Nike debuts four new Apple Watch bands to coincide with shoe launch

Posted:
in Apple Watch
Nike on Monday introduced four new Nike Sport Band colors for the Apple Watch, designed to match the company's Air VaporMax Flyknit "Day to Night" running shoe collection.




All four of the new bands will be available through Nike's online and retail stores on June 1, and through Apple and its resellers in "early June," the company said. As with other Sport Bands, they'll be priced at $49 each.

While marketed for the Apple Watch Nike+, the bands should work with any Watch model.

Nike has become more aggressive about selling to Apple customers since helping to launch the Nike+ Watch in late 2016. Yet another co-branded Watch, the NikeLab, arrived on April 27, and earlier in May the company began selling iPhone 7 cases based on its Rosche and Air Force 1 sneakers.

The change is presumably linked to Apple CEO Tim Cook, who first joined Nike's board in 2005 while he was still COO. Last June, however, he became the apparel giant's lead independent director, likely making it easy to arrange partnerships that benefit his own company.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    Ugh.  For all the (silly) talk about Apple caring more about style than function, this a crazy.  I'm not only going to buy running shoes because I like the color and styling, but I'm also to pay $50 to match my watch band to those shoes??
  • Reply 2 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,402member
    Ugh.  For all the (silly) talk about Apple caring more about style than function, this a crazy.  I'm not only going to buy running shoes because I like the color and styling, but I'm also to pay $50 to match my watch band to those shoes??
    Why not? People buy visual accessories for their clothing every single day. Doesn't mean you have to -- just like how I don't wear necklaces of any sort, ever.
    edited May 2017 cali
  • Reply 3 of 22

    Ok fine.  For those people who find it critical that they color coordinate while they are exercising, this is truly a marvel.  I expect that these people are hurting their image while thinking they are improving it, but whatever.  Perhaps next we'll get watch bands color coordinated to power tools so we'll know which home improvement contractors care about the important things in life (and can avoid hiring them),

  • Reply 4 of 22
    sog35 said:

    Ok fine.  For those people who find it critical that they color coordinate while they are exercising, this is truly a marvel.  I expect that these people are hurting their image while thinking they are improving it, but whatever.  Perhaps next we'll get watch bands color coordinated to power tools so we'll know which home improvement contractors care about the important things in life (and can avoid hiring them),

    People WEAR shoes.
    People WEAR watches.

    People don't WEAR power tools.

    Your lack of knowlege about fashion is so obvious.


    Running shoes are a tool.  A watch is a tool.  Power tools are tools.

    Oh, I'm so hurt that my knowledge of fashion is lacking.

    But, I'm pretty confident that this fashion experiment by Nike (creating watch bands to match a particular brand of shoe, rather than watch bands that look good in general while working out) will be a flop.  Or more likely, they are only doing this as a marketing gimmick to draw attention to their pretty 'Air VaporMax Flyknit "Day to Night"' running shoe collection, and they don't care if they sell any of these watch bands.

  • Reply 5 of 22
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
  • Reply 6 of 22
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 1,998member
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Amazon isn't an official retailer of Nike products. That's a bad place to look for Nike prices, which are usually higher than official retailers. The Vapormax Flyknit cost $190.
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 7 of 22
    TheYaksTheYaks Posts: 1member
    The fact that Cook is Lead Independent Director for Nike should make it slightly more difficult for him to cut deals between Apple and Nike.  On the Nike board, Cook represents Nike and needs to avoid conflicts, such as arranging deals that would benefit Apple.  Though likely unintended, the statement at the end of your article ("he became the apparel giant's lead independent director, likely making it easy to arrange partnerships that benefit his own company") is actually a serious allegation that Cook is abusing his board position and duties with Nike to benefit Apple.  You may want to reconsider that statement.
  • Reply 8 of 22
    peterhartpeterhart Posts: 83member
    I personally own 20 Watch sport bands and change the band on a near-daily basis based on what I wear. Some people just like to do that, whether working out or normal day to day fashion, whether or not you have a sense of fashion as well. I doubt these bands will be a flop as noted earlier. I'm interested in seeing the darker blue one...and maybe I'll check out the shoes as well. Great thing about Apple's products is that something somewhere appeals to someone. :)
    brucemcStrangeDays
  • Reply 9 of 22
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    Would go nice with my Nike shoe iPhone case. :p
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 10 of 22
    sog35 said:
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Duh!!!  Like I said you know nothing about fashion.

    All the expensive Nike shoes are for fashion.

    Stop criticizing something you don't understand.

