Alpine announces iLX-107 in-dash receiver with wireless Apple CarPlay

Posted:
in iPhone
Drivers will be able to ditch their Lightning cable and still use Apple's CarPlay with the new Alpine iLX-107 in-car infotainment system, featuring a 7-inch touchscreen and built-in AM/FM receiver.




The iLX-107 will launch this February for $900, and provides wireless connectivity to an iPhone over 5GHz Wi-Fi. After setting up the system, it will automatically search for and connect the most frequently paired iPhone for all subsequent uses.

Unlike with most other CarPlay installations, there is no need to connect a Lightning cable to an iPhone to use the features of the infotainment system. Capabilities include receiving calls, accessing text messages, playing music, and getting directions optimized for traffic conditions.

All of the functions of CarPlay are optimized for use while driving, intending to allow drivers to keep their eyes on the road.

The iLX-107 is also compatible with Alpine's TuneIt app, which provides custom sound tuning. The head unit also includes three 2-volt preouts, one auxiliary input, Alpine's MediaXpander technology for improved playback of compressed media, and an input for a sold-separately rear view camera system.

The device can also retain select factory vehicle features with an optional iDatalink Maestro module specific to the user's vehicle. Customized vehicle information, including a gauge screen and parking assist, can also be seen on the 7-inch display, with features varying by car model.

Wireless CarPlay support debuted in a beta version of iOS 8 back in 2015, but car makers and aftermarket installs have been slow to adopt the technology. The 2017 BMW 5 Series Sedan was the first car to support CarPlay without a Lightning cable.

Apple CarPlay is compatible with iPhone 5 and later.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,991member
    Alpine, can you please show Toyota how to put in-dash console with Apple wireless Car-play ? Toyota is like old IBM, get screwed but won't adopt new tech trend until see total annihilation is closer. I like Toyota cars but won't buy their new vehicle until they implement Carplay/Androidauto.
    edited January 2017 watto_cobraschlack
  • Reply 2 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,310member
    Sweet! Finally. However...Alpine's previous head-unit, iLX-007 didn't support plain old BT, which was kinda weak.
    edited January 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 13
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,413member
    WTH Alpine, what is it with only supporting 2-volt pre-outs in your CarPlay head units!? This is 2017, and a high end head unit. Zero excuses for 2-volt pre-outs in this day in age in a $900 head unit. I was waiting for this the last two years and will pass it without blinking because of this.
    potatoleeksoup
  • Reply 4 of 13
    Sweet! Finally. However...Alpine's previous head-unit, iLX-007 didn't support plain old BT, which was kinda weak.
    Agreed. Plain old Bluetooth is pretty weak. 
  • Reply 5 of 13
    emig647 said:
    WTH Alpine, what is it with only supporting 2-volt pre-outs in your CarPlay head units!? This is 2017, and a high end head unit. Zero excuses for 2-volt pre-outs in this day in age in a $900 head unit. I was waiting for this the last two years and will pass it without blinking because of this.
    Not a car audio nerd. What is it about 2 volt outputs that is bad? Not even sure what use a pre-out is except for maybe a subwoofer?
  • Reply 6 of 13
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,413member
    @polymnia ;
    Yep, used for subwoofer, rear and front channels. The problem with 2-volt vs 4-volt or 5-volt is that you need to turn the gain up higher to match the incoming signals. 2-volt doesn't carry a strong signal from the head unit to the amplifier which makes it prone to interference. It also requires turning gain up higher to match it, which could cause distortion to speakers if not set properly. Almost all cheap head units have 2-volt. 4 & 5 volt pre-outs are all standard on $175 head units and up on average. This is the only CarPlay head unit out there that has 2-volt. I guess they think we don't care about audio quality. 

