New 13" MacBook Pro w/o Touch Bar keeps pace with higher clocked 2015 Retina model

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited October 2016
Benchmarks of Apple's new MacBook Pro lineup are making their way online just hours after Thursday's unveiling, with initial tests putting the entry-level 13-inch model without Touch Bar at performance levels equivalent to last year's 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display.




Out of three tests submitted to the Geekbench 4 test suite database, the highest single-core score achieved by the new bottom tier MacBook Pro -- designated "macbook13,1" -- comes in at 3,589 points, while the highest multi-core score is listed as 7,229 points. On the low end, an identical configuration reached single- and multi-core scores of 2,400 points and 5,702 points, respectively.

Primate Labs founder John Poole shared the results in a tweet late Thursday.

The machine, or machines, tested were equipped with a sixth-generation 2GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor running 8GB of RAM, Apple's baseline configuration. By comparison, recent Geekbench 4 scores for early-2015 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro models equipped with fifth-generation 2.7GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 CPUs hover at around 3,500 points for single-core and about 6,800 points for multi-core.

Graphical processing benchmarks for the new 13-inch MacBook Pro were unavailable at press time.

As noted by Apple earlier today, the redesigned MacBook Pro line is powered by Intel's power efficient Skylake family of processors. The $1,499 13-inch model comes standard with a dual-core CPU clocked at 2GHz, with Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz. Customers can swap the chip out for an optional 2.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 with Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz for an extra $300.

While not a particularly fair comparison, Apple is targeting the entry-level 13-inch Pro variant at potential MacBook Air upgraders. For early-2015 13-inch MacBook Air models running standard 1.6GHz Core i5 CPUs, recent Geekbench listings reveal single- and multi-core scores of 3,200 points and 5,700 points on the high end. Apple discontinued the ultraportable 11-inch version with the introduction of today's hardware, but continues to sell the 13-inch MacBook Air for $999. B&H, an Apple authorized reseller, is discounting models further with configurations starting at $899 per our Mac Price Guide.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 43
    jason98jason98 Posts: 749member
    MacBook Pro w/o Touch Bar seems to come without Touch ID.

    mike1
  • Reply 2 of 43
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 281member
    It makes no sense that the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro released today - when upgraded to the 2.4 GHz CPU - costs the same as the Magicful 13" MacBook Pro, which comes with the 2.9 GHz CPU, Touch Bar, and Touch ID sensor. It looks as though Apple had made a mistake and priced the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro a few hundred dollars too high. 

    Because the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro comes with a much slower CPU than the Magicful 13" MacBook Pro, and the Magicless MacBook Pro lacks the Touch bar as well as the Touch ID sensor, it should have been priced at $1099 (or $1199 at the most). This could have been the machine that - when upgraded to a higher CPU speed, to 512 GB of SSD and to 16 GB of RAM - could still be had for under $1899. This would still be very expensive for a dual-core laptop but somewhat manageable. As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers. Perhaps, the Apple executives make way too much money that they have lost all remaining sense of reality at this point. 
    edited October 2016 jahaja1983irelandalphafoxperkedel
  • Reply 3 of 43
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    lolliverstevehDeelronBluntmike1
  • Reply 4 of 43
    For comparison, my mid 2012 rMBP 2.3 Ghz scores 3140 single core and 10109 multicore
  • Reply 5 of 43
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,339member
    sirozha said:
    It makes no sense that the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro released today - when upgraded to the 2.4 GHz CPU - costs the same as the Magicful 13" MacBook Pro, which comes with the 2.9 GHz CPU, Touch Bar, and Touch ID sensor. It looks as though Apple had made a mistake and priced the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro a few hundred dollars too high. 

    Because the Magicless 13" MacBook Pro comes with a much slower CPU than the Magicful 13" MacBook Pro, and the Magicless MacBook Pro lacks the Touch bar as well as the Touch ID sensor, it should have been priced at $1099 (or $1199 at the most). This could have been the machine that - when upgraded to a higher CPU speed, to 512 GB of SSD and to 16 GB of RAM - could still be had for under $1899. This would still be very expensive for a dual-core laptop but somewhat manageable. As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers. Perhaps, the Apple executives make way too much money that they have lost all remaining sense of reality at this point. 
    Pricing is never logical, always psychological. It's fairly obviously, based on pricing, what Apple wants you to buy.
    lolliverpscooter63
  • Reply 6 of 43
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,761member
    I just checked the Primate Labs website, http://browser.primatelabs.com/mac-benchmarks, and it was last updated 17 hours ago so I guess we'll need to wait until tomorrow to see what actual scores show up. Geekbench 4 does GPU benchmarks so those should show up as well. It would be nice if Apple would simply run the tests on MBPs connected to the internet so they're tracked and we can all see legitimate scores. (Are you listening Apple?????)
  • Reply 7 of 43
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 281member
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    Because I have been one for many years. I can easily afford any of the new MacBook Pro, but I'm in the upper 5% of earners in the US. Even though none of the newly released MacBook Pros would make a noticeable dent in my budget, I will not be buying any model released today if they stay at the current price points. Apple has insulted their consumer base with these prices and the asinine design decisions that prevent the newly released iPhone 7 from being able to connect to the newly released MacBook Pro without an additional dongle, which Apple was too cheap to include with the MacBook pros.

