Apple nixes video glitch repair program for 2011 MacBook Pros

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
Apple is no longer supporting 2011 MacBook Pros as a part of its Repair Extension Program for Video Issues, according to updated support documents.




The company is still covering 15-inch Retina models of the Pro from 2012 and 2013, as long as they were bought less than four years ago, Apple said. Officially the program ended on Dec. 31, 2016, but it continues to be in effect for people within that four-year window.

The program first launched in Feb. 2015, addressing what Apple claimed was a "small percentage" of Pros with absent or distorted video, or prone to sudden reboots. Problems came to light as far back as 2013, however.

In Oct. 2014 the company was in fact hit with a class-action lawsuit, seeking compensation for faulty graphics hardware. A later online petition to Apple executives collected over 40,000 signatures.

People who qualify for the Repair Extension Program can get free repairs for video flaws, but will be charged extra for any separate fixes, or ones that have to be done before the video glitches can be resolved. Repairs can be performed by making an appointment at an Apple store or an authorized service provider, or else by calling Apple support to request a prepaid mail-in box.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    akamine_jrakamine_jr Posts: 11unconfirmed, member
    I think Apple is doing terribly wrong at this.  2012 MacBook is relatively new. Apple should support its prioducts longer than only 5 years
    dysamoria
  • Reply 2 of 29
    wonkothesanewonkothesane Posts: 1,117member
    Interesting. I assume the reason behind the decision is that the MacBook may have become vintage, and therefore spare parts are not kept in stock anymore. So Apple would need to specifically assemble the spare parts in question which can be exorbitantly expensive. OTOH, how many years do they legally need to support hardware? 
    In the end giving the customers a return newer model might be a customer friendly way to go. 
    longpathmwhiteavon b7
  • Reply 3 of 29
    smalmsmalm Posts: 638member
    Interesting. I assume the reason behind the decision is that they think the Repair Extension Program costs to much money and the number of new cases is small enough so they can get away with that.  

    Yes, I own a 2011 Mac Book Pro.... :/ 
    PaulSarab
  • Reply 4 of 29
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 649member
    I think Apple is doing terribly wrong at this.  2012 MacBook is relatively new. Apple should support its prioducts longer than only 5 years
    The 2011 Macbook Pro is now going past the 5 year mark from when it was last sold.....  so it is what Apple would call vintage on the way to obsolete.  Apple only provides service/support for the first 5 years after a product is sold.  As such the normal practice would be that Apple no longer carries replacement parts or provides service to machines at that point.  So it is not that much of a surprise that if they do not carry or service the product -- that the free service for this issue would end at the same time.  (not saying one way or the other I agree or not)

    Owners of iPhone, iPad, iPod, or Mac products may obtain service and parts from Apple or Apple service providers for 5 years after the product is no longer manufactured—or longer where required by law. Apple has discontinued support for certain technologically obsolete and vintage products.
    mwhitebaconstang
  • Reply 5 of 29
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 183member
    The problem for me is not so much the 2011 MacBook Pro but the 17" MacBook Pro. 

    You'd have to pry my 17" from my cold dead hands for me to give it up or upgrade to newer models. 
    edited May 2017 pscooter63tipoo
  • Reply 6 of 29
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,549member
    I hope everyone with defective hardware got it replaced by now. When my MacBook Pro 3,1 GPU died, it was after the extended repair program was done. It's still defective hardware, but it didn't die quickly enough to be covered.
    avon b7
  • Reply 7 of 29
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 649member
    dysamoria said:
    I hope everyone with defective hardware got it replaced by now. When my MacBook Pro 3,1 GPU died, it was after the extended repair program was done. It's still defective hardware, but it didn't die quickly enough to be covered.
    How do you know it died because of "defective" hardware?  The further away from purchase date, the more potential causes of failure (accumulative) there are.  If you bought a larger sample size and the overall sample size died quicker than what was claimed as the mean time to failure you can statistically be more sure -- but when your sample size is one.... someone would have to do an autopsy of sorts on the computer to find the cause of failure.

    BTW, I have a stack of about 14 3TB Seagate hard drives that failed and the 3 year mark typically - so a larger sample size... but any individual one I could not guess as to it's failure.
    baconstangmagman1979
  • Reply 8 of 29
    razormaidrazormaid Posts: 299member
    I put my computer in for repair but for the mouse. When I picked it up I was expecting  to pay the $276 tube up fee. Instead I was shocked to find out it was free. "free??"

    it turns out the mouse was caused from a swelling battery. As part of tube up they replaced both. But much to my surprise they replaced my brand new maxes out RAM stating mine didn't optimize the machine. They also replac d the entire logic board and the LCD screen. Why??

    it turn out my model serial number fell inside the range for recall and as it is apple's policy anything happening or replaced during the recall replacement then EVERYTHING is free and included. 