    LOL.  That's what Tim Cook said about you.
  • Reply 11 of 22
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Amazon isn't an official retailer of Nike products. That's a bad place to look for Nike prices, which are usually higher than official retailers. The Vapormax Flyknit cost $190.

    Fair enough, but the point is that these aren't $60 running shoes where performance features are the primary purchase criteria.  You can also find these on Amazon for $19, but something seems a little fishy about that :)
  • Reply 12 of 22

    Ok fine.  For those people who find it critical that they color coordinate while they are exercising, this is truly a marvel.

    I get what you are saying but consider this.  I go to a few group exercise classes a week and there is one woman in particular who [b]loves[/b] to color coordinate her outfits (yes, "outfits" plural).  She frequently and deliberately finds pants or shirts that match her shoes.  She also has multiple colors of shoes that she'll wear to different classes or on different days.  She just got an Apple Watch in January with a couple of different bands, both pink or with pink.  When I saw this article I sent her the photo and gave her a brief summary.  She was excited about it except she says Nikes hurt her feet.  I guess that's more of a problem when you're her age, she's turning 70 this year.

    But either way, changing her watch band to match her shoes is something that is very appealing to her.  For me, I'm fine with my black Sport Band on my first gen Apple Watch at the gym or work.  When I go out I usually switch to my Space Black SS with Link Bracelet.  I have a sort of lime green Sport Band that came with my watch (the only color that was available in a 42mm to receive on launch day) that I haven't worn since I bought the black band close to 2 years ago.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 13 of 22
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,299member
    Nike make hundreds of different designs of shoes but don't make matching bands for most of them.
    people will probably either by just the band because they like the colour or they'll buy the band and the shoes to match.

  • Reply 14 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,402member
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Then you're clearly speaking out of ignorance -- that's exactly what a high quality pair of squat shoes cost. You know what those are used for? Squats, and about nothing else. Good specialist products are often expensive. Just because you don't like expensive things doesn't mean they don't have value. 

    Side note, anytime I see anyone snidely use the word "fashionistas" I know they're creating a false narrative about whatever it is they don't like, and it's almost never grounded in reality, only ignorance and resentment. 
  • Reply 15 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,402member
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Amazon isn't an official retailer of Nike products. That's a bad place to look for Nike prices, which are usually higher than official retailers. The Vapormax Flyknit cost $190.
    Fair enough, but the point is that these aren't $60 running shoes where performance features are the primary purchase criteria.  You can also find these on Amazon for $19, but something seems a little fishy about that :)
    Again it's clear you don't know anything about shoes. $60 won't get you high quality running shoes, at all. That's a pair of sneakers to go trot around the driveway in. Ask a runner friend who is actually into running what they spend on good shoes. Shoes which get used up and need to be replaced every season or two, mind you. Be prepared to be surprised. There's a wide world out there of things you don't know. There's no shame in that, but there is for suggesting it shouldn't exist because you're not aware of it or into it. 
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 16 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,735member
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Then you're clearly speaking out of ignorance -- that's exactly what a high quality pair of squat shoes cost. You know what those are used for? Squats, and about nothing else. Good specialist products are often expensive. Just because you don't like expensive things doesn't mean they don't have value. 

    Side note, anytime I see anyone snidely use the word "fashionistas" I know they're creating a false narrative about whatever it is they don't like, and it's almost never grounded in reality, only ignorance and resentment. 
    Although I'm all for "specialists" (sic) shoes, I used to do half squat jumps (yeah, jumps with huge loads) when I was on the Canadian high jump track team in the 1980s and my shoes were plain $80 pairs (in today's money).  Pretty sure my use was near the most extreme you could do for any shoes (the jumping with a load and the need to not be destroyed in the process) (don't try it at home folks ;-) and so I find the claims about those shoes very very dubious (not just nike ones).

    The only expensive shoes I had were my jumping spikes and those were second hand and probably $100 at most new ($200 dollars now).