    I'm extremely upset about what Apple did today as a shareholder with a very sizeable AAPL portfolio (very sizable indeed). They will lose the notebook market share by a large percentage because of the bad decisions that they made with this MacBook Pro release. 
    edited October 2016 aylkalphafox
  • Reply 8 of 43
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,339member
    sirozha said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    Because I have been one for many years. I can easily afford any of the new MacBook Pro, but I'm in the upper 5% of earners in the US. Even though none of the newly released MacBook Pros would make a noticeable dent in my budget, I will not be buying any model released today if they stay at the current price points. Apple has insulted their consumer base with these prices and the asinine design decisions that prevent the newly released iPhone 7 from being able to connect to the newly released MacBook Pro without an additional dongle, which Apple was too cheap to include with the MacBook pros.

    I'm extremely upset about what Apple did today as a shareholder with a very sizeable AAPL portfolio (very sizable indeed). They will lose the notebook market share by a large percentage because of the bad decisions that they made with this MacBook Pro release. 
    I wouldn't get all in a frenzy just yet. Apple has, in the past, dropped prices on Mac models after being on the market for about a year. Perfect example is the MBA, & 27" Retina iMac. So let's see what happens. There's a slight chance that by this time next year, prices on these new MBP & MB machines will drop by $200.
    bb-15argonaut
  • Reply 9 of 43
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,761member
    sirozha said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    Because I have been one for many years. I can easily afford any of the new MacBook Pro, but I'm in the upper 5% of earners in the US. Even though none of the newly released MacBook Pros would make a noticeable dent in my budget, I will not be buying any model released today if they stay at the current price points. Apple has insulted their consumer base with these prices and the asinine design decisions that prevent the newly released iPhone 7 from being able to connect to the newly released MacBook Pro without an additional dongle, which Apple was too cheap to include with the MacBook pros.

    I'm extremely upset about what Apple did today as a shareholder with a very sizeable AAPL portfolio (very sizable indeed). They will lose the notebook market share by a large percentage because of the bad decisions that they made with this MacBook Pro release. 
    Apple is now selling a USB-C (Thunderbolt 3) to Lightning cable for $25. I wonder if they'll start including it with the iPhone 7 once enough new MBPs have been sold. This isn't a dongle, it's simply a cable that plugs into one of the MBP ports. As for the prices, I wish they were lower but they are affordable if people don't have to replace them as often as cheap PCs. As a sizable AAPL owner, you have to understand that Apple is being pushed to maintain its profit margin. If they don't stupid Wall Street hammers them and you lose stock value. Which pocket are you worried about? The one you pay for Macs with or the one that keeps you in the top 5%?
    jahajaBluntargonautJanNL
  • Reply 10 of 43
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 3,957member
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers...

    I'll take a moment to assume that you're simply not trying to pass off complete bullshit as fact and simply ask how you came to the conclusion that this new laptops are priced too high more the majority of Apple customers.  Did you interview customers?  Focus groups?

    Waiting....
    lolliverpscooter63stevehBluntargonautJanNLjony0
  • Reply 11 of 43
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 281member
    sirozha said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    Because I have been one for many years. I can easily afford any of the new MacBook Pro, but I'm in the upper 5% of earners in the US. Even though none of the newly released MacBook Pros would make a noticeable dent in my budget, I will not be buying any model released today if they stay at the current price points. Apple has insulted their consumer base with these prices and the asinine design decisions that prevent the newly released iPhone 7 from being able to connect to the newly released MacBook Pro without an additional dongle, which Apple was too cheap to include with the MacBook pros.

    I'm extremely upset about what Apple did today as a shareholder with a very sizeable AAPL portfolio (very sizable indeed). They will lose the notebook market share by a large percentage because of the bad decisions that they made with this MacBook Pro release. 
    I wouldn't get all in a frenzy just yet. Apple has, in the past, dropped prices on Mac models after being on the market for about a year. Perfect example is the MBA, & 27" Retina iMac. So let's see what happens. There's a slight chance that by this time next year, prices on these new MBP & MB machines will drop by $200.

    if they do this in a year, it will be too late. And the prices should drop by $400 - at least - to be reasonable. Apple was trying to preserve high profit margins, but they are going to lose both revenue and profits by chasing high profit margins in these Late 2016 MacaBook Pros. 