    I actualky thought this was over kill and demanded they let me pay for all repairs they refused. "At least take my $276". Nope they wouldn't 

    so I'm guessing this announcement now only covers the recall repair and not everything else. 

    By the way this was on my 17" 2011 laptop so thanks!!!
    baconstangmagman1979pscooter63
  • Reply 9 of 29
    My early 2011 matte 17" MacBook Pro was purchased March 28, 2011.  It died April 26, 2013 due the discrete graphic chip.  I paid to have the logic board replaced.  It died again 2 years later on May 13, 2015.  At that point the repair program was in place, so it was repaired at no cost.  Soon after I received a refund for the original repair.  Then 2 years later the computer died again -- April 22, 2017.  Apple was going to replace the board one last time, but it turns out there are no more early 2011 logic boards left.

    Key point: Apple never actually fixed the problem.  They kept giving me bad boards.  Now I'm SOL.  Apple won't do anything.

    This is, without question, a manufacturing defect.  Yes Apple repaired the computer, but they did so with a bad part.  Twice.

    Totally unacceptable



    avon b7dysamoriatipoo
  • Reply 10 of 29
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 42,708member
    This is, without question, a manufacturing defect.  Yes Apple repaired the computer, but they did so with a bad part.  Twice. Totally unacceptable
    That was SOP for the Early 2008 MacBook Pro with the nVidia chip that the company admitted was defective out of the factory. Sure, you could get a board replacement, but it would only be replaced with chips that are ALSO defective and are guaranteed to fail.

    And mine failed outside Apple's repair policy (which shouldn't have ended IN THE FIRST PLACE, as it was a MANUFACTURING DEFECT), so I was SoL even before I was SoL.
    dysamoriatipoo
  • Reply 11 of 29
    hentaiboyhentaiboy Posts: 644member
    Here in Australia, consumer law dictates that a manufacturer must supply parts and service for seven years after last date of manufacture. So although Apple could refuse to fix for free, they couldn't refuse to fix. 
    dysamoria
  • Reply 12 of 29
    I had a 2011 MBP15 that died twice.  Both motherboards replaced "free".   The second time I didn't care if they were going to replace them forever or not, I just couldn't trust it again so I sold it in good working condition.  When you spend 2000 dollars on a laptop you sort of expect it to last a real long time.  It's the main reason I just couldn't see getting one of the Pros since 2012 except the 2012 MBP13 which, though not glamorous, is a solid little laptop.
    dysamoriatipoo
  • Reply 13 of 29
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 3,875member
    I think Apple is doing terribly wrong at this.  2012 MacBook is relatively new. Apple should support its prioducts longer than only 5 years
    BS! Apple has gone above and beyond to support a now over 5yr old device. It recognized an issue, provided a solution and kept that solution going. This sounds more like you have a 2011 MacBook Pro and expect Apple to support it forever so you don't have to buy a new one should something go wrong with it because you know it has a known issue. I think Apple has supported this product a lot longer than many manufacturers would.
    magman1979pscooter63
  • Reply 14 of 29
    chickchick Posts: 30member
    My 2011 17" MBP is still going strong. I have upgraded it to 16 GB RAM and  a 2 TB HD and a 500 GB SSD replacing the original HD and DVD drives. Thank you OWC. Same with my late 2012 Mac Mini.  Before I get replacements, Apple will have to go back to providing at least the easy ability to uprade RAM AND hard drives, well that not true, if they die I'll get whatever the current maxed out version happens to be.
    Edit: my MBP will be 6 years old in October (as will my wife's MBA) anything past that point is bonus time as far as I am concerned. My longestest lasting Apple was a Mac II was very nicely usanle for over 10 years (with suitable RAM and drive updates - something which my contemporaneous IBM PC AT could not support). I forget how many megs of RAM I put in the Mac but it far exceeded what the PC AT was able to handle because that manufacturer didn't bring out all the address lines that the'86 could support. Although I am long retired, I may just buy a new (yet to be released) Mac Pro just because it will be updatable. I was a design engineer at both Intel and AMD - THE STORIES i could tell...
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 15 of 29
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 664member
    From Apple.com:

    VINTAGE PRODUCTS: are those that have not been manufactured for more than 5 and less than 7 years ago. 

    OBSOLETE PRODUCTS: are those that were discontinued more than 7 years ago. 

