if your expensive phone stops working but they don't need to be engineered to last forever and Apple certainly doesn't promise that it will.  They promise it will work for 1 year.  You can get them to extend that promise by buying AppleCare. Even if it is a design flaw, WTH?

     It isn't just about the phone when a person gets the phone replaced and then the replacement also exhibits the same problem.  Sorry but you need to buy lottery tickets or something because you've got a way with making unlikely things happen.  I know a lot of people with iPhone 6 and 6s series phones and I've never seen this issue.  I've replaced plenty of cracked screens so it's not like they treat with the most care or never have issues. This is BS.
    edited October 2016 cornchipwatto_cobradiplication
  • Reply 5 of 37
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    sog35 said:
    This is total and utter BS.

    Bottom line is these screens are 'failing' because these idiots have sat on their phones for years. Or course the internals will get damage.

    AppleInsider needs to stop giving these baseless lawsuit press.

    The REAL story is the Samsung phones killing people.
    So how do you explain it happening to refurbished iPhones almost immediately? 
    singularity
  • Reply 6 of 37
    sog35 said:
    This is total and utter BS.

    Bottom line is these screens are 'failing' because these idiots have sat on their phones for years. Or course the internals will get damage.

    AppleInsider needs to stop giving these baseless lawsuit press.

    The REAL story is the Samsung phones killing people.
    People who have sat on their phones? Wtf are you talking about?
    boredumb
  • Reply 7 of 37

    williamh said:
    If the phone is under warranty, Apple fixes it, right?  I understand it sucks if your expensive phone stops working but they don't need to be engineered to last forever and Apple certainly doesn't promise that it will.  They promise it will work for 1 year.  You can get them to extend that promise by buying AppleCare. Even if it is a design flaw, WTH?

     It isn't just about the phone when a person gets the phone replaced and then the replacement also exhibits the same problem.  Sorry but you need to buy lottery tickets or something because you've got a way with making unlikely things happen.  I know a lot of people with iPhone 6 and 6s series phones and I've never seen this issue.  I've replaced plenty of cracked screens so it's not like they treat with the most care or never have issues. This is BS.
    It's obviously not BS to those who have the issue. Apple should just replace the phone for affected customers and be done with it. One reason we pay a premium for Apple products is the customer service.
    Habi_tweetsingularityRoger_FingasGeorgeBMacboredumbdasanman69lostkiwi
  • Reply 8 of 37
    My iPhone 6+ developed the IC touch problem starting when about 18 months in service and gradually became worse until it completely failed at the 20 month point.  The Genius Bar tech diagnosed, and acknowledged, the problem.  Apple replaced the phone for $347.

    Folks, it's not BS and it's not a matter of sitting on it or being an idiot.   As a 81 year old retired telecom executive, my phone receives good care and is not carried in my rear pocket.  Believe me, the "touch disease" is real.   IMO the argument is whether or not Apple has a design weakness and knowingly sold defective phones.   The warranty is what it is -- one year unless extended.  That was known when we bought.  

    Regardless, I've been an Apple product user for 34 years and am not about to jump over to Samsung!  
    cornchippaxmangatorguyRoger_FingasGeorgeBMacboredumblostkiwiddawson100MichaelJTimko
  • Reply 9 of 37
    doggonedoggone Posts: 182member
    With AppleCare Plus shouldn't the issue be covered under the 2 year warranty?
    If you do not buy the extra warranty stuff like this can happen.
    I've had Apple replace stuff for free even when they did not have to.
    Phone issues typically get a replacement without any charge.  But this was with AppleCare Plus.  It is definetely worth it for the peace of mind during the 2 years that most people use their phones.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 37
    These few examples have each looked like something that happens after dropping your phone one too many times. 

    I hope Apple receives an inconvenience fee for putting up with frivolous lawsuits. 

    There re is no "touch disease." But there is a such thing as lying and cheating. 

    If it was a real issue, there would have been free replacements. There's a reason there hasn't been. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 37
    My iPhone 6+ developed the IC touch problem starting when about 18 months in service and gradually became worse until it completely failed at the 20 month point.  The Genius Bar tech diagnosed, and acknowledged, the problem.  Apple replaced the phone for $347.

    Folks, it's not BS and it's not a matter of sitting on it or being an idiot.   As a 81 year old retired telecom executive, my phone receives good care and is not carried in my rear pocket.  Believe me, the "touch disease" is real.   IMO the argument is whether or not Apple has a design weakness and knowingly sold defective phones.   The warranty is what it is -- one year unless extended.  That was known when we bought.  