    Im not even going to bring up the asinine concept of having to carry multiple dongles to connect devices to the new MacBook Pros. Why didn't Apple put a Lightning port in the MacBook Pros so the iPhone  7 headphones could be used with these new MacBook Pros? Why didn't Apple include a USB-A-to-USB-C adapter with the MacBook Pros so that folks could connect their iPhones to these MacBook Pros? All of these really strange design decisions aside, the pricing of the Late 2016 MacBook Pros is preposterous.  

  • Reply 12 of 43
    ...hmmm what I had hoped for today did not transpire either...

    - a 17" mbp as a portable desktop (aka alienware 5k display) to work in pro mac apps
    - an 11" air with ram/graphic updates as an ultraportable to run pro mac apps if needed

    Running 4@4k as offered is no mean feat, but to me 15.4" is too small for solo work on the road,
    nor small (2lb) enough to without concern shut & go for basics or 'just in case', with an external option...

    I guess we'll see soon enough if the MBP refinements bridge the 11" air...?

  • Reply 13 of 43
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 281member
    sflocal said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers...

    I'll take a moment to assume that you're simply not trying to pass off complete bullshit as fact and simply ask how you came to the conclusion that this new laptops are priced too high more the majority of Apple customers.  Did you interview customers?  Focus groups?

    Waiting....
    That was my opinion. I also saw the reaction on many forums (respectable ones) by folks who have been Apple customers for decades. I don't need to do a poll to have an opinion, but if you want to see a poll, go to 9to5mac and see for yourself. You can even cast your own vote there. 

    Money is no object for me personally. I think these prices are insulting - the same way that a $600 link bracelet for Apple Watch is insulting. When Apple prices some of their products like that while still having reasonably priced choices, I shake my head and chalk it up to a small number of crazy people who are willing to pay this sort of prices. In this case, however, there are no reasonably priced options. Apple probably doesn't really care about maintaining the Mac market share. All they care about now is maintaining or increasing the profit margins. For the first time in over a decade, I have no desire to watch the event. I think this was a really bad decision - from both the design and the pricing perspective. I'm not speaking as a consumer here as much as I'm speaking as a shareholder. 
    edited October 2016 mainyehcalphafox
  • Reply 14 of 43
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,339member
    sirozha said:
    sirozha said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers.
    How do you know that?
    Because I have been one for many years. I can easily afford any of the new MacBook Pro, but I'm in the upper 5% of earners in the US. Even though none of the newly released MacBook Pros would make a noticeable dent in my budget, I will not be buying any model released today if they stay at the current price points. Apple has insulted their consumer base with these prices and the asinine design decisions that prevent the newly released iPhone 7 from being able to connect to the newly released MacBook Pro without an additional dongle, which Apple was too cheap to include with the MacBook pros.

    I'm extremely upset about what Apple did today as a shareholder with a very sizeable AAPL portfolio (very sizable indeed). They will lose the notebook market share by a large percentage because of the bad decisions that they made with this MacBook Pro release. 
    I wouldn't get all in a frenzy just yet. Apple has, in the past, dropped prices on Mac models after being on the market for about a year. Perfect example is the MBA, & 27" Retina iMac. So let's see what happens. There's a slight chance that by this time next year, prices on these new MBP & MB machines will drop by $200.

    if they do this in a year, it will be too late. And the prices should drop by $400 - at least - to be reasonable. Apple was trying to preserve high profit margins, but they are going to lose both revenue and profits by chasing high profit margins in these Late 2016 MacaBook Pros. 

    Im not even going to bring up the asinine concept of having to carry multiple dongles to connect devices to the new MacBook Pros. Why didn't Apple put a Lightning port in the MacBook Pros so the iPhone  7 headphones could be used with these new MacBook Pros? Why didn't Apple include a USB-A-to-USB-C adapter with the MacBook Pros so that folks could connect their iPhones to these MacBook Pros? All of these really strange design decisions aside, the pricing of the Late 2016 MacBook Pros is preposterous.  

    Not all Mac users are iPhone user and vice versa. Market share is not the domain or purpose of the Mac. That's what iPhones / iPads are for
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 15 of 43
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,339member
    sirozha said:
    sflocal said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers...

    I'll take a moment to assume that you're simply not trying to pass off complete bullshit as fact and simply ask how you came to the conclusion that this new laptops are priced too high more the majority of Apple customers.  Did you interview customers?  Focus groups?

    Waiting....
    That was my opinion. I also saw the reaction on many forums (respectable ones) by folks who have been Apple customers for decades. I don't need to do a poll to have an opinion. 