    Apple has discontinued hardware service for vintage products with the following exceptions:
    1. TURKEY: Mac products purchased in the country of Turkey. Owners of vintage Mac products may obtain service and parts from Apple service providers within the country of Turkey.
    2. CALIFORNIA:  Products purchased in the state of California, United States, as required by statute
    3. FRANCE: For products purchased in France, see Statutory Warranties of Seller and Spare Parts.

    Apple has discontinued all hardware service for obsolete products with no exceptions. Service providers cannot order parts for obsolete products. 

    In the United States and Turkey, the MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011) is still Vintage.

    In California, you can still get hardware service on Vintage Apple Hardware until 2018. At that time it becomes obsolete.

    The key is that the Macbook Pro 17 2011 is no longer eligible for a FREE repair under the Video Glitch Repair Program. You have to pay for the repair. 

    In the rest of the United States, you are out of luck getting the computer serviced at Apple since Apple won't provide hardware service to repair the computer. But third party repair services may be able to repair it for you since parts are still available.

    avon b7
  • Reply 16 of 29
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 664member
    hentaiboy said:
    Here in Australia, consumer law dictates that a manufacturer must supply parts and service for seven years after last date of manufacture. So although Apple could refuse to fix for free, they couldn't refuse to fix. 

    So Apple's and Australia's definition of obsolete agree. Both agree that a product that is more than 7 years after manufacture is obsolete and can be no longer serviced.

    Like California, in Australia, vintage products are still eligible for hardware repairs.  They aren't free. But repairs are still available.

    In other areas of the world, vintage products are not eligible for repair. So products that are older than 5 years are no longer repaired by Apple.
  • Reply 17 of 29
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 664member
    An interesting question:  What if Apple provided for sale an extended warranty that lasts up to 10 years?  Consumers would pay $100 to $200 a year for the service - up front. Apple would make lots of money from this since its product generally last a long time for the vast majority of users. That would add billions to Apple's income without having to do much work for it. 


  • Reply 18 of 29
    EsquireCatsEsquireCats Posts: 382member
    It's hard to feign outrage here. These programs have to end eventually (due to training & parts) and this window is sufficiently large for such a repair program, we're talking about laptops that were released around the time of the iPhone 4.

    I know we'd all like these programs to run forever, but that is not realistic. If someone came to me with a 2011 MBP with restarting issues(covered under this repair program), then I would need significant mental gymnastics to assume that the problem was a manufacturing fault from a time when Steve Jobs was still doing keynotes. I wonder how many of these repairs Apple was even doing at this late stage? We're talking about a fault which affected a very small percentage of devices that are up to 6 years old.



    pscooter63
  • Reply 19 of 29
    doggonedoggone Posts: 150member
    For owners of the 1st gen retina MBP, Apple will be providing a free battery replacement due to current constrained supplies.  I found this out when I put mine in for a replacement.  I didn't want to wait so paid for it now but was told it could take several weeks to get the parts.  Funny thing is that the repair was complete in less than a week.
    With the battery replacement they also change out the keyboard, mouse pad and to surface.  There also is a free screen replacement for delamination effects.  
    So in the end almost all of the laptop was changed out with the exception of the motherboard.
  • Reply 20 of 29
    bkkcanuckbkkcanuck Posts: 649member
    An interesting question:  What if Apple provided for sale an extended warranty that lasts up to 10 years?  Consumers would pay $100 to $200 a year for the service - up front. Apple would make lots of money from this since its product generally last a long time for the vast majority of users. That would add billions to Apple's income without having to do much work for it. 


    Actually, I believe that the cost to support hardware goes up over time.  Generically speaking, at the time the product is discontinued -- if the parts are not used in a newer model (cars have a longer life-cycle for parts).... the manufacturer has to basically forecast future needs.... stockpile and warehouse the parts (or reclaim them from other computers that are no longer in use for various reasons) etc.  

    With consumer electronics - such as laptops -- they are basically appliances and the manufacturing has made newer models (that don't have mechanical parts) basically single body machines where all the components are manufactured (non-replaceable) which makes the hardware more resilient and cheaper to manufacture (with a much lower overall failure rate) -- but makes the replacement of parts impossible.   The maintenance of the products becomes more of an insurance product rather than maintenance.  If you take it into Apple for repair and they find one of the components is defective -- they replace the component (which is either the entire computer, screen or battery)...  [3rd parties might actually make unsupported repairs by soldering etc.]

    In the end the cost of such an option would be much more and over 10 years the amortized cost would increase.... so if they were to flatten the payment schedule over 10 years the price per year (early) would be seen as a money grab (with the appropriate markup for said insurance) and would be more damaging to the brand than helpful.

    In the end - the option to keep on using hardware without "worries" of it breaking down.... would be better served by leasing the hardware......
    edited May 2017
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