Keynote, Numbers, Pages iWork apps updated for both macOS and iOS

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in Mac Software
On Tuesday, Apple updated its Pages, Numbers, and Keynote applications for iOS and macOS, with the biggest addition being a numeric keypad for Numbers users on the iPad.




In the first software update after Apple made the suite free to all, improvements appear limited mostly to stability and performance improvements, according to Apple.

The major addition to the suite is a numeric keypad feature added to the in-app keyboard for the iPad in Numbers, which should reduce the need to switch keyboards while entering data in a spreadsheet.

While the three productivity apps were released at the same time as iOS 10.3, none of them require it. For iOS, all three apps still require iOS 10.0 or later.

Keynote occupies 695MB of device storage space, with Pages, and Numbers taking 482MB and 361MB respectively.

The macOS versions of the iWork apps all require macOS 10.12 or greater. Numbers occupies 173MB, with Pages demanding 230MB, and Keynote taking 471MB.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    adybadyb Posts: 184member
    Hooray - the loss of the numeric keyboard following the previous update was really annoying me!
    SpamSandwichwatto_cobraAirunJaeGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 19
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,086member
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
  • Reply 3 of 19
    I'm presently using Pages on my iPad Mini 2 as my main 'computer.' I'm really liking it. So much so, I'm considering getting the new iPad.

    It'd be a no brainer if it was offered in Rose gold.

    The new iPad does not work with Apple's Keyboard. Sad!
    edited April 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 19
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,171member
    rob53 said:
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
    First time this has happened to you? You'd have to have an ~8yo machine to not be able to updating to Sierra, were you not already considering upgrading your hardware?
    edited April 2017 mike1raoulduke42B3BADASSwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 19
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,412member
    rob53 said:
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
    Nope. They are also updating the iOS versions. Updating them as I write this.
    edited April 2017 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 19
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,883administrator
    I'm presently using Pages on my iPad Mini 2 as my main 'computer.' I'm really liking it. So much so, I'm considering getting the new iPad.

    It'd be a no brainer if it was offered in Rose gold.

    The new iPad does not work with Apple's Keyboard. Sad!
    Which one? The 2007, and 2009 ones work fine with mine. The original Apple Wireless Keyboard from 2003 does not, though.

    StrangeDayswatto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 7 of 19
    Bernie de KokBernie de Kok Posts: 3unconfirmed, member
    I'm presently using Pages on my iPad Mini 2 as my main 'computer.' I'm really liking it. So much so, I'm considering getting the new iPad.

    It'd be a no brainer if it was offered in Rose gold.

    The new iPad does not work with Apple's Keyboard. Sad!
    Which one? The 2007, and 2009 ones work fine with mine. The original Apple Wireless Keyboard from 2003 does not, though.

    Me thinks he is talking about the Pro with side contacts. Naturally, the new (basic) iPad doesn't support those type of keyboards ... not that they were that great anyway.  I prefer the wireless Bluetooth keyboard.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 19
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,285member
    rob53 said:
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
    First time this has happened to you? You'd have to have an ~8yo machine to not be able to updating to Sierra, were you not already considering upgrading your hardware?
    This is actually quite common. I have a mid-2009 MacBook Pro 5,5 that is still running Snow Leopard because:

    • it's the most stable and bug-free version of Mac OS (using its predecessor Leopard on a Quicksilver G4 reveals the kinds of annoying bugs in Finder fixed by Snow Leopard... the same kind of crap slowly taking over Apple software again).

    • Snow Leopard is the fastest version of Mac OS. The machine runs Snow Leopard from an external USB hard drive and it still runs twice as fast as the Mavericks installation on the internal original drive. It might matter that the internal is a 5200 RPM drive while the external is a 7200 RPM drive. There's nothing in Mac OS after Mavericks that I want or desire (I love the full screen apps, workspaces, and gestures); I wish it was as fast as Snow Leopard and that my audio tools worked as reliably on it (Logic 9.x has UI problems on Mavericks).

    • I have a lot of older software and hardware that was abandoned by their makers (M-Audio and Avid being the most egregious with abandoned hardware) and therefore don't work on El Capitan, let alone Sierra. There are some hacks to get the M-Audio devices running, but hacks are NOT why I'm a Mac user.

    Using older machines to avoid changing OS is a very common thing in the world of content creation. Many studios (music especially) stuck with Snow Leopard as long as possible. The problem is, once you do finally get forced to upgrade one thing, you end up being forced to upgrade everything. This is both the nature of the tools and an artificially compounded issue driven hard by the industry. Apple is only getting worse about it with the needless changes to Mac OS to accommodate iOS (and the needless changes to iOS to accommodate marketing new phones).

    tallest skiltallest skilking editor the grate
  • Reply 9 of 19
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,285member
    Why does the article say "biggest addition" when talking about putting back something that was already there but recently broken?