    Money is no object for me personally. I think these prices are insulting - the same way that a $600 link bracelet for Apple Watch is insulting. When Apple prices some of their products like that while still having reasonably priced choices, I shake my head and chalk it up to a small number of crazy people who are willing to pay this sort of prices. In this case, however, there are no reasonably priced options. Apple probably doesn't really care about maintaining the Mac market share. All they care about now is maintaining or increasing the profit margins. For the first time in over a decade, I have no desire to watch the event. I think this was a really bad decision - from both the design and the pricing perspective. I'm not speaking as a consumer here as much as I'm speaking as a shareholder. 
    "All they care about now is maintaining or increasing the profit margins."

    In light of what is going in the PC / Mac industry, you're probably right


  • Reply 16 of 43
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 281member
    sirozha said:
    sflocal said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers...

    I'll take a moment to assume that you're simply not trying to pass off complete bullshit as fact and simply ask how you came to the conclusion that this new laptops are priced too high more the majority of Apple customers.  Did you interview customers?  Focus groups?

    Waiting....
    That was my opinion. I also saw the reaction on many forums (respectable ones) by folks who have been Apple customers for decades. I don't need to do a poll to have an opinion. 

    Money is no object for me personally. I think these prices are insulting - the same way that a $600 link bracelet for Apple Watch is insulting. When Apple prices some of their products like that while still having reasonably priced choices, I shake my head and chalk it up to a small number of crazy people who are willing to pay this sort of prices. In this case, however, there are no reasonably priced options. Apple probably doesn't really care about maintaining the Mac market share. All they care about now is maintaining or increasing the profit margins. For the first time in over a decade, I have no desire to watch the event. I think this was a really bad decision - from both the design and the pricing perspective. I'm not speaking as a consumer here as much as I'm speaking as a shareholder. 
    "All they care about now is maintaining or increasing the profit margins."

    In light of what is going in the PC / Mac industry, you're probably right


    And by the way, profit margins do not directly translate to profit. Apple may lose a significant chunk in profits by shrinking the Mac market share due to these ridiculous prices, but they may boost their profit margins, and Wall Street may reward them for it. Profit margins seem to be more important to Wall Street than profits. 
    edited October 2016 mainyehc
  • Reply 17 of 43
    sflocal said:
    sirozha said:
    As it stands now, not a single MacBook Pro released today is priced within reason for the majority of Apple customers...

    I'll take a moment to assume that you're simply not trying to pass off complete bullshit as fact and simply ask how you came to the conclusion that this new laptops are priced too high more the majority of Apple customers.  Did you interview customers?  Focus groups?

    Waiting....

    Dude knows what he's talking about. He's in the upper 5% of earners in the US with a substantial portfolio of AAPL i
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 18 of 43
    francophile99francophile99 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    To address the "ridiculous price" claim that some are making, I think it may be wise to also consider what is the "value added" to a device like this when Apple introduces an entirely new input technology - the Touch Bar.  The jury is out on this because we won't really know until more and more people start using this as a 3rd method of input  alongside the best-in-class, multi-touch trackpad and the classic keyboard. If, however, use of this new input method enhances productivity by better enabling human-machine interaction in an ergonomic manner, then the extra several hundreds will be money well-spent when you consider the multi-year lifetime of a solidly designed product like this. Do not underestimate the engineers at Apple and the care and thought that has likely gone on for several years in order to bring a possible game-changer technology to market. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 43
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,339member
    To address the "ridiculous price" claim that some are making, I think it may be wise to also consider what is the "value added" to a device like this when Apple introduces an entirely new input technology - the Touch Bar.  The jury is out on this because we won't really know until more and more people start using this as a 3rd method of input  alongside the best-in-class, multi-touch trackpad and the classic keyboard. If, however, use of this new input method enhances productivity by better enabling human-machine interaction in an ergonomic manner, then the extra several hundreds will be money well-spent when you consider the multi-year lifetime of a solidly designed product like this. Do not underestimate the engineers at Apple and the care and thought that has likely gone on for several years in order to bring a possible game-changer technology to market. 
    Not that you're wrong, but people are still mesmerized by the MS Surface Studio
    1983
  • Reply 20 of 43
    19831983 Posts: 972member
    The new 13" rMBP still sticking to dual-core CPUs and integrated graphics is disappointing...that is not a 'pro' specification. And while the touch bar is a nice useful upgrade, it just makes me think why didn't they just replace the entire keyboard with a haptic feedback touchscreen instead...price & tech limitations I suppose, but still the touch bar seems to be a halfway house solution. The competition will probably be first with a full dual screen laptop now. Maybe MS?
    edited October 2016
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