    Regardless, I've been an Apple product user for 34 years and am not about to jump over to Samsung!  
    Interesting first ever AI post...

    ...riiiiiight...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 37
    I think the issue is that Apple makes very slim phones (really, almost anything they make is 'slim')... and some people put them in their back pocket... and sit on them.
    The thin phones bend under the person's weight and break solder connections, and in some cases produce 'touch disease' or other bend-related problems.
    A certain percentage of pocket-challenged people will sit on their too-delicate phones and break them.

    I think one solution is for Apple to build thicker, sturdier phones... with larger batteries... that will last longer between charging and also will not bend nor short circuit.

    edited October 2016
  • Reply 13 of 37
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,595member
    These few examples have each looked like something that happens after dropping your phone one too many times. 

    I hope Apple receives an inconvenience fee for putting up with frivolous lawsuits. 

    There re is no "touch disease." But there is a such thing as lying and cheating. 

    If it was a real issue, there would have been free replacements. There's a reason there hasn't been. 
    Your trust in Apple is admirable but why would so many people lie about the very same thing? There have been cases where Apple has offered extended warranties for hardware issues. I can guarantee you that before those replacements or repairs were offered there were many disgruntled customers cursing Apple. 
    boredumblostkiwi
  • Reply 14 of 37
    stevenoz said:
    I think the issue is that Apple makes very slim phones (really, almost anything they make is 'slim')... and some people put them in their back pocket... and sit on them.
    The thin phones bend under the person's weight and break solder connections, and in some cases produce 'touch disease' or other bend-related problems.
    A certain percentage of pocket-challenged people will sit on their too-delicate phones and break them.

    I think one solution is for Apple to build thicker, sturdier phones... with larger batteries... that will last longer between charging and also will not bend nor short circuit.

    You sit on it wrong!
  • Reply 15 of 37

    paxman said:
    These few examples have each looked like something that happens after dropping your phone one too many times. 

    I hope Apple receives an inconvenience fee for putting up with frivolous lawsuits. 

    There re is no "touch disease." But there is a such thing as lying and cheating. 

    If it was a real issue, there would have been free replacements. There's a reason there hasn't been. 
    Your trust in Apple is admirable but why would so many people lie about the very same thing? There have been cases where Apple has offered extended warranties for hardware issues. I can guarantee you that before those replacements or repairs were offered there were many disgruntled customers cursing Apple. 
    In Europe standard warranty is two years. Looking at how expensive an Apple product is I find it unbelievable that Apple only offers one year warranty in the US. Like they don't believe in their own product. 
    tokyojimuHabi_tweetsingularityGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 16 of 37
    This guy is quite vocal, but from a technical expertise standpoint I trust him: its about the underfill.  









    blitz1GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 17 of 37
    In Europe standard warranty is two years. 
    Yes - and this is augmented by country-specific consumer laws which Apple explicitly acknowledges; here's the UK situation:

    http://www.apple.com/uk/legal/statutory-warranty/

    and the general Consumer Law Rights page from Apple:

    https://www.apple.com/legal/warranty/statutoryrights.html

    Perhaps the US has some work to do.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 18 of 37

    Perhaps the US has some work to do.
    The US has lots to do w.r.t Consumer Protection when compared to other parts of the world.
    I just had a TV replaced after 3+ years because of a manufacturing defect that the maker knew about but did not issue a recall.

  • Reply 19 of 37
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 20 of 37
    dklebedev said:
    Y'all can argue, but this ain't going anywhere except lawyers pockets. Apple sold 230 million iPhone 6, right? Take 10000 plaintiffs and multiply by 100. Highly exaggerated, but I'll give you that. Even a million faulty devices would make:
    1 000 000*100/230 000 000 = 0,4347%

    That means there would be 99,5653% without IC problems. But in court you can't assume anything. They'll only count registered cases. Which would make for 0,004347%. That's not only insignificant, but actually is a really good fault rate.
    What defect is there for Apple to acknowledge? Let alone justify an out of warranty replacement. Just be glad Apple offers a discounted replacement instead of making you pay the full price.
    Yeah, yeah, numbers... When this happens consistently, albeit in a small batch, it still could point to a structural issue. And perhaps it just takes time to develop. If that is the case we will hear much more in due time. I still think Apple should do something more than just sit on their ass and deny all responsibility. Right now they behave like someone who closes his eyes and hopes it all blows over. Well, I think it won't. 
    Roger_FingasGeorgeBMaclostkiwi
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