Developer brings classic FPS Doom to Touch Bar on Apple's MacBook Pro

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
In an unusual proof of its versatility, one developer has managed to get id Software's original Doom running on the new MacBook Pro's Touch Bar.




The port -- by Adam Bell -- isn't available publicly, presumably in part because it's impractical to play. The Touch Bar uses a 2170-by-60 display, which squashes the game's vertical resolution so much that levels and enemies become indistinguishable.

It is technically playable however, complete with music and sound effects pumped through the Pro's speakers.



The Touch Bar is meant to be a function key replacement, displaying context-sensitive controls that go beyond regular buttons, thanks to a multitouch display. Because it has its own dedicated processor -- the Apple T1 -- it appears to be capable of running self-contained apps, though this falls outside of official guidelines.

Running id games like Doom, Quake, and Wolfenstein 3D is often one way developers will test the capabilities of new hardware, despite some of the titles being decades old. The first Doom dates back to 1993, and even Quake was released in 1996. The 2016 Doom reboot is sometimes considered a good way of testing high-end gaming PCs.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    Interesting.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 19
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,786member
    Chainsaw FTW.
    watto_cobralolliverargonaut
  • Reply 3 of 19
    Yeah, but can it run Crysis?
    singularitycalirattlhedgtr
  • Reply 4 of 19
    Proof the 2016 MacBook Pro is DOOMed.
    king editor the gratechiacalimagman1979slprescottgtrKenster999lamboaudi4lolliverargonaut
  • Reply 5 of 19
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,276member
    While playing full doom is a dumb idea on the touchbar, it does show what's possible.  It also would be a neat way to provide gaming "heads-up display" like that at the bottom of doom and a way to quickly switch weapons, etc.
    chiacalimagman1979lolliverargonaut
  • Reply 6 of 19
    irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,545member
    Ok that is just cool AF. Impractical but cool. 

    Also, screw the official guidelines, this isn't iOS you can install apps from anywhere. 

    Hopefully this will inspire other inventive uses of the touchbar. 
    edited November 2016 watto_cobralolliverargonaut
  • Reply 7 of 19
    irnchriz said:
    Ok that is just cool AF. Impractical but cool. 

    Also, screw the official guidelines, this isn't iOS you can install apps from anywhere. 

    Hopefully this will inspire other inventive uses of the touchbar. 
    I hope that developers will pay close attention to the guidelines and work within them for the most part. One of the reasons the original Mac was successful was because every application did certain things the same way (based on the original human interface guidelines). If the typical app does random nonsense with the touch bar it will become an unreliable gimmick.
    dysamorialolliver
  • Reply 8 of 19
    thavith_6502thavith_6502 Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    Next time someone films the touch bar, could they hold the camera directly over it, not at a slant like this one...  Thanks...
    retrogustoslprescottlolliverargonaut
  • Reply 9 of 19
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
     Nice. This shows the capabilities and I hope developers take advantage of this soon. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 19
    Developer needs to get a freaking tripod so we can see it working properly not that horrid video.
  • Reply 11 of 19
    Next time someone films the touch bar, could they hold the camera directly over it, not at a slant like this one...  Thanks...
    The Touch Bar is designed to be viewed from an angle. The coating and pixel placement is such that it's the most optimal viewing (and no doubt filming) angle. 
    Rayz2016lolliverargonaut
  • Reply 12 of 19
    Again: why is the touch bar so overdeveloped?
  • Reply 13 of 19
    dysamoria said:
    Again: why is the touch bar so overdeveloped?

    What do you mean by "over"-developed? 
    lolliverargonaut
  • Reply 14 of 19
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,660member
    dysamoria said:
    Again: why is the touch bar so overdeveloped?

    What do you mean by "over"-developed? 
    Why is it a computer within a computer? Seems to be way more complexity than a control panel should have. I mean, what happens when that little iOS crashes and you can't operate the controls that are supposed to be presented there?
  • Reply 15 of 19
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,509member
    dysamoria said:
    dysamoria said:
    Again: why is the touch bar so overdeveloped?

    What do you mean by "over"-developed? 
    Why is it a computer within a computer? Seems to be way more complexity than a control panel should have. I mean, what happens when that little iOS crashes and you can't operate the controls that are supposed to be presented there?
    I imagine the main OS restarts it. It probably restarts every time you switch to a differerent app. 

    It needs to be programmable, using an API that is easy to use and that developers are familiar with. It needs to have a very high resolution screen so that people think they are looking at buttons, and not a screen showing buttons. It needs to support animation without stuttering and flickering. So yes, it does need to be a computer. 
    watto_cobralolliverargonaut
  • Reply 16 of 19
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,660member
    Rayz2016 said:
    dysamoria said:
    dysamoria said:
    Again: why is the touch bar so overdeveloped?

    What do you mean by "over"-developed? 
    Why is it a computer within a computer? Seems to be way more complexity than a control panel should have. I mean, what happens when that little iOS crashes and you can't operate the controls that are supposed to be presented there?
    I imagine the main OS restarts it. It probably restarts every time you switch to a differerent app. 

    It needs to be programmable, using an API that is easy to use and that developers are familiar with. It needs to have a very high resolution screen so that people think they are looking at buttons, and not a screen showing buttons. It needs to support animation without stuttering and flickering. So yes, it does need to be a computer. 
    That doesn't explain why it's not part of the main computer CPU and operating system. I can see the graphics controller needing to be independent, but not the rest.
  • Reply 17 of 19

    Developer brings classic…Doom to Touch Bar on Apple's MacBook Pro


    I don't get it, I thought the touch bar was a great idea, why anyone would bring or spell doom for such technological innovation is just crazy. 

    Go Phil, Go Phil—don't let developers doom the Touch Bar!!!!

    FPS? First person shooter, christ, you kidding, let's not shoot anything down until we give it a chance.




  • Reply 18 of 19
    OMFG I want that! I love TouchBar!
    argonaut
  • Reply 19 of 19
    2170 60 = 130,200, 42% of VGA. Split-four screen and half field one could play most classic games comfortably.
Sign In or Register to comment.