Energous, Dialog Semiconductor launch small RF charging circuit, possibly destined for 'iP...

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Dialog Semiconductor and Energous have launched a new wireless charging component that is cheaper and takes up less space than previous iterations, a part that could help Apple incorporate over-the-air power in a future iPhone or iPad.




The DA4100 RF-Transmit integrated circuit (IC) is a simplified implementation of Energous' WattUp wireless power transmission system, according to Energous and Dialog Semiconductor. The 7mm by 7mm IC combines the ARM Cortex-M0+, an RF transmitter, and power management functions, with the small size potentially making it attractive to device producers due to taking up minimal space on a circuit board.

The WattUp platform uses small antennas to transfer power, instead of relying on a system of inductive charging coils. This change in transmission technology greatly increases the distance devices can be from the power transmitter, allowing users to place the charging smartphones and tablets a few feet away, rather than placing them on a special mat or using a specific magnetic connector, as used by existing systems.

The chipset is now sampling to customers. It is not known when large-scale production of the circuitry will begin.

During the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show, Energous claimed it would demonstrate a new version of its over-the-air wireless charging technology, offering a range of up to 18 feet, potentially allowing for devices to be charged from across the room, possibly while they are being used.

The new component is the first in a partnership between the two manufacturers inked in November, where all of Energous' technology will be sold under the Dialog brand, with sales also going through Dialog. In return Dialog provided Energous with $10 million in investment, as well as providing access to Dialog's sales and distribution channels.

"We partnered with Energous because we see the potential of their technology to revolutionize the wireless charging landscape, and we believe this new IC will demonstrate how our partnership can transform device charging," said Dialog senior vice president of corporate development and strategy Mark Tyndall.

Apple is considered to be the largest customer of Dialog, believed to account for more than 70 percent of orders from the company. This sizable Apple-derived revenue strongly suggests that Apple may have an interest in acquiring the components for future devices, which has previously fueled rumors of wireless charging being introduced an upcoming iPhone refresh.

In a recent quarterly conference call, Energous revealed "most, if not all, of Energous' early adopters are existing Dialog customers." Energous has also name-checked Apple in a regulatory filing, and noted in March 2015 that it had a development and licensing agreement with a "tier one" consumer electronics company.

Energous is not the only company potentially supplying wireless charging components for the "iPhone 8." Earlier this month, a supply chain report from China claimed Lite-On Semiconductor had acquired "half of the orders for GPP bridge rectifiers that will be used in the wireless charger for the upcoming iPhones."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    This is definitely good news, wireless charging of this sort appeals to every customer and therefore every electronic device manufacturer.
    netmagewatto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 2 of 8
    tshapitshapi Posts: 292member
    Yes, it has to approached and implemented in the correct manner for it to take off. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 8
    If a transmitter is emitting energy in all directions, but the receiving antenna is only in one location, what percent of the radiated energy actually makes it to the receiver? How does its energy consumption compare to conventional plug in chargers?
    am8449badmonk
  • Reply 4 of 8
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Would you guys say this is the first "wireless charging" tech?

    The android morons are saying "Samsung already has wireless charging!!!!" But isn't that inductive charging and not "wireless"?
    Dreid1watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 8
    cali said:
    Would you guys say this is the first "wireless charging" tech?

    The android morons are saying "Samsung already has wireless charging!!!!" But isn't that inductive charging and not "wireless"?
    Of course they say that.  It isn't wireless if you have to plug the mat into the wall, and place the phone on it.  If you can't move around the room, and use the phone WHILE it's charging, it ain't wireless charging.
    Dreid1watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 6 of 8
    DonaldRW said:
    If a transmitter is emitting energy in all directions, but the receiving antenna is only in one location, what percent of the radiated energy actually makes it to the receiver? How does its energy consumption compare to conventional plug in chargers?
    The transmitter does not send out power in all directions. Basically, the xmitter is software controlled and finds the device to be charged using blue tooth and then directs a pocket of energy to the device.
    watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 7 of 8
    Would Apple implement WattUp proprietary tech if Android vaporware makers also include the same exact tech? I thought Apple's MO is to keep the tech all to themselves. 
  • Reply 8 of 8
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,585member
    Would Apple implement WattUp proprietary tech if Android vaporware makers also include the same exact tech? I thought Apple's MO is to keep the tech all to themselves. 
    "In a phone call ahead of CES (2017), Energous CEO Steve Rizzone said that wireless charging transmitters, which can charge devices wirelessly from several feet away, are now supposed to begin shipping by the end of 2017...

    While Energous' most exciting tech isn't ready yet, the company is ready to start shipping something — unfortunately, it's a much less compelling start. Rather than truly wireless transmitters, Energous is going to start with traditional "wireless" charging pads, which require devices to be placed on top of them. There's nothing particularly special about the charging pads, however devices that support them now will also be able to charge over the actual wireless transmitters that are supposed to ship later this year."

    And yeah Apple could easily keep this "all to themselves" by snatching up Energous. 
    repressthis
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