    Also, why are these pieces of software so huge in their storage footprint? Prepare graphics for templates I understand, but these sizes still look ludicrous. Especially when the largest versions are on the devices that have the most cramped storage.
    tokyojimu
  • Reply 10 of 19
    gbdocgbdoc Posts: 67member

    I’m a big Keynote user, and was hoping that Aplle would un-dumb it again at some point - mainly on Macs, but also the iOS version - and even improve it. Once more, that hasn’t happened. Bummer! I still prefer KN to PP, but I’m quite disappointed. :s

  • Reply 11 of 19
    gbdocgbdoc Posts: 67member
    dysamoria said:
    Why does the article say "biggest addition" when talking about putting back something that was already there but recently broken?

    Also, why are these pieces of software so huge in their storage footprint? Prepare graphics for templates I understand, but these sizes still look ludicrous. Especially when the largest versions are on the devices that have the most cramped storage.
    Programmers are increasingly sloppier and less elegant than they used to be. Yes, most apps can do more today than they could years ago, which make them bigger, but a lot of needless, sometimes even outdated, code remains in newer versions.
  • Reply 12 of 19
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    dysamoria said:
    the same kind of crap slowly taking over Apple software again).
    What we really need next is Sierra Nevada–the Snow Leopard to Sierra.
  • Reply 13 of 19
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,673member
    So am I the only one who wonders why iOS doesn't have a numeric keypad option for entering only numbers? There are many times when I'm filling in fields, etc that only accept numbers and have to use the full QWERTY keyboard
  • Reply 14 of 19
    foljsfoljs Posts: 348member
    rob53 said:
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
    With Apple you always need to update to the latest OS (at least as soon as a .1 or .2 point release comes out) and you need to update hardware every 5-6 years for the best experience. 

    Or you can go the PC root and still be able to run 17 year old Windows XP on it, but with all the slower adoption of new technologies etc that comes with it. It's a tradeoff.

    Apple being on the "expensive end" of the market, assumes that its customers don't have much of an issue with this (income wise). So, if someone doesn't have the money to burn, saving to buy a Mac and not being able to update it after 5 years or so, will not give them a very good experience. They are not the kind of computers you save your ass off to buy, and then stick with for decades. On the other hand, they are quite durable, and keep their resale price better than PCs, so one can still sell them for a good price 1-2-3 years in.

    With OS X, at the minimum, just stay one OS version behind. People saying "I still use (3-4 versions older OS X) because it is stable for me etc" just don't get it.

    edited April 2017
  • Reply 15 of 19
    aegeanaegean Posts: 114member
    I mostly use it on my iPhone for workout data entries. Numeric keypad is back but date/time keypad is still missing if cell is formatted as date/time. The cell format continue to indicates Automatic no matter you format it as numbers, text, date, etc. The numeric pad is too big and doesn't change it to alpha-numeric keypad within the same screen. I am again going back to old version. 
    edited April 2017 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 16 of 19
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,147member
    aegean said:
    I mostly use it on my iPhone for workout data entries. Numeric keypad is back but date/time keypad is still missing if cell is formatted as date/time. The cell format continue to indicates Automatic no matter you format it as numbers, text, date, etc. The numeric pad is too big and doesn't change it to alpha-numeric keypad within the same screen. I am again going back to old version. 
    I second that!
    I too use Numbers to track workouts and sorely miss the date/time keypad.

    I find it weird that Apple created the touchbar on the MBP to replace fixed function keys with a context sensitive touchbar - but then eliminated context sensitive keyboards on Numbers!  Now I have to switch between numeric and letter keyboards while typing "55m29s" - instead of just using the date/time keyboard I had previously...
  • Reply 17 of 19
    MplsP said:
    So am I the only one who wonders why iOS doesn't have a numeric keypad option for entering only numbers? There are many times when I'm filling in fields, etc that only accept numbers and have to use the full QWERTY keyboard
    If I had my druthers, instead of shift keys to get to symbol keyboards and whatnot, Apple would give us multiple keyboards and a numeric keypad that we can swipe left and right to switch between. After all, we're already used that that action on the home screen and it's a quick action, much easier than looking for the shift keys.
  • Reply 18 of 19
    blah64blah64 Posts: 941member
    foljs said:
    rob53 said:
    So Apple is now giving away the iWork apps but only updating them for macOS. No updates for the previous software. I guess I'm going to have to buy a new Mac.
    With Apple you always need to update to the latest OS (at least as soon as a .1 or .2 point release comes out) and you need to update hardware every 5-6 years for the best experience. 

