Refurbished Samsung Galaxy Note 7 gets Bluetooth SIG certification ahead of relaunch

Posted:
in General Discussion
Samsung's plan to start selling a refurbished version of the ill-fated Note 7 smartphone is getting closer to completion, with the renamed 'Galaxy Note 7R' receiving approval from the Bluetooth SIG ahead of its expected rerelease in a limited number of markets, possibly within the next month.




The Note 7R was spotted passing through the Bluetooth SIG, a regulator enforcing Bluetooth compliance, by PhoneArena. According to the profile information for the smartphone, it was submitted on April 25, with the publication of the device's approval on May 12.

TechnoBuffalo notes the same device received approval from the Federal Communications Commission at the start of May, and was recently submitted to South Korea's NRRA (National Radio Research Agency). The NRRA is the last barrier before the device can go on sale in South Korea, with typical testing times of two to four weeks suggesting a launch in South Korea in early June.

So far, it has been confirmed the Note 7R will go on sale in China and South Korea, but other markets are unknown. There is a possibility for it to be marketed in emerging markets, including India and Vietnam, if sold at a reduced price.

Ultimately, the Note 7R is the same specification as the original Note 7, except for a name change and a smaller 3,200mAh battery.




Investigations into the Note 7 discovered that faults in production of the battery caused the fires, and not issues with software or other hardware used in the device. An initial design flaw that short circuited the battery was fixed after an initial recall, but a manufacturing fault during an ultrasonic welding process introduced a second fault with the replaced batteries.

Refurbishing the Note 7 may help Samsung in multiple ways, following the faulty battery fiasco surrounding the smartphone. The battery issues will cost the firm an estimated $5 billion, with reselling returned and fixed stock potentially aiding in reducing that figure downwards.

The South Korean environment ministry has previously suggested Samsung could face a fine for failing to "observe recycling obligations" for returned stock, giving it a second reason for salvaging the recalled devices.

In February, it was revealed 98 percent of the 3.16 million Note 7 devices sold had been recovered in the global recall, with approximately 200,000 units said to have been used in investigations into what caused the fires.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,569member
    what could go wrong?!
    Muntzpscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 19
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,806member
    What's the deal with limited runs on CE? Sure, everything is finite, but why seemingly limit your sales artificially?  
  • Reply 3 of 19
    metrixmetrix Posts: 250member
    Even though I said this would happen months and months ago, it still boggles my mind. I wouldn't be surprised if returned Note 7's found their way back in consumers hands with no change at all. "It is apparent that some refurbished Note 7s accidentally received no upgrades by accident and we are looking into a 16 point check to eliminate this." This will only keep the memory of fiery Note 7s in peoples minds and hurt Samsung even further. 

    Muntzwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 19
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,787member
    metrix said:
     I wouldn't be surprised if returned Note 7's found their way back in consumers hands with no change at all. 
    And what are the airlines to do, refurbished or not? How can they verify?
    slprescottMuntzwatto_cobrabadmonk
  • Reply 5 of 19
    slprescottslprescott Posts: 752member
    volcan said:
    metrix said:
     I wouldn't be surprised if returned Note 7's found their way back in consumers hands with no change at all. 
    And what are the airlines to do, refurbished or not? How can they verify?
    +1

    This is my concern.  Bad idea (but i realize that Samsung wants to find a way to recoup some money on the devices they needed to take back from consumers.)
    Muntzkevin kee
  • Reply 6 of 19
    rotateleftbyterotateleftbyte Posts: 1,083member
    Samsung seems to want ALL electronic devices totally banned from ALL Flights.
    a sort of 'if we can't play then no one can play' scenario.

    muthuk_vanalingamMuntzwatto_cobrabadmonk
  • Reply 7 of 19
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,884member
    "R" for recalled.
    Muntzwatto_cobra[Deleted User]icoco3badmonk
  • Reply 9 of 19
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,062member
    Try to imagine the outrage if Apple tried something like that.
    Muntzwatto_cobrabadmonk
  • Reply 10 of 19
    MuntzMuntz Posts: 26member
    lkrupp said:
    Try to imagine the outrage if Apple tried something like that.
    Reddit would shit their collective pants and pitchfork sales would hit their highest levels.
    watto_cobrabadmonk
  • Reply 11 of 19
    anomeanome Posts: 1,269member

    What happened to "the Note 7 is toxic, and Samsung will try and distance themselves from it as quickly as possible"? That seemed to be received wisdom last year. Now they're trotting it out for another go.

    Problem is, they'll probably get away with it, and in a couple of years time, either the whole mess will be forgotten, or everyone will talk about how Samsung were able to quickly turn around the faulty product line and boost confidence in their brand, completely ignoring the delays in acknowledging the problem, and then in recalling the phones, and finally in getting out a replacement. While all of Apple's "mistakes" get dredged up every year to remind people about that one time there was a minor problem that they fixed almost immediately, but it inconvenienced someone on social media, so it must be true...

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 19
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,806member
    lkrupp said:
    Try to imagine the outrage if Apple tried something like that.
    Well, every year the same asshats say that the iPhone is the same, and I'm not only talking about the 'S' version with essentially the same casing with all new components.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 19
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,139member
    "...potentially aiding in reducing that figure downwards."

    Redundant language is redundant. Is there ever a case where you reduce something upwards?


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 19
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,160member
    Does the refurbished model come with a lower blast radius? 
    watto_cobramuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 15 of 19
    lkrupp said:
    Try to imagine the outrage if Apple tried something like that.
    Apple does.... https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/apple-refurbished-iphones-india/ I see nothing wrong with manufacturers selling refurbs, it's win/win for everyone including the environment.
  • Reply 16 of 19
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 793member
    So the 5 billion dollar cost of the Note 7 recall is the same amount of money APPL spent on the Apple Park?  I wonder who got the better deal?

    Funny how the Apple-hating crtics never bring that up?  Maybe attention to detail does pay off after all?
    Soli
  • Reply 17 of 19
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 793member
    Plus if these devices don't get a pass from the FAA there will be a lot of buyer's remorse.
  • Reply 18 of 19
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,519member
    Imagine being so full of Apple rage that you would risk your life, home, and family by buying a 7R instead of just getting either an S8 or, you know, a safer product.
  • Reply 19 of 19
    badmonk said:
    So the 5 billion dollar cost of the Note 7 recall is the same amount of money APPL spent on the Apple Park?  I wonder who got the better deal?

    Funny how the Apple-hating crtics never bring that up?  Maybe attention to detail does pay off after all?

    One is a planned expense and other is unplanned expense. Comparing them and asking questions based on that analysis is sheer waste of time.
Sign In or Register to comment.