    I'm a HUGE Alpine fan, I swear by their amps and Type-R speakers. But their head units have just plummeted over the last few years. 
    polymnia
  • Reply 7 of 13
    No word on battery life = Not even worth a look.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,310member
    polymnia said:
    Sweet! Finally. However...Alpine's previous head-unit, iLX-007 didn't support plain old BT, which was kinda weak.
    Agreed. Plain old Bluetooth is pretty weak. 
    With the -007 you had to physically plug in the iphone in order to use phone features -- could not just leave it in your pocket to accept a call or play music. Definitely was a lame aspect of the product. Granted this has the wireless carplay, but BT is still a major wireless protocol and I'd want it for other device support. 
  • Reply 9 of 13
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 933member
    emig647 said:
    @polymnia ;
    Yep, used for subwoofer, rear and front channels. The problem with 2-volt vs 4-volt or 5-volt is that you need to turn the gain up higher to match the incoming signals. 2-volt doesn't carry a strong signal from the head unit to the amplifier which makes it prone to interference. It also requires turning gain up higher to match it, which could cause distortion to speakers if not set properly. Almost all cheap head units have 2-volt. 4 & 5 volt pre-outs are all standard on $175 head units and up on average. This is the only CarPlay head unit out there that has 2-volt. I guess they think we don't care about audio quality. 

    I'm a HUGE Alpine fan, I swear by their amps and Type-R speakers. But their head units have just plummeted over the last few years. 
    Follow up question: you say the pre-out is also used for rear and front channels. Does that mean cars have amplifiers squirreled away in other locations than the dash unit? Like the back seat? In the doors? Is this typical in OEM situations or is this more in aftermarket modification?
  • Reply 10 of 13
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 933member

    polymnia said:
    Sweet! Finally. However...Alpine's previous head-unit, iLX-007 didn't support plain old BT, which was kinda weak.
    Agreed. Plain old Bluetooth is pretty weak. 
    With the -007 you had to physically plug in the iphone in order to use phone features -- could not just leave it in your pocket to accept a call or play music. Definitely was a lame aspect of the product. Granted this has the wireless carplay, but BT is still a major wireless protocol and I'd want it for other device support. 
    I guess BT can't hurt. I'm just supremely underwhelmed by the whole BT thing. If they can do CarPlay with wifi, and leave out BT, I'm all for that.
  • Reply 11 of 13
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,579member
    Never knew you could do car play with wifi - wish more companies would use it. Having to plug the phone in is the one drawback compared to BT. 

    I'm pretty underwhelmed with BT too. Managing multiple devices, connecting and disconnecting is a pain, inconsistent connectivity, audio lag...

    does the BT spec even have the capability for something like car play?
  • Reply 12 of 13
    So if it links up via Wifi, how will my phone know to switch to the deck's SSID if my house's SSID is still within range? Like if I'm parked in the driveway?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 13
    emig647 said:
    @polymnia ;
    Yep, used for subwoofer, rear and front channels. The problem with 2-volt vs 4-volt or 5-volt is that you need to turn the gain up higher to match the incoming signals. 2-volt doesn't carry a strong signal from the head unit to the amplifier which makes it prone to interference. It also requires turning gain up higher to match it, which could cause distortion to speakers if not set properly. Almost all cheap head units have 2-volt. 4 & 5 volt pre-outs are all standard on $175 head units and up on average. This is the only CarPlay head unit out there that has 2-volt. I guess they think we don't care about audio quality. 

    I'm a HUGE Alpine fan, I swear by their amps and Type-R speakers. But their head units have just plummeted over the last few years. 
    I used to be really serious about car audio, but that was 30+ years ago and I haven't followed developments since then at all.

    Back then, alternator noise caused by ground loops between components was a serious problem. Is that still the case? If so, why do manufacturers continue to analog audio between the head unit and downstream components at all? Why not go digital over optical? That would completely isolate the audio path from the vehicle power. They wouldn't even have to develop a standard -- TOSLink already exists as a low-cost, easy-to-build-in system.

    I see AI has an article about a Clarion unit that apparently uses optical between the head and the amp, but I haven't read up on it. Is it TOSLink or some proprietary format? Is it interconnectable with components from other manufacturers? Are components with digital interconnects instead of analog common or is this Clarion system unique?

    I'm interested again because the Boston Acoustics OEM amp in our Jeep Commander has failed for the THIRD time and I'm finally inclined to replace it with something else. I still don't know whether I'll be able to keep the surprisingly good speakers that still work fine or if either some custom EQ in the active electronics or weird impedance will make it necessary to replace those too. I'm past the stage where building the system is part of the fun. I just want it to work with as little intervention from me as possible!
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