    All those shoe's prices are mostly for the fashion angle, not the so called "technical" angle"; that angle is in most case, a marketing spin.
    I do buy those kind of shoes at liquidation outlets (Nike, Rebeok, New Balance, whatever) for 1/5 the price they're sold new, so I don't have to worry about spending loads of money on shoes.
  • Reply 17 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,735member
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Amazon isn't an official retailer of Nike products. That's a bad place to look for Nike prices, which are usually higher than official retailers. The Vapormax Flyknit cost $190.
    Fair enough, but the point is that these aren't $60 running shoes where performance features are the primary purchase criteria.  You can also find these on Amazon for $19, but something seems a little fishy about that :)
    Again it's clear you don't know anything about shoes. $60 won't get you high quality running shoes, at all. That's a pair of sneakers to go trot around the driveway in. Ask a runner friend who is actually into running what they spend on good shoes. Shoes which get used up and need to be replaced every season or two, mind you. Be prepared to be surprised. There's a wide world out there of things you don't know. There's no shame in that, but there is for suggesting it shouldn't exist because you're not aware of it or into it. 
    It is highly possible to get great shoes for $100 if you've got an ear out for a bargain. The expensive shoes can be bought on sales/liquidations, annually if you know where to look for them. Currently got Reebok shoes supposedly $200 retail on my feet that I got for less than $50. Even off brand shoes Asian brands can be found that are pretty well constructed for next to nothing (but since I mostly buy liquidation normal brands, I don't really need to do that).
  • Reply 18 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,402member
    foggyhill said:
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Then you're clearly speaking out of ignorance -- that's exactly what a high quality pair of squat shoes cost. You know what those are used for? Squats, and about nothing else. Good specialist products are often expensive. Just because you don't like expensive things doesn't mean they don't have value. 

    Side note, anytime I see anyone snidely use the word "fashionistas" I know they're creating a false narrative about whatever it is they don't like, and it's almost never grounded in reality, only ignorance and resentment. 
    Although I'm all for "specialists" (sic) shoes, I used to do half squat jumps (yeah, jumps with huge loads) when I was on the Canadian high jump track team in the 1980s and my shoes were plain $80 pairs (in today's money).  Pretty sure my use was near the most extreme you could do for any shoes (the jumping with a load and the need to not be destroyed in the process) (don't try it at home folks ;-) and so I find the claims about those shoes very very dubious (not just nike ones).

    The only expensive shoes I had were my jumping spikes and those were second hand and probably $100 at most new ($200 dollars now).

    All those shoe's prices are mostly for the fashion angle, not the so called "technical" angle"; that angle is in most case, a marketing spin.
    I do buy those kind of shoes at liquidation outlets (Nike, Rebeok, New Balance, whatever) for 1/5 the price they're sold new, so I don't have to worry about spending loads of money on shoes.
    I'll have to disagree with you, as do the professional strength trainers I follow -- Mark Rippetoe, Alan Thrall, olympic weight lifting teams, etc... Stationary squats are an entirely different movement and use case than box jumps. The point of squat shoes is to enable obtain proper depth while keeping the shins more upright which means less movement arm at the ankles. It's just physics. But the quality build is what helps support your arch while also keeping a flat surface area and not compressing under load (some squat shoes even use wood for this). A good pair will last your lifetime of squatting. 

    Runners can go on in a similar fashion about the virtues of expensive running shoes. As can climbers, hikers, etc etc..
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 19 of 22
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,402member

    foggyhill said:
    I just looked these shoes up on Amazon.  They cost $250-$350.  Based on that I expect these are worn more by fashionistas than athletes.
    Amazon isn't an official retailer of Nike products. That's a bad place to look for Nike prices, which are usually higher than official retailers. The Vapormax Flyknit cost $190.
    Fair enough, but the point is that these aren't $60 running shoes where performance features are the primary purchase criteria.  You can also find these on Amazon for $19, but something seems a little fishy about that :)
    Again it's clear you don't know anything about shoes. $60 won't get you high quality running shoes, at all. That's a pair of sneakers to go trot around the driveway in. Ask a runner friend who is actually into running what they spend on good shoes. Shoes which get used up and need to be replaced every season or two, mind you. Be prepared to be surprised. There's a wide world out there of things you don't know. There's no shame in that, but there is for suggesting it shouldn't exist because you're not aware of it or into it. 
    It is highly possible to get great shoes for $100 if you've got an ear out for a bargain. The expensive shoes can be bought on sales/liquidations, annually if you know where to look for them. Currently got Reebok shoes supposedly $200 retail on my feet that I got for less than $50. Even off brand shoes Asian brands can be found that are pretty well constructed for next to nothing (but since I mostly buy liquidation normal brands, I don't really need to do that).
    First, I doubt some no name knockoffs are going to be as good. 

    Second, we're not talking about fire sales or inventory liquidation. We're talking about the retail price of things. In my experience most often you get what you pay for -- and a couple hundred dollars for shoes is not unusual or without merit. 
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 20 of 22
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,525member
    Not sure what the sneering about fashion is in aid of. Why can't athletes want to look while working out?  Is there some ideological purity to exercise that means they should be disparaged?

    I think the bands look great, and it's entirely expected that Nike coordinate colours across their range.
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