LaCie teams with Seagate for new MacBook Pro compatible Thunderbolt 3 external drives

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in Current Mac Hardware
LaCie has teamed up with Seagate Technology to produce a new LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt USB-C drive and d2 storage solution, compatible with Apple's latest generation of Thunderbolt 3 MacBook Pros.

LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt USB-C
LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt USB-C


The drives, which are popular among photographers and videographers, aim to help create more efficient ways to manage large data quantities with "more speed, higher capacity and better compatibility."

The Rugged Thunderbolt drive combines an established design with USB-C connectivity and Seagate BarraCuda hard drives. It has mobile HDD capacity of up to 5 terabytes and will also be available in a 1-terabyte solid-state model that LaCie is touting as 30 percent faster than the previous generation at speeds of up to 510 megabytes per second. The company claims that users can transfer 100GB of content in roughly 3 minutes.

The units have a rugged build -- shock, dust and water resistant -- and will be available by the end of March in 2TB, 4TB and 5TB HDD and 500 GB and 1 TB SSD starting at $249.99.

LaCie d2
LaCie d2


LaCie is also releasing the d2 Thunderbolt 3, a desktop drive that is designed to add up to 10 terabytes of additional storage to SDD limited laptops and all-in-one computers. Other specs include a Seagate 7200 RPM hard disk drive with speeds of up to 240MB/s. LaCie says thats a 10 percent improvement over the previous generation.

Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports allow users to daisy chain dual 4K displays, a single 5K display or up to six LaCie d2 drives. It's also possible to power the latest MacBOok Pro through its USB-C port.

The drive is coming in 6TN, 8TB and 10TB and start at $429.99. They're expected to ship this quarter.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    I love the Lacie Rugged series but don't have first hand experience with the d2 series. Is the d2 reliable?
  • Reply 2 of 16
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,791member
    "Teams up with"?

    i thought they OWNED Seagate (or vice versa).
    pulseimagesmknelsonSpamSandwichJinTech
  • Reply 3 of 16
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,613member
    I will only use SSD's, even in external back-up drives. I recently duplicated my work mac onto a small portable 1tb SSD (USB3), and with that little thing in my pocket any relatively recent Mac becomes mine with a quick re-start. I love the speed of this unit and within a short space of time decided that I'm going all SSD. 
    pulseimagesSpamSandwich
  • Reply 4 of 16
    correct Seagate bought LaCie to match the Hitachi/G-Drive thing. If anyone knows if Segate/Buffalo are the the same chime in.


  • Reply 5 of 16
    stimpy said:
    correct Seagate bought LaCie to match the Hitachi/G-Drive thing. If anyone knows if Segate/Buffalo are the the same chime in.


    Which is better quality/dependability wise, Seagate/Lacie or Hitachi/G-Drive?

    I've only used Lacie when they were a standalone company.

  • Reply 6 of 16
    stimpy said:
    correct Seagate bought LaCie to match the Hitachi/G-Drive thing. If anyone knows if Segate/Buffalo are the the same chime in.


    Which is better quality/dependability wise, Seagate/Lacie or Hitachi/G-Drive?

    I've only used Lacie when they were a standalone company.

    Tricky question.

    In general I would say HGST/G-Drive. Have a look at Backblaze's reliability stats. Admittedly those guys abuse drives sometimes - non NAS drives in custom NAS enclosures: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-stats-q1-2016/

    The trick is HGST is now owned by Western Digital and some larger capacity (2.5" 5400 rpm mechanisms only iirc) use WD drives instead of HGST.

    The main long-term weakness I have seen for LaCie has been the AC adapters for their RAIDs rather than the drives themselves.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 7 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,701member
    What's the wait with portable TB3-SSD drives using the full bandwidth of SSD?  Using TB3 with a  mechanical hard drive is a slight improvement, but a modern PCI-e based SSD drive is at least 3 times faster than the fasted mechanical hard drive.  
    pulseimages
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Why on earth would someone want a usb-c connected single spinning slow harddisk? Isn't the whole point of usb-c that it is fast?!
    pulseimages
  • Reply 9 of 16
    I don't like the phrase "Mac compatible" in this context. If it's a Thunderbolt 3 drive, it's Mac compatible; to suggest any one might not be will confuse users.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 10 of 16
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,791member
    Why on earth would someone want a usb-c connected single spinning slow harddisk? Isn't the whole point of usb-c that it is fast?!
    The point of USB-C is that it's the standard. 

    Why would anybody want a peripheral that ISN'T USB-C*?


    *) Thunderbolt excepted, obviously — but even that's the same connector.
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 11 of 16
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,086member
    Why on earth would someone want a usb-c connected single spinning slow harddisk? Isn't the whole point of usb-c that it is fast?!
    Totally agree. TB3 is sitting idle for most of the time with a single hard drive. If you're going to spend extra for TB3 circuitry then you have to start with at least a dual hard drive RAID or the fastest SSD. like in the latest MBPs. Anything else you might as use a less expensive USB-3 drive unit.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 12 of 16
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,850member
    The annoying things is it is very hard to find an external thunderbolt drive case only to put your own drive in there. This is a licensing requirement imposed by Intel I believe. An enclosure must be sold with a drive installed.
    Hence they all tend to come with slow HDD and a SATA connection mostly negating the benefit of thunderbolt over USB3.

    I have only ever seen a driveless thunderbolt enclosure sold by de-lock. Don't bother, it's poorly built rubbish.
    Better to get one of these laCies with the smallest HDD possible (for price reasons) and replace it with the SSD of your choice.
    That is what I have done with my 2011 iMac, and now use the LaCie with a Samsung 850 SSD as my startup drive (2011 iMac does not have USB3, so worth the additional cost for a thunderbolt single drive).
    edited January 2017 pulseimagesstevenoz
  • Reply 13 of 16
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,850member
    rob53 said:
    Why on earth would someone want a usb-c connected single spinning slow harddisk? Isn't the whole point of usb-c that it is fast?!
    Totally agree. TB3 is sitting idle for most of the time with a single hard drive. If you're going to spend extra for TB3 circuitry then you have to start with at least a dual hard drive RAID or the fastest SSD. like in the latest MBPs. Anything else you might as use a less expensive USB-3 drive unit.
     Yes, if you have USB3 you could buy a much cheaper USB3 enclosure as the speed limitation in these drives is its SATA connection to the drive, limiting performance to max around 500-600 MB/s. You would get close enough to that with USB3 anyway to not pay the extra for thunderbolt. To get the benefit of thunderbolt over USB3 with the drives connected via SATA you would need a multi drive raid configuration.

    if you have an older iMac on the other hand with only usb2 it is worth getting a thunderbolt single drive because it is much faster.  Not these ones though as I think the connector isn't compatible with the imac's thunderbolt port.
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 14 of 16
    ....
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 15 of 16
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 393member
    spheric said:
    "Teams up with"?

    i thought they OWNED Seagate (or vice versa).
    ha! My thoughts exactly lol 
  • Reply 16 of 16
    Apple teams with Beats to release Powerbeats Wireless.
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