    Or you can go the PC root and still be able to run 17 year old Windows XP on it, but with all the slower adoption of new technologies etc that comes with it. It's a tradeoff.

    Apple being on the "expensive end" of the market, assumes that its customers don't have much of an issue with this (income wise). So, if someone doesn't have the money to burn, saving to buy a Mac and not being able to update it after 5 years or so, will not give them a very good experience. They are not the kind of computers you save your ass off to buy, and then stick with for decades. On the other hand, they are quite durable, and keep their resale price better than PCs, so one can still sell them for a good price 1-2-3 years in.

    With OS X, at the minimum, just stay one OS version behind. People saying "I still use (3-4 versions older OS X) because it is stable for me etc" just don't get it.

    You don't get it because you're not listening to what others are telling you, only thinking about your own use case.

    If all you do with your computer is email and browse a few web sites, maybe play a few simple games, then everything you say is reasonable.  But did you read what Dysamoria wrote above?  I'd suggest reading, or re-reading more carefully to understand what he/she is saying.  There are a LOT of different reasons to not upgrade.  In their case, they use tools that are literally not supported anymore.  How on earth can you not understand why someone would need to stick with an older OS?!

    Like Dysamoria, I have a 2009 MacBook Pro.  I also have newer computers, but this one runs 10.6 Snow Leopard, is my main laptop, and is by far the most stable machine I own.  I don't believe Dysamoria's "twice as fast as Mavericks" (how would you even benchmark that?), but I can back up the claim that it is faster.  And as they wrote, I have no interest in most of the new features, and in fact I actively DO NOT want most of the new garbage in the latest OS versions, which attempt to make all kinds of internet connections without my permission, and are becoming more and more of a nuisance to block. 

    Software compatibility is always a concern.  Apple is great about allowing older computers to run newer OSs, but not great about letting newer computers run older OSs.  This makes sense from their standpoint as far as compatibility testing and trying to push users to use the latest versions, which helps developers as well, but it can be a huge pain in the ass for end users, especially for machines that are tied to an iPhone via iTunes.  That can be a nightmare of upgrades. 

    I run an older version of Photoshop.  I will never, ever, ever, EVER use any software that's required to phone home.  EVER.  Adobe has lost me (and many others) in their push to tie users into their cloud-based systems.  But, the version I use is not compatible with newer versions of Mac OS X.  So while the OS upgrade might be free, even if I were willing to use Adobe's spyware crap, it would be very expensive upgrade.  Multiple this by all the software I currently use (dozens of apps regularly), and it becomes a huge expense and waste of time.

    "so one can still sell them for a good price 1-2-3 years in."

    To whom?  And isn't that just passing the buck?  Now they are using an older, non-upgraded computer.

    Another point: I cannot tolerate glossy screens.  Literally, I cannot use them.  I've tried, and it drives me bat shit insane.  I am unproductive, as my brain cannot ignore the reflections, which exist in virtually every environment, to greater or lesser extent.  The screen tech is getting better, very slowly over the past few years, and perhaps one day they will get to the point where I can use them, but it's not there yet.  So I'm kind of stuck with older hardware - which is okay, I have little to complain about with 2009/2010 era laptops.  They do pretty much everything I need, though I'd be happy to pay for faster hardware if I could buy something I could use.

    I'll wrap with a question: WHY SHOULD someone feel the need to upgrade their OS all the time?  Security updates are one thing, but Apple has been very good about pushing security updates for a few years after they release an OS.  But adding all the extra connectivity crap weighs on the other side of the scale, making newer OSs more at risk of various kinds of vulnerabilities.  I have zero interest in any add'l connectivity to anything online beyond a simple, secure browser.  Eventually that becomes the gating factor on upgrading.  Currently, the most recent (safest) versions of Firefox do not run on 10.6, and this is a problem.  I need to split my time between different machines because of this issue.

    The bottom line is that you are misguidedly overlaying YOUR needs over other people's lives and use cases, and you are flat-out wrong to do that.



  • Reply 19 of 19
    blah64blah64 Posts: 941member
    Oh, and in my haste to post I forgot to corroborate Dysmoria's comment about stability.

    10.6 Snow Leopard is the most stable OS X release by far.  I have machines around with 10.7, 10.8, 10.9, 10.10 and 10.11, and they all crap out from time to time under WAY less stress than my 10.6 machine, which I brutalize daily and almost never restart.  Maybe 2-3 times a year when I need to boot into an alternate OS to test.   To be fair, I rarely use the 10.11 machine (on a dual-boot), so I can't speak too much to it, but I just had a Yosemite machine I was using crash last night, requiring a hard reboot.  Did some video transcoding and was merely playing it back.  It happens from time to time on that and other machines, but not on Snow Leopard. 
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